Leashed Dogs Above 4000 Feet in 'Daks

Leashed Dogs Above 4000 Feet in 'Daks

roger
roger

May 1st, 2000, 9:15 am #1

I've gotten word that dogs must be leashed above 4,000 feet in the 'daks and at campsites.
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Fred
Fred

May 1st, 2000, 8:06 pm #2

How did dogs go from being our best friend to our worst friend so quickly? What is the reason for this new regulation? Environmental? Public safety? Animal protection? These anti-dog regulations are popping up everywhere.

I went camping and hiking in Central Pennsylvania this weekend and found out that you can't have dogs in overnight areas is any State Park there -- NOT even on a leash! It's OK to take in a sound system, a half-of-side of beef, and a ton of trash, but don't take your dog!




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roger
roger

May 1st, 2000, 9:02 pm #3

It sounds like I may have to add Mt. Davis to the list of forbidden dog summits.

I will investigate further why dogs aren't permitted without a leash above 4000 feet on Marcy.

There are 2 hot button issues in outdoor groups -- mountain bikes and dogs. Mercifully, we haven't gotten sucked into the full rant here (yet).

I do appreciate the extreme delicate nature of alpine areas -- particularly when the alpine is as rare as it is back East.

And I suspect that we are loving our peaks to death and few poorly supervised dogs are probably stirring all this trouble.




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Fred
Fred

May 1st, 2000, 9:20 pm #4

It's only in the overnight areas (i.e camping areas)that they are not allowed. Sadie, my Lab, has done Mt. Davis
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AmyG
AmyG

May 3rd, 2000, 5:07 pm #5

How did dogs go from being our best friend to our worst friend so quickly? What is the reason for this new regulation? Environmental? Public safety? Animal protection? These anti-dog regulations are popping up everywhere.

I went camping and hiking in Central Pennsylvania this weekend and found out that you can't have dogs in overnight areas is any State Park there -- NOT even on a leash! It's OK to take in a sound system, a half-of-side of beef, and a ton of trash, but don't take your dog!



Hi Fred

Mandating that your dog be on a leash and prohibiting them altogether from areas are two very different things. In many cases, leash laws mean on leash OR under voice control at all times, but I am sure this is subject to interpretation. As long as dogs on the trails are under control, are not being allowed to chase wildlife and are being cleaned up after, there shouldn't be a problem, right?

In a perfect world, anyway. Unfortunately, there are some who would abuse the privelage and ruin it for those of us who are responsible canine hikers...

I know what you mean about PA...it is not one of the most dog friendly states, but there ARE a lot of nice areas here to camp, outside of the state parks system. Patches and I have seen a lot of ground...never leave home without her!

Happy tails >er< trails, that is!
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Nicole
Nicole

May 8th, 2000, 3:20 pm #6

I'm climbing marcy this weekend and while I am glad that I am even "allowed" to bring my dog, kaiser, it's going to be a little weird to put his leash on him at the top.
He has saved my life more than once and I feel very fortunate to have him. Sometimes, rules are meant to be broken....
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David Metsky
David Metsky

May 9th, 2000, 5:11 pm #7

There are backcountry information officers on top of Marcy and Algonquin all summer long. They hang out up top all day long, talking to nearly every hiker as they arrive. I don't know if they will be up there this early, but if they are, they will enforce the rules.

The High Peak summits are very heavily used. Most of the summit area is scarred by people (and dogs) walking on fragile plantlife, eroding the thin layer of soil. I think that preventing more damage is the main goal of the rules.

-dave-
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roger
roger

May 10th, 2000, 2:01 pm #8

I'm climbing marcy this weekend and while I am glad that I am even "allowed" to bring my dog, kaiser, it's going to be a little weird to put his leash on him at the top.
He has saved my life more than once and I feel very fortunate to have him. Sometimes, rules are meant to be broken....
This post catches two hot button issues on Marcy.

The first is that New York DEC is asking for a voluntary ban on hiking Marcy through mid-June in order to prevent damage to the soggy trails.

The second is that you are definitely treading on thin ice in announcing implied intentions to violate the leash rules. Flagrant violation of the rules on Marcy can easily lead to the next step which is a complete ban of dogs on Marcy for everybody.

I love my dogs and wish I never had to leash them. But unfortunately we don't live in a world where that is possible. It is much easier for authorities to ban dogs altogether rather than to deal with problems/complaints arising from improperly supervised dogs.
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glenn
glenn

November 2nd, 2000, 11:58 pm #9

How did dogs go from being our best friend to our worst friend so quickly? What is the reason for this new regulation? Environmental? Public safety? Animal protection? These anti-dog regulations are popping up everywhere.

I went camping and hiking in Central Pennsylvania this weekend and found out that you can't have dogs in overnight areas is any State Park there -- NOT even on a leash! It's OK to take in a sound system, a half-of-side of beef, and a ton of trash, but don't take your dog!



last summer at myrtle beach i really enjoyed my neighbor's barking dog. i enjoyed his barking all night for three nights. DOGS BELONG AT HOME!!
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