Gannett and the CDT

Gannett and the CDT

Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

December 13th, 2006, 3:02 pm #1

Does the CDT go by Gannett Peak? I don't have the topo maps of the region, and an online search hasn't turned up the answer thus far.

You'd think that the Continental Divide Trail would come close to a peak that straddles said Continental Divide.
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Joined: September 2nd, 2004, 6:03 pm

December 13th, 2006, 8:52 pm #2

I believe the CDT follows the Highline Trail through most of the Winds. That runs west of the main crest. Here's a map off topozone:
http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=43. ... ze=l&s=200

The Highline/CDT is the red trail on the left running through Three Forks Park, and Gannett is on the right.

Looks like 4 miles as the crow flies. Not sure what the best way would be to climb Gannett if you were going to thru-hike the CDT or Highline Tr.

-adam
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

December 14th, 2006, 4:56 am #3

Does the CDT go by Gannett Peak? I don't have the topo maps of the region, and an online search hasn't turned up the answer thus far.

You'd think that the Continental Divide Trail would come close to a peak that straddles said Continental Divide.
At trailforums.com, there is a forum for the Continental Divide Trail. If you don't already have your answer, i'd try there.

I don't doubt Adam's answer at all, but it's weird to me that my trail map for the winds doesn't refer to the CDT, either for the Highline or any other trail. I guess that's the "flavor" of the CDT, as opposed to the PCT or AT...less official, less worn, you're more on your own.

Planning on hiking the whole thing Olivier??? It's too easy for you, i think. I think you should walk across from your home on the American Discovery Trail first, and THEN link up with the CDT en route to Gannett.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

December 14th, 2006, 3:47 pm #4

Does the CDT go by Gannett Peak? I don't have the topo maps of the region, and an online search hasn't turned up the answer thus far.

You'd think that the Continental Divide Trail would come close to a peak that straddles said Continental Divide.
Well, assuming Adam is correct, it turns out this is basically Jack Bennett's Green River approach, as described here: http://home.rochester.rr.com/tslpag/Gre ... proach.htm

I seem to recall some more recent discussion about conditions on that route (more recent than the 2004 results of searching this site for "Green River approach") but that may have been in the A to Z.

I'm particularly interested in what that last few hundred feet up to the summit are like.

Oh yeah, and what my feet will feel like after following Mark's suggestion! ;-)And my job, and my family (or subsequent lack of both) and...
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Joined: November 1st, 2003, 10:43 pm

December 14th, 2006, 4:00 pm #5

The last few hundred feet up the Green River route to Gannett?
That depends on how comfortable you are with steep rock. When Tom and I climbed it in 1990, we never took the rope out of our pack. But it is quite exposed. Those less comfortable would want to belay. Seems a pity to pack a coil of rope all that way and not use it, but if you need it.....
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

December 14th, 2006, 4:11 pm #6

That was quick! Thanks, Jack.

Comfortable? Somewhat. Experienced? Not so much. Trying to get a sense of what it's like (pics would be great).

Is it solid rock or scree? (You wrote that "one person has described it as a 'gravel pit,'" though you didn't agree.) What class rock would you say?

Thanks again!
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Joined: November 1st, 2003, 10:43 pm

December 14th, 2006, 5:42 pm #7

There is a lot of scree getting up to the col on the continental divide, but the final ridge to the summit is solid rock with good handholds. I'm not much good at ratings, and it was a long time ago, but I would rate the final 200 ft up the ridge as maybe 5.5 YDS.
If you want to discuss further, email me at bennettje@alltel.net (new address).
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

December 14th, 2006, 7:07 pm #8

I've been on Class 3s and a couple short class 4s, and i have a hard time imagining 5.5. That must be like overhanging rock that is smooth as glass, with flying monkeys chewing on your ears, right? Or is that 5.4?
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Joined: September 2nd, 2004, 6:03 pm

December 15th, 2006, 1:25 am #9

At trailforums.com, there is a forum for the Continental Divide Trail. If you don't already have your answer, i'd try there.

I don't doubt Adam's answer at all, but it's weird to me that my trail map for the winds doesn't refer to the CDT, either for the Highline or any other trail. I guess that's the "flavor" of the CDT, as opposed to the PCT or AT...less official, less worn, you're more on your own.

Planning on hiking the whole thing Olivier??? It's too easy for you, i think. I think you should walk across from your home on the American Discovery Trail first, and THEN link up with the CDT en route to Gannett.
I checked my Wind River maps from Earthwalk Press and they mark the CDT as using the Highline Trail.

If you have GoogleEarth installed you might also try:
http://www.phlumf.com/cdt/cdtkml.htm

-adam
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Joined: November 1st, 2003, 10:43 pm

December 15th, 2006, 2:54 pm #10

I've been on Class 3s and a couple short class 4s, and i have a hard time imagining 5.5. That must be like overhanging rock that is smooth as glass, with flying monkeys chewing on your ears, right? Or is that 5.4?
YDS stands for "Yosemite Decimal System," and is a classification for rock climbing. 5.5 YDS corresponds to 4+ SCA. I think it's either 4 or 4+. Something else to relate to: I think the final ridge up Gannett is no harder than the summit knob of Granite Peak, MT. We took rope for both Gannett and Granite, but never took it out for either one. The north ridge of Gannett is, if anything, a little easier than MT.
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