Kill Your Partner

Kill Your Partner

roger
roger

August 31st, 2001, 3:00 pm #1

rec.climbing has a thread discussing the merits of killing your partner (inspired by the scene from Vertical Limit).

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&s ... c.climbing
Excerpts:

Say you're in Simon Yates position, badly injurned partner dangling on
the wrong end of the rope tied to your harness. The ledge yer standin
on is fallin apart. Yer gonna die!

Do you cut the rope?
----------------
No, I cut the scene and ask for the screenplay writer to come up with a more
plausible scenario.
-----------
Yes, I cut the rope. As does the vast majority of people in the world.
Yates was in deep trouble, and it only would have gotten worse had he been
yanked from his belay seat.

Probably the most inspirational story I've ever read. "Alive" and
"Endurance" were more impressive in many respects, but Simpson was alone and
severely injured. that's what separates him from all others.
--------------

You arn't an authentic climber unless you have given someone "the chop."
"The chop", separates the men from the boys, in the climbing universe.
--------------
This is a case where the two survived and the story is not twisted .
How many cases are there, where the rope was cut (or the friend left
behind/the oxy 'empty'/ the tent kept closed....)and after that nobody
knows a thing about it?
I know a story of a everest expedition where one sherpa lost his live.
In the media, the climber who was with him, was almost a heroe because
of the 'efforts' he did for saving his life. We, the peers/climbing
community know it was his fault that he died because he went up with a
sick sherpa and not to give oxy because he neede it for getting up the
mountain himself.
----------
I would not kill my partner. At least not while sitting here
in my sunny office. But if that sonofabitch drinks another
drop of my water without asking... I'm gonna plant this
hammer in his skull!

Ever offer a thirsty partner a drink of water and the dude
empties your bottle? Is THAT a killing offense?

Climbing rule number xxx. - Always leave at least a swallow
of water in your partners water bottle, even if they say
"kill it." Trust me on this.
--------------
Dude! What a great idea for a movie! Maybe someone could be on an
expedition up Everest or Annapurna or something, and then a couple of people
get caught in a crevasse. They all start dying of AMS, and need to ration
out their hi-tech Anti-High-Altitude serum. Except that this one guy is
real evil, and takes the serum from another guy who's real sick,
intentionally killing him. Then this other girl who's also in the crevasse
finds out and gets into a fight with him, and he finally falls down in the
crevasse and dies, and finally her brother comes up and saves her by
blasting her out of the crevasse with some TNT or something.

We could call the movie "Vertical Boundary."
----------------
I would much prefer the fighting to be substituted with gratuitous sex
scenes.
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Anthony Harris
Anthony Harris

September 26th, 2001, 2:57 am #2

It's a toss up. As in the case of Vertical Limit the two scenes wher the son cuts the rope on his father to save his sister and himself you can think about it as one person dying is better than three. Then the scene where the hard-core climber cuts the rope on himself and that ass hole billionare to save the National Geographic photographer and his sister in my oppion is one of the most nobble things you could do. For you optimists two deaths is better than four. But, no deaths is even better.
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roger
roger

January 20th, 2002, 6:36 am #3

rec.climbing has a thread discussing the merits of killing your partner (inspired by the scene from Vertical Limit).

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&s ... c.climbing
Excerpts:

Say you're in Simon Yates position, badly injurned partner dangling on
the wrong end of the rope tied to your harness. The ledge yer standin
on is fallin apart. Yer gonna die!

Do you cut the rope?
----------------
No, I cut the scene and ask for the screenplay writer to come up with a more
plausible scenario.
-----------
Yes, I cut the rope. As does the vast majority of people in the world.
Yates was in deep trouble, and it only would have gotten worse had he been
yanked from his belay seat.

Probably the most inspirational story I've ever read. "Alive" and
"Endurance" were more impressive in many respects, but Simpson was alone and
severely injured. that's what separates him from all others.
--------------

You arn't an authentic climber unless you have given someone "the chop."
"The chop", separates the men from the boys, in the climbing universe.
--------------
This is a case where the two survived and the story is not twisted .
How many cases are there, where the rope was cut (or the friend left
behind/the oxy 'empty'/ the tent kept closed....)and after that nobody
knows a thing about it?
I know a story of a everest expedition where one sherpa lost his live.
In the media, the climber who was with him, was almost a heroe because
of the 'efforts' he did for saving his life. We, the peers/climbing
community know it was his fault that he died because he went up with a
sick sherpa and not to give oxy because he neede it for getting up the
mountain himself.
----------
I would not kill my partner. At least not while sitting here
in my sunny office. But if that sonofabitch drinks another
drop of my water without asking... I'm gonna plant this
hammer in his skull!

Ever offer a thirsty partner a drink of water and the dude
empties your bottle? Is THAT a killing offense?

Climbing rule number xxx. - Always leave at least a swallow
of water in your partners water bottle, even if they say
"kill it." Trust me on this.
--------------
Dude! What a great idea for a movie! Maybe someone could be on an
expedition up Everest or Annapurna or something, and then a couple of people
get caught in a crevasse. They all start dying of AMS, and need to ration
out their hi-tech Anti-High-Altitude serum. Except that this one guy is
real evil, and takes the serum from another guy who's real sick,
intentionally killing him. Then this other girl who's also in the crevasse
finds out and gets into a fight with him, and he finally falls down in the
crevasse and dies, and finally her brother comes up and saves her by
blasting her out of the crevasse with some TNT or something.

We could call the movie "Vertical Boundary."
----------------
I would much prefer the fighting to be substituted with gratuitous sex
scenes.
When you need an extra dose of testastarone here's an Observer of two climbing books:
http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/ ... 91,00.html

The Beckoning Silence
Joe Simpson
Douglas Haston - The Philosophy of Risk
Jeff Connor
Canongate £16.99, pp212

Simpson's is by far the better book and Simpson by far the better writer. And it is not just that when it comes to near death and survival against the odds Simpson knows what he is talking about. Simpson has a better feel for how people work.
He was the young climber cut from his rope by his partner Simon Yates in extremis as both were being pulled from a South American mountain. Badly injured, with a shattered leg, Simpson survived the fall into a crevasse and crawled almost six miles along the Pachermo glacier to where his friends were packing up camp convinced that he was dead. That episode was described in his brilliant and award winning debut Touching the Void, the climbing classic to which this is a kind of sequel.
There have been other books, two novels and This Game of Ghosts, an account of previous adventures and mishaps in the mountains. Now this.
The Beckoning Silence purports to be Simpson's farewell to difficult mountaineering, having rejected the whole living-life-dangerously-is-good philosophy. Now in his forties, he tells us, his legs aren't what they were. A close friend dies, and he is touched by the deaths of others. Uncertainty and fear creep in and Joe wonders whether to pack it all in.
In climbing parlance there are routes and 'chop routes' - a category of climb so loose or of such technical difficulty (and difficulty to protect against a fall) that death and serious injury are a serious possibility. In Alpine terms the North Face of the Eiger - for long associated with tragedy - is the daddy of all 'chop routes'. Although no longer regarded as terribly difficult, it is still a fact that more than 60 climbers have died on a face exposed to fearsome storms and a barrage of constant rock-falls in summer.

Note: I do not see it listed on Amazon/ But here's a linkl for Touching the Void
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/ ... asroofoutf/
===============


Jeff Connor's biography of Haston, a book long overdue. Haston was one of the superstars of the golden era of British mountaineering from the mid-Sixties to the mid-Seventies when big business and the media still sponsored 'national' expeditions at huge cost and the BBC could spend two days televising the ascent of a 400ft Scottish sea stack, the Old Man of Hoy.
By all accounts he was an unpleasant piece of work - self-centred and vain - who didn't give a damn about the consequences of his actions on anyone else, even those closest to him. To cap it all he bought the Nietzsche thing wholesale, sneering at practically everyone for failing to live up to his standards and signing his diaries 'Thus Spake DH'.
Connor's biography does little to dispel this impression. And there is the problem. Connor set out to write a biography of a 'climbing hero' and in his spadework has uncovered a monster who used Nietzsche to justify some pretty terrible behaviour. It is a book full of damning detail, none less than the discovery that Haston persuaded his wife Annie to get herself sterilised because he could not bear the idea of children with her, but was frightened of a vasectomy.
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roger
roger

February 5th, 2002, 3:22 pm #4

Mountaineers are an
iconoclastic bunch who do not
share the values of the rest of
humankind. A well-paid job, a steady
love life, as few brushes with death as
possible – these seem fripperies to
climbing's vanguard. Vanity, however, is
common to all.

Eiger hero Heinrich Harrer was flattered
to be played by Brad Pitt when
Hollywood filmed the Austrian's
autobiographical work, Seven Years, in
Tibet. It certainly must have gone down
better at polite dinner tables than being
fêted by Hitler after success on the
Eigerwand in 1938. Joe Simpson was
similarly chuffed when he heard that Tom
Cruise wanted to make him a star in a
film of his 1987 bestseller Touching the
Void. The Sheffield climber's initial
reaction to the news was a typically
forthright "bloody Nora". The deal was
signed at Paramount, and Simpson flew
home from LA, trying to drink the
first-class galley dry. Now, sadly, Cruise
as Simpson is not to be.

The problem for film-makers is that this
story has only two characters: Simpson
and his partner on Siula Grande in the
Peruvian Andes, Simon Yates. After
climbing the west face, Simpson
smashes a knee in a fall. As the descent
turns into a nightmare, Yates, if he is to
live, has no choice but to cut the rope
that links them. Simpson plummets into
a crevasse where, by all natural laws, he
should be entombed to this day.
Incredibly, he claws his way out of the
ice and crawls for miles over glacier,
rocks and thorns – back from the dead.

Viewed with heartless hindsight, when
Yates took his knife to the rope he was
dispatching his partner to fame and
fortune. Touching the Void has been
translated into 14 languages and sold
more than a million copies. Simpson has
become a celebrity but, as The
Beckoning Silence reveals, a tortured
one.
http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/book ... ory=118227
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roger
roger

March 1st, 2002, 2:47 pm #5

When you need an extra dose of testastarone here's an Observer of two climbing books:
http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/ ... 91,00.html

The Beckoning Silence
Joe Simpson
Douglas Haston - The Philosophy of Risk
Jeff Connor
Canongate £16.99, pp212

Simpson's is by far the better book and Simpson by far the better writer. And it is not just that when it comes to near death and survival against the odds Simpson knows what he is talking about. Simpson has a better feel for how people work.
He was the young climber cut from his rope by his partner Simon Yates in extremis as both were being pulled from a South American mountain. Badly injured, with a shattered leg, Simpson survived the fall into a crevasse and crawled almost six miles along the Pachermo glacier to where his friends were packing up camp convinced that he was dead. That episode was described in his brilliant and award winning debut Touching the Void, the climbing classic to which this is a kind of sequel.
There have been other books, two novels and This Game of Ghosts, an account of previous adventures and mishaps in the mountains. Now this.
The Beckoning Silence purports to be Simpson's farewell to difficult mountaineering, having rejected the whole living-life-dangerously-is-good philosophy. Now in his forties, he tells us, his legs aren't what they were. A close friend dies, and he is touched by the deaths of others. Uncertainty and fear creep in and Joe wonders whether to pack it all in.
In climbing parlance there are routes and 'chop routes' - a category of climb so loose or of such technical difficulty (and difficulty to protect against a fall) that death and serious injury are a serious possibility. In Alpine terms the North Face of the Eiger - for long associated with tragedy - is the daddy of all 'chop routes'. Although no longer regarded as terribly difficult, it is still a fact that more than 60 climbers have died on a face exposed to fearsome storms and a barrage of constant rock-falls in summer.

Note: I do not see it listed on Amazon/ But here's a linkl for Touching the Void
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/ ... asroofoutf/
===============


Jeff Connor's biography of Haston, a book long overdue. Haston was one of the superstars of the golden era of British mountaineering from the mid-Sixties to the mid-Seventies when big business and the media still sponsored 'national' expeditions at huge cost and the BBC could spend two days televising the ascent of a 400ft Scottish sea stack, the Old Man of Hoy.
By all accounts he was an unpleasant piece of work - self-centred and vain - who didn't give a damn about the consequences of his actions on anyone else, even those closest to him. To cap it all he bought the Nietzsche thing wholesale, sneering at practically everyone for failing to live up to his standards and signing his diaries 'Thus Spake DH'.
Connor's biography does little to dispel this impression. And there is the problem. Connor set out to write a biography of a 'climbing hero' and in his spadework has uncovered a monster who used Nietzsche to justify some pretty terrible behaviour. It is a book full of damning detail, none less than the discovery that Haston persuaded his wife Annie to get herself sterilised because he could not bear the idea of children with her, but was frightened of a vasectomy.
Outdoors Magic Review of Beckoning Silence
The Beckoning Silence takes the reader from iffy icefall climbing in the French Alps, via Bridalveil Falls in the Rockies to the harrowing climax of the book on the Nordwand itself. As always Simpson is immensely readable and, as so often, he dons his cape as the Nick Hornby of mountaineering literature.
Unlike most climbing writers and his own heroes, who are dotted through the book, Simpson is relentlessly honest and racked with self doubt. His two greatest strengths are the unsheathing of the insecurities and thought processes that most climbers go through, but stash safely away from view, and a gift for vividly describing the sensations and mechanics of climbing.
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/article.asp?UAN=1292

Other Outdoors Magic links:

Joe Simpson Interviewed
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/article.asp?UAN=1292

Joe Simpson on climbing waterfall ice
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/artic ... =1&UAN=488


Joe Simpson On Surviving Till 40
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/artic ... =1&UAN=265
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roger
roger

August 20th, 2002, 1:04 pm #6

The good news though is that production company Darlow Smithson are making a drama documentary of the book for Channel 4 with Joe and Simon Yates. Simpson has just returned from filming in Peru and will be working on more filming, stunts and reconsturction in the alps later this summer.
The film apparently has a £1.5 million budget and will last either 90 or 120 minutes. Initially it's scheduled for limited release in the cinema, but after the Cannes Film Festival should be released on television, though exact dates aren't yet available.
Meanwhile Joe Simpson is, as he promised, returning this week for another attempt on the North Face of the Eiger.
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/article.asp?UAN=1581

You can read an excerpt for free (and the buy book)
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/ ... asroofoutf/
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