Climbing the Highest Point in Peninsular Florida (Bok Sanctuary)

Climbing the Highest Point in Peninsular Florida (Bok Sanctuary)

roger
roger

June 27th, 2003, 5:45 pm #1

A 205-foot-tall carillon tower hewn from St. Augustine coquina and Georgia marble.
Make-you-stop views from the highest point in peninsular Florida.
Edward Bok, a Dutch immigrant who became a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, intended the 250-acre grounds to be a sanctuary for flora, fauna and the human psyche. Nearly 75 years later, on an unusually tall hill near Lake Wales in Florida's heartland, his dream still rustles the leaves of live oaks and cabbage palms.
He found what he was looking for during his visits to his winter home in Mountain Lake Estates, a ritzy subdivision near Lake Wales. Evenings, he would take walks up a nearby hill, called Iron Mountain, to watch the sunset. At 298 feet above sea level, the elevated earth is the highest in Florida outside of the Panhandle.
Central to Bok's plan was hiring Frederick Law Olmsted, who had already done for landscape architecture what Frank Lloyd Wright did for building architecture. From Central Park to the White House grounds, Olmsted's works would eventually make his name synonymous with his field.
In Central Florida, Bok commissioned Olmsted to turn a wild landscape into a dense, tropical garden that would be a refuge from the harshness of an increasingly industrial world. Thousands of truckloads of soil and scores of plantings later, Olmsted had created what many believe is one of his finest works.
http://www.bonitanews.com/03/06/bonita/d934478a.htm

Bok Sanctuary on Web:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... +sanctuary

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Mark B
Mark B

June 28th, 2003, 5:09 pm #2

I was there in 1996, when it was called Bok Tower Gardens. It's probably a 20-30 minute drive from Orlando and worth a visit if you're in the area.
I approached from the west (Tampa) and the entire ridge with 200+ ft carillon tower makes for a dramatic change in the normally flat Florida landscape.
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Fred L.
Fred L.

June 28th, 2003, 7:15 pm #3

A 205-foot-tall carillon tower hewn from St. Augustine coquina and Georgia marble.
Make-you-stop views from the highest point in peninsular Florida.
Edward Bok, a Dutch immigrant who became a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, intended the 250-acre grounds to be a sanctuary for flora, fauna and the human psyche. Nearly 75 years later, on an unusually tall hill near Lake Wales in Florida's heartland, his dream still rustles the leaves of live oaks and cabbage palms.
He found what he was looking for during his visits to his winter home in Mountain Lake Estates, a ritzy subdivision near Lake Wales. Evenings, he would take walks up a nearby hill, called Iron Mountain, to watch the sunset. At 298 feet above sea level, the elevated earth is the highest in Florida outside of the Panhandle.
Central to Bok's plan was hiring Frederick Law Olmsted, who had already done for landscape architecture what Frank Lloyd Wright did for building architecture. From Central Park to the White House grounds, Olmsted's works would eventually make his name synonymous with his field.
In Central Florida, Bok commissioned Olmsted to turn a wild landscape into a dense, tropical garden that would be a refuge from the harshness of an increasingly industrial world. Thousands of truckloads of soil and scores of plantings later, Olmsted had created what many believe is one of his finest works.
http://www.bonitanews.com/03/06/bonita/d934478a.htm

Bok Sanctuary on Web:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... +sanctuary
Here we have yet another example of an ignorant reporter writing about something he doesn't know anything about.

Iron Mountain, at 298 feet above sea level, is NOT the highest point in Florida outside of the panhandle.

Lake County, only about 50 miles from Orlando, has Sugarloaf Mountain and an unnamed area a few miles south of Sugarloaf, both of which exceed 310 feet in elevation. Pasco County has a small 300-foot contour with a 301-foot spot elevation. Polk County has two areas over 300 feet. There is also a 300-foot contour in Clay County, but it's an aggregate pile in a working quarry, and is thus not a natural feature.
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

June 29th, 2003, 3:32 pm #4

A 205-foot-tall carillon tower hewn from St. Augustine coquina and Georgia marble.
Make-you-stop views from the highest point in peninsular Florida.
Edward Bok, a Dutch immigrant who became a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, intended the 250-acre grounds to be a sanctuary for flora, fauna and the human psyche. Nearly 75 years later, on an unusually tall hill near Lake Wales in Florida's heartland, his dream still rustles the leaves of live oaks and cabbage palms.
He found what he was looking for during his visits to his winter home in Mountain Lake Estates, a ritzy subdivision near Lake Wales. Evenings, he would take walks up a nearby hill, called Iron Mountain, to watch the sunset. At 298 feet above sea level, the elevated earth is the highest in Florida outside of the Panhandle.
Central to Bok's plan was hiring Frederick Law Olmsted, who had already done for landscape architecture what Frank Lloyd Wright did for building architecture. From Central Park to the White House grounds, Olmsted's works would eventually make his name synonymous with his field.
In Central Florida, Bok commissioned Olmsted to turn a wild landscape into a dense, tropical garden that would be a refuge from the harshness of an increasingly industrial world. Thousands of truckloads of soil and scores of plantings later, Olmsted had created what many believe is one of his finest works.
http://www.bonitanews.com/03/06/bonita/d934478a.htm

Bok Sanctuary on Web:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... +sanctuary
Too bad the tower is "not open to the public", according to the link. Wonder if Edward Bok is the father of astronomer Bart J. Bok or Harvard president emeritus Derek C. Bok. I've always wondered if they were related to each other.
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Mark B
Mark B

June 30th, 2003, 12:31 pm #5

The tower is not open to the public because it's an operating carillon bell tower. There's a person (live, not Memorex) who goes up there and plays the carillon bells daily. Or at least, there was a few years ago.
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