Obituaries

Obituaries

roger
roger

January 3rd, 2003, 5:32 pm #1

I will try to post obituaries here.
Quote
Share

roger
roger

January 3rd, 2003, 5:33 pm #2

Andrew J. Kauffman II, 82, a retired Foreign Service officer and enthusiastic mountain climber who was widely known in the mountaineering community for participating in the first ascent of "Hidden Peak" in the Karakoram region of Pakistan, died Dec. 24 at Villa Rosa Nursing Home in Mitchellville. He had Parkinson's disease.
But his passion was mountain climbing, and in 1958 -- with Peter K. Schoening of Seattle -- he reached the summit of the previously unclimbed Gasherbrum I, also is known as Hidden Peak. At 26,470 feet, it is one of the 10 highest mountains in the world, and it is the only mountain of more than 8,000 meters where the first ascent was made by a U.S. team.
Mr. Kauffman was posted in Paris early in 1958 when he was invited to participate in the Hidden Peak climbing expedition, and he applied for a leave of absence. Told informally in Paris that his request had been approved, he left for Pakistan. Once there, and having reached the summit of Hidden Peak, he found out the request had been denied by officials in Washington. By then, his supervisors at the State Department decided that since he was already in that part of the world, they would assign him to an opening in the U.S. consul's office in Calcutta. He spent the next three years there.
Both literally and figuratively, the ascent of Hidden Peak was the summit of Mr. Kauffman's climbing career. In the 1960s and 1970s, he led backpacking trips into some of the less-strenuous terrains of the Canadian Rockies, and he did rock climbing in the area. To novice and younger climbers, he was sometimes known as "Uncle Andy."

With Putnam, Mr. Kauffman was author of two books. "The Guiding Spirit" was about the life of Edward Feuz Jr., one of the Swiss guides brought to the Canadian Rockies by the Canadian Pacific Railway in the early part of the 20th century. "K2 -- The 1939 Tragedy" concerned the mystery surrounding the deaths of four men who unsuccessfully attempted to reach the summit of the as-of-then unclimbed K2, the world's second-highest mountain. He was editor of "Mountaineering for Beginners," published in 1978.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ar ... 3Jan2.html

Quote
Share

roger
roger

January 3rd, 2003, 5:35 pm #3

I will try to post obituaries here.
No region in the country has a lower percentage of churchgoers than the Pacific Northwest. But ask people here about the existence of a camera-resistant, grooming-challenged, upright biped known as Bigfoot or Sasquatch and the true believers shout to the misty heavens in affirmation.


So it came as a considerable blow when the children of Ray L. Wallace announced that their prank-loving pop had created the modern myth of Bigfoot when he used a pair of carved wooden feet to stomp a track of oversized footprints in a Northern California logging camp in 1958. Mr. Wallace, 84, died on Nov. 26 at a nursing home in Centralia, Wash.
"This wasn't a well-planned plot or anything," said Michael Wallace, one of Ray's sons. "It's weird because it was just a joke, and then it took on such a life of its own that even now, we can't stop it."
In the Northwest, the hirsute hominid, who dates to American Indian lore as Sasquatch, is a minor industry. A publisher - Sasquatch Books - and an N.B.A. team mascot - Squatch of the Seattle Supersonics - are both named for the ape-like primate. Several organizations host regular conferences on the subject. There are field guides for tracking Bigfoot, music tapes and CD's with his sounds (a low, heavy-breathing moan, not unlike a winded Homer Simpson), and innumerable works of art inspired by his shaggy essence.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/03/national/03FOOT.html
Quote
Share

roger
roger

January 16th, 2003, 3:16 pm #4

Trevor Denny, an avid hiker, was hiking with his puppy on the Mesa Cortina trail between Red and Buffalo mountains in the Gore Range last June when he noticed several footprints on the trail.

Neither U.S. Forest Service District Ranger Jamie Connell nor Summit County Sheriff Joe Morales has taken reports from people regarding possible sightings of the mythical beast. Both said it wouldn't surprise them if someone asked them to some day.

But according to the Bigfoot Field Research Organization, at http://wee.brfo.net, there have been several sightings in Colorado throughout the decades. Most occurred in Park, Conejos and Eagle counties. One was reported in Summit County, in the woods off Highway 91 between Copper Mountain and Leadville.

Denny said the footprints he found - the largest of which measured 12 to 13 inches in length - were in the middle of the trail and intermingled with bear paw prints. Denny followed the footprints up the trail until they faded away.
http://www.summitdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dl ... 105&Ref=AR
Mesa Cortina Trail on Web
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... tina+trail
Quote
Share

roger
roger

January 16th, 2003, 3:18 pm #5

I will try to post obituaries here.
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Journalist and author Carson Brewer, who wrote passionately about East Tennessee and the Great Smoky Mountains for more than five decades, died Wednesday following a lengthy illness. He was 82.
A retired columnist for The Knoxville News-Sentinel, Brewer suffered from Parkinson's disease and died of complications from pneumonia at St. Mary's Hospital.
He also wrote four books, including Day Hikes of the Smokies, a classic hiking guide recently reissued to benefit the Great Smoky Mountains Natural History Association.
"Carson Brewer's gift has been that he's made the trails of the Smokies come alive for those who have never hiked them and those who hike them every week," said U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/n ... 955208.htm

More on Carson Brewer
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... son+Brewer
Last edited by dipper on January 16th, 2003, 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Olivier Kozlowski
Olivier Kozlowski

January 16th, 2003, 5:03 pm #6

Trevor Denny, an avid hiker, was hiking with his puppy on the Mesa Cortina trail between Red and Buffalo mountains in the Gore Range last June when he noticed several footprints on the trail.

Neither U.S. Forest Service District Ranger Jamie Connell nor Summit County Sheriff Joe Morales has taken reports from people regarding possible sightings of the mythical beast. Both said it wouldn't surprise them if someone asked them to some day.

But according to the Bigfoot Field Research Organization, at http://wee.brfo.net, there have been several sightings in Colorado throughout the decades. Most occurred in Park, Conejos and Eagle counties. One was reported in Summit County, in the woods off Highway 91 between Copper Mountain and Leadville.

Denny said the footprints he found - the largest of which measured 12 to 13 inches in length - were in the middle of the trail and intermingled with bear paw prints. Denny followed the footprints up the trail until they faded away.
http://www.summitdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dl ... 105&Ref=AR
Mesa Cortina Trail on Web
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... tina+trail
" - the largest of which measured 12 to 13 inches in length - "

Gee, I wear size 13 boots. Unfortunately I haven't been to Colorado lately, so I guess these aren't my tracks!
Quote
Share

Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

January 22nd, 2003, 4:42 am #7

I will try to post obituaries here.
VANCOUVER - In the snowboarding world Craig Kelly was considered an icon, a builder of the sport and a man who loved escaping the confines of resorts to ride in the pristine backcountry.

Kelly, 36, who grew up in Mount Vernon, WA, and lived the last two years in Nelson, B.C., was killed Monday in a massive avalanche near Revelstoke, B.C. The four-time world champion and three-time U.S. Open champion, was one of seven people killed in a smothering mountain of snow that was 30 meters wide and almost 100 meters long.

<a href=http://www.canada.com/sports/story.html ... 2DCF>Click here to read the rest of the article</a>.

Quote
Share

roger
roger

March 7th, 2003, 3:14 pm #8

I will try to post obituaries here.
Legendary resistance fighter and mountainman Claus Helberg died Thursday after suffering a heart attack. Active until just last weekend, Helberg made history for his roles in wartime sabotage actions and later for guiding queens on mountain hikes.
Helberg was perhaps best known, and later immortalized by Hollywood, for helping end German plans for using heavy water in Telemark during the war. He and fellow Telemark native Gunnar Soensteby inspired the 1965 film on the sabotage action, "The Heroes of Telemark," starring Kirk Douglas and Richard Harris.
He first joined The Norwegian Mountain Touring Association (DNT) in 1938 and worked tirelessly for the group's efforts to make the mountains more user-friendly and alluring. He helped build trails and mountain cabins and traveled all over the country, giving lectures.
http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local ... eID=504093
Claus Helberg on web
Telemark Heavy Water on web
Quote
Share

roger
roger

March 7th, 2003, 3:16 pm #9

I will try to post obituaries here.
For the record I should have included this obituary under this thread.

http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1045090747
Quote
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 19th, 2003, 4:19 pm #10

I will try to post obituaries here.
Details of the avalanche are available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1048086643
Quote
Like
Share