County Highpointing Notes for the Subway Series

County Highpointing Notes for the Subway Series

roger
roger

October 21st, 2000, 4:19 am #1

The folks over in the county highpointers group have dared me to do it.

http://cohp.org

Yes, indeed there are county highpointing connections to New York's Subway Series.

For one thing, Mets Reliever John Franco lives on the very top of Todt Hill. Todt Hill on Staten Island (Richmond County) is New York City's highest natural point and the highest point on the East Coast south of Maine (sorry, Boston, but Bunker Hill doesn't measure up). You will see his house in my 360 panorama from the summit.

http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-si-panorama.shtml

The Todt Hill page is:
http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-statenisland.shtml

The next piece of county highpointing triva is that the Yankees were actually originally named for being highpointers.

When New York investors bought the old Baltimore Orioles in 1903 and moved them to New York, they built Hilltop Stadium near Manhattan's highest point and renamed the team "The New York Highlanders" because of its location in Washington Heights.

Hilltop Park was located at 168th and Fort Washington. The Manhattan highpoint (Fort Washington/Bennett Park) is about a quarter mile away at 182nd and Fort Washington.

You can see a history of Hilltop at:
http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/american/hilltp.htm

You can see my Manhattan highpoint page (along with a 360 panorama) at:
http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-manhattan.html

The history does not stop here.

In 1912 the Highlanders moved a few blocks down to the base of the hill at 159th Street and the Harlem River to the Polo Fields which they shared with the Giants and they lost their "highlander" monicker. A section of the Manhattan highpoint towered over the stadium and is etched in baseball lore -- the legendary Coogan's Bluff.

The Polo Grounds are directly across the Harlem River from the Yankee Stadium (which is at 161st Street) in the Bronx.

You can read more about the Polo Grounds at:
http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/national/pologr.htm

You will probably see lots of shots the Manhattan highpoint and the old Polo Grounds during the World Series.

The Mets played their first season at the Polo Grounds in 1962. There were six subway series played between the Yankees and Giants (1921, 1922, 1923, 1936, 1937, 1951) and seven between the Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers (1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956).
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Stephen Drake
Stephen Drake

October 22nd, 2000, 2:39 pm #2

1906: The Chicago White Sox beat the Chicago Cubs 4 games to 2.

1944: The St. Louis Cardinals beat the St. Louis Browns 4 games to 2. (Note, it took WWII and a depletion of Major League players for the St. Louis Browns to make their only trip to the World Series. The franchise wouldn't make it to the World Series again until the Baltimore Orioles beat the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1966.) I believe the Cardinals and Browns shared the same stadium.

1989: The Oakland Athletics beat the San Francisco Giants 4 games to 0.

The Philadelphia Phillies and the Philadelphia Athletics never met in a World Series. The Phillies have been pretty much a last-place franchise and were the last of the original 16 franchises to win a World Series when they did so in 1980.

Also, the Boston Red Sox and Boston Braves never met in a World Series.

Besides the cross-town/subway city series, there have been 3 other series involving teams from the same state.

1974: The Oakland Athletics beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 4 games to 1.

1985: The Kansas City Royals beat the St. Louis Cardinals 4 games to 3.

1988: The Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Oakland Athletics 4 games to 1.




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roger
roger

October 23rd, 2000, 2:05 pm #3

The folks over in the county highpointers group have dared me to do it.

http://cohp.org

Yes, indeed there are county highpointing connections to New York's Subway Series.

For one thing, Mets Reliever John Franco lives on the very top of Todt Hill. Todt Hill on Staten Island (Richmond County) is New York City's highest natural point and the highest point on the East Coast south of Maine (sorry, Boston, but Bunker Hill doesn't measure up). You will see his house in my 360 panorama from the summit.

http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-si-panorama.shtml

The Todt Hill page is:
http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-statenisland.shtml

The next piece of county highpointing triva is that the Yankees were actually originally named for being highpointers.

When New York investors bought the old Baltimore Orioles in 1903 and moved them to New York, they built Hilltop Stadium near Manhattan's highest point and renamed the team "The New York Highlanders" because of its location in Washington Heights.

Hilltop Park was located at 168th and Fort Washington. The Manhattan highpoint (Fort Washington/Bennett Park) is about a quarter mile away at 182nd and Fort Washington.

You can see a history of Hilltop at:
http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/american/hilltp.htm

You can see my Manhattan highpoint page (along with a 360 panorama) at:
http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-manhattan.html

The history does not stop here.

In 1912 the Highlanders moved a few blocks down to the base of the hill at 159th Street and the Harlem River to the Polo Fields which they shared with the Giants and they lost their "highlander" monicker. A section of the Manhattan highpoint towered over the stadium and is etched in baseball lore -- the legendary Coogan's Bluff.

The Polo Grounds are directly across the Harlem River from the Yankee Stadium (which is at 161st Street) in the Bronx.

You can read more about the Polo Grounds at:
http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/national/pologr.htm

You will probably see lots of shots the Manhattan highpoint and the old Polo Grounds during the World Series.

The Mets played their first season at the Polo Grounds in 1962. There were six subway series played between the Yankees and Giants (1921, 1922, 1923, 1936, 1937, 1951) and seven between the Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers (1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956).
NYC's street grid system is arranged so that the sun can only be seen on the east-west streets between the buildings on the weeks of the spring and fall equinoxes (e.g., the beginning and end of baseball season).

Could the Pyramids or Stonehenge have been better situated?

Clearly the World Series is some sort ancient Pagan ritual that must be celebrated often in New York City (and certainly on the Millenniums).
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

October 23rd, 2000, 3:27 pm #4

Another oddity: some US cities ie Denver and San Francisco have two grids. One runs N-S and E-W while the other runs 45ø to this ie NE-SW & NW-SE. Wonder why they laid out the streets like this. Of course, streets in the old part of Boston supposedly followed old cow paths so run any which way, likewise in Europe.
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Jack
Jack

October 23rd, 2000, 9:30 pm #5

And Washington DC is laid out in a spider-web fashion which has 2 purposes:

1) Assist tourists in getting lost.
2) Making the capitol defendable against a land invasion.

Well #1 happens every day, but #2 only happened once and for reasons that are too complicated to go into here, it didn't work.

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Ed McNierney
Ed McNierney

October 26th, 2000, 1:41 am #6

The folks over in the county highpointers group have dared me to do it.

http://cohp.org

Yes, indeed there are county highpointing connections to New York's Subway Series.

For one thing, Mets Reliever John Franco lives on the very top of Todt Hill. Todt Hill on Staten Island (Richmond County) is New York City's highest natural point and the highest point on the East Coast south of Maine (sorry, Boston, but Bunker Hill doesn't measure up). You will see his house in my 360 panorama from the summit.

http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-si-panorama.shtml

The Todt Hill page is:
http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-statenisland.shtml

The next piece of county highpointing triva is that the Yankees were actually originally named for being highpointers.

When New York investors bought the old Baltimore Orioles in 1903 and moved them to New York, they built Hilltop Stadium near Manhattan's highest point and renamed the team "The New York Highlanders" because of its location in Washington Heights.

Hilltop Park was located at 168th and Fort Washington. The Manhattan highpoint (Fort Washington/Bennett Park) is about a quarter mile away at 182nd and Fort Washington.

You can see a history of Hilltop at:
http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/american/hilltp.htm

You can see my Manhattan highpoint page (along with a 360 panorama) at:
http://www.americasroof.com/nyc-manhattan.html

The history does not stop here.

In 1912 the Highlanders moved a few blocks down to the base of the hill at 159th Street and the Harlem River to the Polo Fields which they shared with the Giants and they lost their "highlander" monicker. A section of the Manhattan highpoint towered over the stadium and is etched in baseball lore -- the legendary Coogan's Bluff.

The Polo Grounds are directly across the Harlem River from the Yankee Stadium (which is at 161st Street) in the Bronx.

You can read more about the Polo Grounds at:
http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/national/pologr.htm

You will probably see lots of shots the Manhattan highpoint and the old Polo Grounds during the World Series.

The Mets played their first season at the Polo Grounds in 1962. There were six subway series played between the Yankees and Giants (1921, 1922, 1923, 1936, 1937, 1951) and seven between the Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers (1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956).
I was surprised to see this comment; is there a standard definition of what "on the coast" means? There are certainly several summits in the Blue Hills (south of Boston) that are higher than Todt Hill. Chickatawbut Hill is 510 feet and is only about 4 miles from the ocean.
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roger
roger

October 27th, 2000, 2:06 pm #7

It's a legitimate concern on defining "on the coast". I find myself correcting lots of people who say it is the highest on the East Coast (thus ignoring Cadillac Mountain et al).

In any event Todt Hill is about 2 miles from the ocean (we're talking ocean not bays).

http://www.mapblast.com/myblast/map.mb? ... yzoom.y=13
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

October 27th, 2000, 5:16 pm #8

I was surprised to see this comment; is there a standard definition of what "on the coast" means? There are certainly several summits in the Blue Hills (south of Boston) that are higher than Todt Hill. Chickatawbut Hill is 510 feet and is only about 4 miles from the ocean.
I, too, have seen the term highest point on the Atlantic Coast applied to Cadillac Mountain. However, I have been unable to locate a definition of "highest point on the Atlantic Coast" that would seem to fit. By definition, Cadillac Mountain is not on the coast (the tide never covers the summit). So, it would seem that the definition applies to points near the coast. How near is near enough to make the cut? How far is too far to make the grade?
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go
go

October 27th, 2000, 5:53 pm #9

don't know the answer to how close is close enough but don't miss a chance to watch a sunset from the top of cadillac mountain. in addition to highpointing i am a sunset "collector" and the best i've ever seen happen there !
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

October 27th, 2000, 8:07 pm #10

One of the best sunsets I ever saw was in late August of 1992. Mount Spurr, a 11,070-foot volcano in the Tordrillo Mountains to the west of where I live, erupted during a westerly wind, spewing ash to over 30,000 feet. The ash cloud blew over my hometown and the particulates in the air caused a hue ranging from purple to pink when the sun was higher in the sky and, when the sun was lower in the sky, reflected the setting sun from below. It was pretty cool.
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