Has anyone ever climbed all the 14,000+ peaks in the USA?

Has anyone ever climbed all the 14,000+ peaks in the USA?

Anonymous
Anonymous

November 26th, 2003, 4:59 pm #1

Has anyone ever climbed all the 14,000+ peaks in the USA?
Quote
Share

Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

November 26th, 2003, 6:31 pm #2

I'm sure a number of people have climbed the "continental" 14ers - Colorado, California, and Rainier. In fact, someone just finished this set;

http://www.fourteenerworldforum.com/sho ... readid=757
Quote
Share

Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

November 26th, 2003, 6:48 pm #3

Has anyone ever climbed all the 14,000+ peaks in the USA?
No one individual has climbed all of the peaks in Alaska over 14,000 feet. (Peaks defined using the 500-foot minimum prominence rule). Dave Hart is closest and he is missing North Peak of Mount McKinley, East Buttress, South Buttress, Mount Augusta, Aello Peak, Mount Fairweather, Mount Wrangell, and Perch Peak. I am not certain whether he has done Kennedy Peak (aka East Blackburn).
Quote
Share

Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

November 26th, 2003, 7:09 pm #4

I'm sure a number of people have climbed the "continental" 14ers - Colorado, California, and Rainier. In fact, someone just finished this set;

http://www.fourteenerworldforum.com/sho ... readid=757
No one person has climbed all peaks over 14,000 feet in the continental U.S. Remember that Alaska is on the same continent as Colorado, Washington, and California and is, therefore, within the continental U.S.

There are 50 United States, 49 continental states, and 48 contiguous or conterminous states.

Perhaps you meant the contiguous or conterminous U.S., a much easier feat indeed.
Quote
Share

Roger Williams
Roger Williams

November 27th, 2003, 5:28 pm #5

Alaskans call it the "Lower 48", which I prefer having spent 2 years in Barrow. Hawaiians call it "the mainland"; I'm not sure if this includes Alaska.
Quote
Share

pj
pj

November 29th, 2003, 6:21 pm #6

No one individual has climbed all of the peaks in Alaska over 14,000 feet. (Peaks defined using the 500-foot minimum prominence rule). Dave Hart is closest and he is missing North Peak of Mount McKinley, East Buttress, South Buttress, Mount Augusta, Aello Peak, Mount Fairweather, Mount Wrangell, and Perch Peak. I am not certain whether he has done Kennedy Peak (aka East Blackburn).
interesting that its not on his done list -- why do so few people climb this peak? It has such prominence in political geography (being the BC highpoint) and actual geography -- being such a huge mountain near the coast.
Quote
Share

Joined: September 23rd, 2003, 4:11 pm

December 1st, 2003, 4:58 pm #7

'nuff said.
Quote
Like
Share

Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

December 1st, 2003, 7:54 pm #8

No one person has climbed all peaks over 14,000 feet in the continental U.S. Remember that Alaska is on the same continent as Colorado, Washington, and California and is, therefore, within the continental U.S.

There are 50 United States, 49 continental states, and 48 contiguous or conterminous states.

Perhaps you meant the contiguous or conterminous U.S., a much easier feat indeed.
The term "continental" is widely used to describe the "lower 48" states. I recognize that it may not be accurate, but it is part of our vernacular. Its even listed as a definition in my dictionary.

I wanted the post to be clear so I specified California, Colorado and Rainier - the lower 48 14ers.
Quote
Share

Jared
Jared

December 3rd, 2003, 10:47 pm #9

No one individual has climbed all of the peaks in Alaska over 14,000 feet. (Peaks defined using the 500-foot minimum prominence rule). Dave Hart is closest and he is missing North Peak of Mount McKinley, East Buttress, South Buttress, Mount Augusta, Aello Peak, Mount Fairweather, Mount Wrangell, and Perch Peak. I am not certain whether he has done Kennedy Peak (aka East Blackburn).
I was wondering about Gerry Roach, didn't he do all those alaska peaks as well as the lower 48ers? Jared
Quote
Share

Scott Patterson
Scott Patterson

December 3rd, 2003, 11:40 pm #10

In 2000, Gerry became the first person to climb the ten highest peaks in North America. In 2003, Gerry became the first person to climb every major peak over 16,000 feet in North America.

So he's done al the 16,000 foot peaks, but not all the 14,000 foot peaks.
Quote
Share