Highpointers in the News

Highpointers in the News

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 25th, 2003, 8:12 pm #1

I will try to post newspaper articles on Highpointers under this thread.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 25th, 2003, 8:14 pm #2

This New Orleans article unfortunately misspells the Louisiana highpoint!
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St. Bernard family of hikers gets in peak condition
Mountain climbing the perfect challenge
Thursday September 25, 2003
By Rose Marie Sand
Contributing writer
There's no doubt that Phil Gioia Jr. of the St. Bernard community enjoys a challenge.
Gioia, 52, president of the Chalmette Track Club, has competed in almost 100 marathons, including the past 20 Mardi Gras Marathons in New Orleans.
Gioia's vacations even include traveling to compete in races, sometimes several in one trip. While hiking during a vacation in 1999, Gioia discovered a new, even more challenging sport.
During the trip, Gioia and his wife, Janel Mumme, 43, participated in a marathon, followed by white-water rafting, biking and a triathlon in Colorado. To round out the trip, the couple decided to a climb Mount Wheeler, a 13,161-foot peak and the highest point in New Mexico.
After researching on a club called the Highpointers, a group of mountain climbers devoted to climbing to the highest point in each of the 50 states, the couple decided to embark on their own adventure.
Since then, Phil has hiked 29 high points and Janel has conquered 28, often combining hikes in several states on one vacation.
Most recently, Phil and his son, Jason Gioia, 25, climbed Mount Borah in Idaho. The trailhead for the climb was at 7,000 feet, with the summit at 12,662 feet. After a struggle from the start because of sharp rocks, boulder fields, a crevasse called "Chicken Out Ridge," and 13 hours of hard hiking round-trip, Phil Gioia said Borah was his hardest climb so far.
Gioia said he's found that at the summit of a high point is a register and notebooks to sign, and some hikers even leave food and first aid provisions for those who come next.
Including Mount Driskoll, located on private property in Shreveport, the Gioias also have reached high points in Texas, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Florida.
The family is making plans for a 2004 vacation that will include the Highpointers convention in Washington and a climb up Mount Rainier, the state's highest peak.
New Orleans Times-Picayune
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 25th, 2003, 8:28 pm #3

I will try to post newspaper articles on Highpointers under this thread.
John Mitchler passes this along from the cohp group:


A very significant event took place at 9:00AM on Sunday, September 21, 2003. Greg Griffith reached the highpoint of Yellowstone National Park, thus becoming the first person to reach the HP of all national parks in the Lower 48 states.

Greg's achievement is significant and his determination over the past year has been nothing short of astounding.

He did most as solo ascents including Olympus, Goode, and Cleveland, and covered a huge geographic region bounded by Acadia, Virgin Islands, Isle Royale, Saguaro, Channel Islands, and Olympic. This list includes pioneering visits to such unusual park highpoints of Dry Tortugas (kayak), Biscayne (kayak and mangrove thickets), Everglade (wading alligator swamps), and Cuyahoga (new).

His note taking has been exceptional. His visits typically include research at local libraries and ranger stations and he's had lengthy conversations with numerous park personnel, especially for those parks with unclear highpoints (e.g., Canyonlands, Everglades, Biscayne). Repeat visits were required for several, including Biscayne & Everglade (quite a double-drive from Wyoming!).

Greg notes that two of his achievements are asterisked as UFO which means "until found otherwise." The highpoints of Everglades and Canyonlands are still under investigation. He has park personnel researching the highpoint situations there (exact boundaries and manmade features are being questioned).

Greg is Completer #101 of the 50 State Highpoints which he did on Sept. 3, 2000 (see page 3 of HP Club newsletter 00-4, #51).

I met Greg when he joined my Rainier expedition in August 2000 and we reached the summit for his #50, however, at that time he had only visited the highway sign at Jerimoth Hill in Rhode Island. So being a detailed and literal perfectionist, he drove back to RI on an Open Access Date to claim it as his true Fiftieth Highpoint.

Highpointing with Greg is a great experience because you pick up many good ideas about outdoor recreation, let alone enjoy his easy-going style and his love of nature. Although good at it, Greg is not a list-driven climber. He prefers extraordinary events such as retracing the "search for Dr. Livingston" route in Africa and performing a 3,000' rappel on Baffin Island.

[Note about Yellowstone NP HP - Greg took binoculars to the summit of Eagle Peak and carefully examined the Howell Creek route and concluded that it is Class 2 the entire way to the summit. This is preferrable to the Eagle Pass route which is Class 4 or low Class 5 and requires a maneuver through cliffbands and a chockstoned keyhole. The Howell Creek route comes in from Yellowstone Lake. Greg noted 81 entries in the summit register and counted half used the Howell route and half used the Eagle route with more of the latest entries using the Howell route. It was Greg's third attempt at Yellowstone.]

I congratulate Greg on his amazing achievement and a fantastic experience.

- John Mitchler
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Joined: September 26th, 2003, 3:15 am

September 26th, 2003, 3:20 am #4

This New Orleans article unfortunately misspells the Louisiana highpoint!
-------------

St. Bernard family of hikers gets in peak condition
Mountain climbing the perfect challenge
Thursday September 25, 2003
By Rose Marie Sand
Contributing writer
There's no doubt that Phil Gioia Jr. of the St. Bernard community enjoys a challenge.
Gioia, 52, president of the Chalmette Track Club, has competed in almost 100 marathons, including the past 20 Mardi Gras Marathons in New Orleans.
Gioia's vacations even include traveling to compete in races, sometimes several in one trip. While hiking during a vacation in 1999, Gioia discovered a new, even more challenging sport.
During the trip, Gioia and his wife, Janel Mumme, 43, participated in a marathon, followed by white-water rafting, biking and a triathlon in Colorado. To round out the trip, the couple decided to a climb Mount Wheeler, a 13,161-foot peak and the highest point in New Mexico.
After researching on a club called the Highpointers, a group of mountain climbers devoted to climbing to the highest point in each of the 50 states, the couple decided to embark on their own adventure.
Since then, Phil has hiked 29 high points and Janel has conquered 28, often combining hikes in several states on one vacation.
Most recently, Phil and his son, Jason Gioia, 25, climbed Mount Borah in Idaho. The trailhead for the climb was at 7,000 feet, with the summit at 12,662 feet. After a struggle from the start because of sharp rocks, boulder fields, a crevasse called "Chicken Out Ridge," and 13 hours of hard hiking round-trip, Phil Gioia said Borah was his hardest climb so far.
Gioia said he's found that at the summit of a high point is a register and notebooks to sign, and some hikers even leave food and first aid provisions for those who come next.
Including Mount Driskoll, located on private property in Shreveport, the Gioias also have reached high points in Texas, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Florida.
The family is making plans for a 2004 vacation that will include the Highpointers convention in Washington and a climb up Mount Rainier, the state's highest peak.
New Orleans Times-Picayune
there were numerous errors other than spelling, but it's good that highpointing made the news. Glad to see it here too!
Janel
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Paul Z
Paul Z

September 26th, 2003, 9:43 am #5

John Mitchler passes this along from the cohp group:


A very significant event took place at 9:00AM on Sunday, September 21, 2003. Greg Griffith reached the highpoint of Yellowstone National Park, thus becoming the first person to reach the HP of all national parks in the Lower 48 states.

Greg's achievement is significant and his determination over the past year has been nothing short of astounding.

He did most as solo ascents including Olympus, Goode, and Cleveland, and covered a huge geographic region bounded by Acadia, Virgin Islands, Isle Royale, Saguaro, Channel Islands, and Olympic. This list includes pioneering visits to such unusual park highpoints of Dry Tortugas (kayak), Biscayne (kayak and mangrove thickets), Everglade (wading alligator swamps), and Cuyahoga (new).

His note taking has been exceptional. His visits typically include research at local libraries and ranger stations and he's had lengthy conversations with numerous park personnel, especially for those parks with unclear highpoints (e.g., Canyonlands, Everglades, Biscayne). Repeat visits were required for several, including Biscayne & Everglade (quite a double-drive from Wyoming!).

Greg notes that two of his achievements are asterisked as UFO which means "until found otherwise." The highpoints of Everglades and Canyonlands are still under investigation. He has park personnel researching the highpoint situations there (exact boundaries and manmade features are being questioned).

Greg is Completer #101 of the 50 State Highpoints which he did on Sept. 3, 2000 (see page 3 of HP Club newsletter 00-4, #51).

I met Greg when he joined my Rainier expedition in August 2000 and we reached the summit for his #50, however, at that time he had only visited the highway sign at Jerimoth Hill in Rhode Island. So being a detailed and literal perfectionist, he drove back to RI on an Open Access Date to claim it as his true Fiftieth Highpoint.

Highpointing with Greg is a great experience because you pick up many good ideas about outdoor recreation, let alone enjoy his easy-going style and his love of nature. Although good at it, Greg is not a list-driven climber. He prefers extraordinary events such as retracing the "search for Dr. Livingston" route in Africa and performing a 3,000' rappel on Baffin Island.

[Note about Yellowstone NP HP - Greg took binoculars to the summit of Eagle Peak and carefully examined the Howell Creek route and concluded that it is Class 2 the entire way to the summit. This is preferrable to the Eagle Pass route which is Class 4 or low Class 5 and requires a maneuver through cliffbands and a chockstoned keyhole. The Howell Creek route comes in from Yellowstone Lake. Greg noted 81 entries in the summit register and counted half used the Howell route and half used the Eagle route with more of the latest entries using the Howell route. It was Greg's third attempt at Yellowstone.]

I congratulate Greg on his amazing achievement and a fantastic experience.

- John Mitchler
How did he climb Mount Diablo on Santa Cruz island, it is closed to the public on Nature Conservancy land? Also, hope he climbed Crown Mountain(1556 ft.)on St. Thomas rather than Bordeaux Mountain(1277 ft.) on St. John. The park service has a small enclave on top of Crown Mountain. Check it out at Topozone.com
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John M.
John M.

September 26th, 2003, 3:02 pm #6

The HP of chis is not on the restricted Conservancy land. As I said, Greg does his homework well. There are some changes/refinements to the official list in Andy Martin's book. A group of HPers is organizing a blessed visit to the peak you mention, but details are not known at this time.

Greg did both peaks/islands at VI.
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John M.
John M.

September 29th, 2003, 4:55 pm #7

I will try to post newspaper articles on Highpointers under this thread.
Article discusses Johnston family's state highpoint accomplishments.
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John M.
John M.

September 29th, 2003, 9:36 pm #8

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McPike
McPike

September 29th, 2003, 11:32 pm #9

From that article:
"Longacre himself became the seventh person to officially climb all 50 states' peaks in 1985. He now lives on top of a mountain in Missouri, two and a half miles from his state's highest point, Taum Sauk mountain."
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roger
roger

September 30th, 2003, 3:31 am #10

Peak Experience
Talkeetna family conquers highest peak in all 50 states


BY ELIZABETH MANNING • ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS

(Published: September 28, 2003)

Cari Sayre, Dave Johnston and their son, Galen Johnston, from left, have climbed the highest point in all 50 states. The family lives in Talkeetna. (Photo by Stephen Nowers / Anchorage Daily News)

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Sayre and Galen after reaching the 8,749-foot Guadalupe Peak in Texas in July 2002. (Photo courtesy of the Johnston family )

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Galen Johnston at Summit Observatory on 6,684-foot Mount Mitchell in North Carolina on March 4, 1996. (Photo courtesy of the Johnston family)

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Dave Johnston, Cari Sayre and Galen Johnston at the 20,320-foot Denali summit on June 17, 2001. ( Photo courtesy of the Johnston family )

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Galen and Sayre's 50th state peak, Maine's 5,267-foot Mount Katahdin, in October 2002. (Photo courtesy of the Johnston family)

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Click on photo to enlarge
Approximately 14,000 people have climbed to the summit of Mount McKinley. About 1,600 have reached the top of Mount Everest.

Those are select groups when you think of the world's population. But now consider this: Just 123 people have visited the highest spot in each state.

And how many families are among that group? Just one.

Talkeetna climber Dave Johnston, his wife, Cari Sayre, and their son, Galen, now 13, became the first family to visit all 50 high points in the United States last year when they touched the top spot of Maine on the summit of the 5,267-foot Mount Katahdin.

That particular hike capped nine trips to the Lower 48, a decade of effort and an intensive push over the summer of 2002 that had the Talkeetna family criss-crossing the country for two and a half months.

"We drove 17,500 miles, did 14 mountains, walked 315 miles, gained 75,000 feet of altitude (during the hikes), and spent 70 nights camping," Johnston recalled recently as his family shared stories of their summit adventures over a spaghetti dinner in their hand-built Talkeetna cabin.

Anchorage Daily News
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