India/Pakistan in First Face to Face Meeting at Everest Resort

India/Pakistan in First Face to Face Meeting at Everest Resort

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January 2nd, 2002, 2:11 pm #1

Indian and Pakistani foreign ministers will sit at the same table tomorrow for the first time since the dispute over Islamic militant attacks on India's Parliament pushed the nuclear neighbours to the brink of war.

The Nepalese hosts had feared that the tension might force the cancellation of the SAARC summit for a third year. They expressed hope that a retreat for the leaders on Saturday at the village of Nagarkot, with a view of the Himalayan range and Mount Everest, might be conducive to talks.
http://www.online.ie/news/latest_world/ ... le=1623524
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January 22nd, 2002, 9:15 pm #2

Following a 93-percent decrease in mountaineering permits over the last year, Pakistan has announced a 50-percent reduction in peak fees for expeditions. After a record 74 expeditions visited Pakistan in 2001, less than five are still confirmed for this year according to Mr. Ayub Afridi, public relations director for the Ministry of Tourism, Sports, and Culture. The Islamic nation hopes the move will give a much needed boost to its beleaguered tourism industry.


http://www.outsidemag.com/news/headline ... 121_1.html
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February 6th, 2002, 10:25 pm #3

KATHMANDU, Feb. 6 — Maoist rebels fighting Nepal's constitutional monarchy set off a small bomb at a rural airport in the Himalayan kingdom, causing minor damage but no injuries, a police official said on Wednesday.

He said the rebel attack on the control tower at Lukla airport in the Everest region in eastern Nepal damaged window panes late on Monday. News of the attack took some time to filter out because the bombing occurred in such a remote area.
''There is no report of any injury,'' police official Rajendra Bahadur Singh told Reuters.
Lukla is a gateway to the world's highest peak, Mount Everest, and the scenic Khumbhu region, both popular destinations for thousands of Western climbers and hikers.

http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/re ... p?reg=ASIA
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February 6th, 2002, 10:27 pm #4

Following a 93-percent decrease in mountaineering permits over the last year, Pakistan has announced a 50-percent reduction in peak fees for expeditions. After a record 74 expeditions visited Pakistan in 2001, less than five are still confirmed for this year according to Mr. Ayub Afridi, public relations director for the Ministry of Tourism, Sports, and Culture. The Islamic nation hopes the move will give a much needed boost to its beleaguered tourism industry.


http://www.outsidemag.com/news/headline ... 121_1.html
KATHMANDU, Feb. 6 — Nepal's government announced on Wednesday sharp cuts in the fees it charges to scale 60 of its Himalayan mountains, but not for Mount Everest, as a way to attract climbers and support the struggling tourism sector.
Along with Everest, the world's highest mountain, Nepal's other eight popular peaks that are over 8,000 metres (26,250 ft) high are also excluded from the fee cuts.
''As an incentive to climbing expeditions, the government of Nepal has decided to exempt expeditions from 75 percent of the royalty on 40 peaks and 100 percent of the royalty on another 20 peaks,'' the Tourism Ministry said in a statement.
The mountains on the list are not very frequently attempted by climbers and are scattered all across the impoverished country. Royalties currently charged range from $1,500 to $4,000 for an expedition of seven members.
The cuts will start in the Spring season in March and last for three years, the statement said.
The Nepalese government charges between $50,000 and $70,000 for expeditions to the Everest depending on the route taken.

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February 6th, 2002, 10:44 pm #5

Swiss pharmaceuticals group Novartis has put the Ovaltine malt extract drink on the market as part of its programme to divest non-core brands. The group is also seeking to sell the Isostart isotonic sports drink brand and a range of health food and weight-loss products.
Ovaltine was developed nearly a century ago by Berne-based chemist Georg Wander, and has become a favourite night-time drink, particularly in the UK. In 1953 the prominence of the brand was further fuelled when it emerged that Sir Edmund Hillary had taken Ovaltine with him on his successful ascent of Nepal’s Mount Everest. Less than a year ago, Novartis announced it was closing its long-established Ovaltine plant at Kings Langley in the UK to shift production to Neuenegg, near Berne.
http://just-food.com/news_detail.asp?ar ... &app=1&c=1
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April 23rd, 2002, 3:28 pm #6

KATHMANDU, Feb. 6 — Maoist rebels fighting Nepal's constitutional monarchy set off a small bomb at a rural airport in the Himalayan kingdom, causing minor damage but no injuries, a police official said on Wednesday.

He said the rebel attack on the control tower at Lukla airport in the Everest region in eastern Nepal damaged window panes late on Monday. News of the attack took some time to filter out because the bombing occurred in such a remote area.
''There is no report of any injury,'' police official Rajendra Bahadur Singh told Reuters.
Lukla is a gateway to the world's highest peak, Mount Everest, and the scenic Khumbhu region, both popular destinations for thousands of Western climbers and hikers.

http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/re ... p?reg=ASIA
Everestnews item:

http://www.everestnews.com/mak02disp4.htm
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September 3rd, 2002, 2:49 am #7

Indian and Pakistani foreign ministers will sit at the same table tomorrow for the first time since the dispute over Islamic militant attacks on India's Parliament pushed the nuclear neighbours to the brink of war.

The Nepalese hosts had feared that the tension might force the cancellation of the SAARC summit for a third year. They expressed hope that a retreat for the leaders on Saturday at the village of Nagarkot, with a view of the Himalayan range and Mount Everest, might be conducive to talks.
http://www.online.ie/news/latest_world/ ... le=1623524
GENEVA, Aug 30 (AP) MOUNTAINEERS from India and Pakistan today said both governments should end a two-decade standoff in the Himalayas, the world's highest battlefield.
The four climbers, two from each country, spoke to reporters after scaling summits in the Swiss Alps and planting their nations' flags side by side, Harish Kapadia said.
"We've demonstrated that Indian and Pakistani mountaineers can be friends," he said. "When we were climbing, we had no hesitation about putting our lives in each other's hands. Maybe the armies could learn a few lessons" and withdraw from Siachen Glacier.
Nazir Sabir said ordinary people in Pakistan and in India "share a lot of good will."
"When we put our flags on top of mountains in a neutral country like Switzerland, we hoped that would send a message to the governments back home" he added.
The climbers, whose Swiss expedition was sponsored by the International Mountaineering
http://in.news.yahoo.com/020831/20/1una1.html
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