Is Guadalupe Part of the Rockies?

Is Guadalupe Part of the Rockies?

roger
roger

November 7th, 2003, 5:02 pm #1

Do you consider Guadalupe part of the Rockies? I always assumed it was but somebody asked because they were wondering about the famous claim of Harney being the highest peak in the Lower 48 east of the Rockies.
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Surgent
Surgent

November 7th, 2003, 6:31 pm #2

Quick look at a map indicates Harney may still be east of Guadalupe, going by longitude. So yes, and yes.

(Many of the Texas Ranges, including those down by the Big Bend such as the Chisos and Chinatis, are sometimes considered the southernmost extension of the Rockies, based on geological criteria. However, I wonder if there is an "official" consensus on this)
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Olivier Kozlowski
Olivier Kozlowski

November 7th, 2003, 6:45 pm #3

(Puts on geology hat that just qualifies me enough to ask stupid questions)

Guadalupe is a fossilized coral reef, is it not? If it's made up of different stuff (technical geology term there) than the Rockies, can it really be considered part of the Rockies?

(Removes geologist-with-absolutely-no-training hat)
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Surgent
Surgent

November 7th, 2003, 10:10 pm #4

Guadalupe is a fossilized coral reef, is it not? If it's made up of different stuff (technical geology term there) than the Rockies, can it really be considered part of the Rockies?

It's not necessarily coral (or just coral). It is largely a mountain range of limestone (hence the caves, caverns and cliffs). It very well probably has a different history than the Rockies. Geographically, however, they might get lumped in with the Rockies, if one casts a wide net.

The other ranges in Texas are much more volcanic in origin. I guess one can consider the Rockies, the peaks in Mexico and the Andes as one monster range.

Anyone with a better geology background (Fred?) feel free to jump in. I'd like to know, too.
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Lynn Arave
Lynn Arave

November 7th, 2003, 10:32 pm #5

Do you consider Guadalupe part of the Rockies? I always assumed it was but somebody asked because they were wondering about the famous claim of Harney being the highest peak in the Lower 48 east of the Rockies.
I've learned the hard way that there's isn't always a definitive answer to such queries.
That's because the answer can be different according to the geological and the geographical points of view.
For example, are Utah's Wasatch Mountains part of the Rocky Mountains?
Yes, by geography standards, but a firm no by geology.
The Wasatch is a geographical segment of the Rocky Mountains, but in geology terms they are very separate and distinct.
What's on maps usually dominate and they are usually done by the geographical point of view, but that doesn't satisy many geologists.
I don't know much about Guadalupe, but it may be a similar situation.

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Joined: November 14th, 2003, 8:27 pm

November 14th, 2003, 8:27 pm #6

Guadalupe is a fossilized coral reef, is it not? If it's made up of different stuff (technical geology term there) than the Rockies, can it really be considered part of the Rockies?

It's not necessarily coral (or just coral). It is largely a mountain range of limestone (hence the caves, caverns and cliffs). It very well probably has a different history than the Rockies. Geographically, however, they might get lumped in with the Rockies, if one casts a wide net.

The other ranges in Texas are much more volcanic in origin. I guess one can consider the Rockies, the peaks in Mexico and the Andes as one monster range.

Anyone with a better geology background (Fred?) feel free to jump in. I'd like to know, too.
Here is the official word from the National Park Service for those interested. Looks like they formed in a seperate event from the Rockies. Follow this link for more information...http://www.nps.gov/gumo/gumo/geology.html
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roger
roger

November 14th, 2003, 8:42 pm #7

Thanks for the link (and good answer).

Here's some pertinent info:

The Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary periods were geologically eventful in the West. The Rocky Mountains, which were uplifted about 50 to 100 million years ago, extend from southern Colorado northwest to the Canadian border. Their rocks and topography are diverse and highly complex. Many of the individual ranges that make up the Rocky Mountains appear on maps as variously shaped bull's-eyes surrounding a center. Each crudely ringed pattern was created by the Tertiary erosion of Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks that once overlay and now surround a core of uplifted Precambrian granite.

http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/LivingWith/Vo ... tains.html

About 26 million years ago, faulting occurred in this area uplifting this long-buried portion of the Capitan Reef nearly two miles from its original position. This uplifted block was then exposed to wind and rain causing the softer overlying sediments to be eroded until the resistant reef was uncovered. Today the reef towers above the desert floor as it once dominated the floor of the Delaware Sea 250 million years ago.
http://www.nps.gov/gumo/gumo/geology.html
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Joined: November 14th, 2003, 8:27 pm

November 14th, 2003, 8:47 pm #8

Do you consider Guadalupe part of the Rockies? I always assumed it was but somebody asked because they were wondering about the famous claim of Harney being the highest peak in the Lower 48 east of the Rockies.
The US Geological Survey has this link http://wrgis.wr.usgs.gov/docs/usgsnps/p ... kymtn.html
and says that the Rockies end in Central New Mexico. Which makes sense since the mountains in Texas were formed earlier than the Rocky Mountain uplift...due to deposition of different materials. They include the Guadalupe region in the Basin and Range province. Sounds convincing to me...another interesting link is http://wrgis.wr.usgs.gov/docs/usgsnps/p ... rktec.html which lists parks by geological region.

Enjoy!
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McPike
McPike

November 15th, 2003, 2:45 am #9

Do you consider Guadalupe part of the Rockies? I always assumed it was but somebody asked because they were wondering about the famous claim of Harney being the highest peak in the Lower 48 east of the Rockies.
Although the Appalachian Mountains extend from Maine on down to Georgia, the US Government defines Appalachia (the cultural aspect)extending in to parts of NY, Ohio, Kentucky and as far over to Alabama Mississippi. I'll see if I can find the web site that talks about this.

Don't know why these postings made me think of this specific topic.
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TJ
TJ

November 26th, 2003, 3:01 pm #10

Do you consider Guadalupe part of the Rockies? I always assumed it was but somebody asked because they were wondering about the famous claim of Harney being the highest peak in the Lower 48 east of the Rockies.
My Hammond Headline World Atlas list Guadalupe as part of the Rockies, so it depends on who you ask. Isn't Glacier National Park a fossilized coral reef too?
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