California Tale of Why You Use Bear Canisters Instead Hanging Your Food in Trees

California Tale of Why You Use Bear Canisters Instead Hanging Your Food in Trees

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August 19th, 2001, 7:09 pm #1

Here's an item from the Fresno Bee about an bears in Sequoia National Park/Inyo National Forest:
http://www.fresnobee.com/local/story/66 ... 4778c.html

Excerpt:
One of the hikers, who was camping Aug. 9 at Soldier Lakes near Mt. Langley in Sequoia National Park, decided to hang his food in a nylon sack from tree branches. Because he didn't hang the sack properly, he was awakened by a female bear rummaging through his food.

"[The bear] came out of the tree and she basically ran over him," Fister said. "She's been frequenting the area, and she's been known to climb into trees to get food."

The female bear took a swipe at the hiker as she tried to escape. The hiker wasn't seriously hurt and left the park the next day. He reported the incident to the Inyo National Forest staff. Fister didn't know the hiker's name or the extent of his injuries.

A second hiker, camping Aug. 10 at Kearsarge Lakes in the southeastern part of Kings Canyon National Park, also hung his excess food from a tree. Hanging food from trees is not allowed in that area of the park because of the high amount of bear activity, Fister said.

The backpacker woke in the middle of the night to find a bear rustling in the tree with his food. The man yelled and threw rocks at the bear, who came out of the tree, swatted the hiker and ran away.

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roger
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August 20th, 2001, 3:49 pm #2

I was astonished to see a full page on "bear safety essentials" in a surburban New York City weekly newspaper on Long Island.

I can't even speculate on when the last bear was seen on Long Island.

The ad has half page picture of a bear and then two smaller drawings.

One of which is captioned "Black Bear - No Hump - "roman" (straight) profile - shorter front claws

The second is "Grizzly Bear" - shouldere hump - "dish shape (concave) profile - longer front claws.

The third shows a man with a pack lying prostrate and captions "How to Play Dead - Lie belly down, hands clapsed behind neck, armcs covering face and side ofc head. Keep legs spread to avoid being rolled. Do not scream."

The ad is headlined "Bear Safety Essential! Play dead or punch bear in snout?"

The copy

Stay calm. When confronting a bear, your best weapon is your mind. Don't lose it.

1. Assess.
Does the bear see you as a threat or a eal? Its motives--defenseive or predatitory will determine your strategy.

2. Black Bear or Grizzly?
If the bear's motives are uncelar, determine its specicies. Most grizzly attacks are defensive, most black bear attacks predatory.

3. If Grizzly, Play Dead.
A defensive bear attacks to neutralize a threat. Do not provoke it.
A. Don't run. Sudden movements threaten. Besides, a bear can run as fast as horse (and you cannot).
B. Don't Make Eye Contact. Do watch the bear closely.
C. Slowly Back Away, gently waving arms and talking in an even voice. The bear take you for you really are -- a sorry human -- and let you off.
D. Distract the Bear by tossing food or gear (an expensive camera, for example) away from yourself. Don't drop your pack -- it could protect you if attacked.
E. Play Dead. If the bear is about to contact, drop to the ground. Lie chest down, arms covering head, legs spread.
F. Stay on Belly. If the bear tries to roll you, use your legs to stay flat. If rolled, roll back onto your belly.
G. Don't Scream. Be convincingly dead. Howling in pain will only aggravate the bear.
H. Stay Dead. Not forever, of course-just until the bear leaves the area.


4. If Black Bear, Fight Back
A predatory bear atacks if it thinks it can win. Convince it otherwise.
A. Stand your Grownd. Charging black bears often bluff. Make eye contact. State the bear down. Pretend you're not scared.
B. Intimidate Bear. Make noise. Hoot, holler, bang pots and pans.
C. Distract Bear by tossing food or gear from your self. Use the opportunity to find a weapon.
D. Fight back. If the bear makes contact, fenmd it off using any available implement. Can't find anything? Use your fists.
E. Aim for the Face, especially the bear's snout, which is tender and sensitive. Try jamming your fingers in the bear's nostrils. Keep shouting.
F. Don't play dead. To a starving black bear, it's a free meal.




Just Like Investing

Remember, campers. It doesn't matter how well you know the steps if you can't identify the bear. Gather all the insight you can before entering the woods. Or, there will be consequences. Just like there are on Wall Street. As professional investors turn to electronic trading, they risk losing touch with a key resource -- their brokers. Oh, the carnage. But wise investors are turning to Brut's Alternative System. It lets them trade electronically without sacficing their brokers' expertise. Be like those wise investors. Know your alternatives.

=================================

I will not not vouch their bear safety techniques. Apparently this is a national campaign based on the copy at their web site

http://ebrut.com



Last edited by dipper on August 20th, 2001, 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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roger
roger

August 24th, 2001, 1:58 pm #3

Here's an item from the Fresno Bee about an bears in Sequoia National Park/Inyo National Forest:
http://www.fresnobee.com/local/story/66 ... 4778c.html

Excerpt:
One of the hikers, who was camping Aug. 9 at Soldier Lakes near Mt. Langley in Sequoia National Park, decided to hang his food in a nylon sack from tree branches. Because he didn't hang the sack properly, he was awakened by a female bear rummaging through his food.

"[The bear] came out of the tree and she basically ran over him," Fister said. "She's been frequenting the area, and she's been known to climb into trees to get food."

The female bear took a swipe at the hiker as she tried to escape. The hiker wasn't seriously hurt and left the park the next day. He reported the incident to the Inyo National Forest staff. Fister didn't know the hiker's name or the extent of his injuries.

A second hiker, camping Aug. 10 at Kearsarge Lakes in the southeastern part of Kings Canyon National Park, also hung his excess food from a tree. Hanging food from trees is not allowed in that area of the park because of the high amount of bear activity, Fister said.

The backpacker woke in the middle of the night to find a bear rustling in the tree with his food. The man yelled and threw rocks at the bear, who came out of the tree, swatted the hiker and ran away.
Here's a sad story out of New Hampshire:

Excerpt:
Lincoln, NH, 7:34 p.m. EDT August 19, 2001 -- Witnesses to the bear attack say people at The Flume in Lincoln had surrounded the black bear. Some even placed their children next to the animal in an attempt to get the bear to pose for pictures.
The bear eventually scratched and pawed at an 11-year-old boy from Maine and a New York City man. Both were treated at a local hospital for minor injuries. The bear was destroyed by conservation officers.

http://www.thewmurchannel.com/news/924358/detail.html
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roger
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August 24th, 2001, 6:37 pm #4

N.H. motto not for bears
By Brian McGrory, Globe Staff, 8/24/2001
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/236/m ... ars+.shtml


Excerpts:
And now this: That ''Live free or die'' thing is nothing more than a marketing sham. Please read on.

In New Hampshire last week, a group of hikers came across the bear in an area known as the Flume. The bear slowly, gently approached them, sniffed their pockets and backpacks, then pawed at an 11-year-old boy and a man. The injuries, leg scratches, were less than minor, officials said.


A short time later, the park rangers announced that the bear had returned. They herded everyone inside the visitors' center, according to Paul Basken, a hiker who was there with his wife and 8-month-old son. As the bear splashed in a nearby pool, the rangers then hurried people out of the center and back to the parking lot.


Basken and his wife were about to get into their car when they heard a shot ring out. It was, they knew immediately, no tranquilizer gun.

Live free or die? For your average New Hampshire bear, it's not a choice.

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roger
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August 25th, 2001, 5:12 pm #5

Here's an item from the Fresno Bee about an bears in Sequoia National Park/Inyo National Forest:
http://www.fresnobee.com/local/story/66 ... 4778c.html

Excerpt:
One of the hikers, who was camping Aug. 9 at Soldier Lakes near Mt. Langley in Sequoia National Park, decided to hang his food in a nylon sack from tree branches. Because he didn't hang the sack properly, he was awakened by a female bear rummaging through his food.

"[The bear] came out of the tree and she basically ran over him," Fister said. "She's been frequenting the area, and she's been known to climb into trees to get food."

The female bear took a swipe at the hiker as she tried to escape. The hiker wasn't seriously hurt and left the park the next day. He reported the incident to the Inyo National Forest staff. Fister didn't know the hiker's name or the extent of his injuries.

A second hiker, camping Aug. 10 at Kearsarge Lakes in the southeastern part of Kings Canyon National Park, also hung his excess food from a tree. Hanging food from trees is not allowed in that area of the park because of the high amount of bear activity, Fister said.

The backpacker woke in the middle of the night to find a bear rustling in the tree with his food. The man yelled and threw rocks at the bear, who came out of the tree, swatted the hiker and ran away.
The NY Times in its Aug. 24 issue had a front page article on problems with bears in New Mexico.

It is headlined:
Food Shortage in Mountains Sends Hungry Bears to Town
By JIM YARDLEY

Excerpt:
Black bear sightings are fairly routine in mountainous states like New Mexico, and sightings have become more common as homes are built in remote areas. But residents are increasingly anxious as a record number of encounters, some violent, are being reported. Last week, officials blamed a bear for the mauling death of a 93-year-old woman, a rare attack since black bears are not considered predators. This week, a man in Taos, N.M., about 70 miles southwest of Raton, fired at a bear that had broken into his home. In all, more than 60 bears have been shot this year, and at least 20 have been killed by cars.

Ms. Lackey said her office received an average of 100 bear complaints a day.

Just as in Raton, bears are descending into Taos, a ski resort and artist colony. Sheriff Charlie Martinez of Taos County said his office usually received about 10 bear complaints in a summer. In the past two weeks, Sheriff Martinez said, the office has handled about 40 complaints. He said officers found one bear on the roof of a house. In the small community of Questa, a bear was found beside a bank.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/24/natio ... chpv=day01
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ron
ron

August 28th, 2001, 7:43 pm #6

Here's a sad story out of New Hampshire:

Excerpt:
Lincoln, NH, 7:34 p.m. EDT August 19, 2001 -- Witnesses to the bear attack say people at The Flume in Lincoln had surrounded the black bear. Some even placed their children next to the animal in an attempt to get the bear to pose for pictures.
The bear eventually scratched and pawed at an 11-year-old boy from Maine and a New York City man. Both were treated at a local hospital for minor injuries. The bear was destroyed by conservation officers.

http://www.thewmurchannel.com/news/924358/detail.html
I am not a huge animal rights activist, but whoever puts children next to a wild animal, especially a bear, should pay the reprocussions. I feel badly for the child, but not the elder, more "wise" gentleman.
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tom b
tom b

August 28th, 2001, 10:05 pm #7

Here's a sad story out of New Hampshire:

Excerpt:
Lincoln, NH, 7:34 p.m. EDT August 19, 2001 -- Witnesses to the bear attack say people at The Flume in Lincoln had surrounded the black bear. Some even placed their children next to the animal in an attempt to get the bear to pose for pictures.
The bear eventually scratched and pawed at an 11-year-old boy from Maine and a New York City man. Both were treated at a local hospital for minor injuries. The bear was destroyed by conservation officers.

http://www.thewmurchannel.com/news/924358/detail.html
so we surround a bear (A Bear ! Come on people ! A Bear !) and it scratches two humans. Scratches. It could have killed them, and we should all know it. And now it has to be destroyed. Disgusting.
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roger
roger

August 28th, 2001, 11:14 pm #8

Here's an item from the Fresno Bee about an bears in Sequoia National Park/Inyo National Forest:
http://www.fresnobee.com/local/story/66 ... 4778c.html

Excerpt:
One of the hikers, who was camping Aug. 9 at Soldier Lakes near Mt. Langley in Sequoia National Park, decided to hang his food in a nylon sack from tree branches. Because he didn't hang the sack properly, he was awakened by a female bear rummaging through his food.

"[The bear] came out of the tree and she basically ran over him," Fister said. "She's been frequenting the area, and she's been known to climb into trees to get food."

The female bear took a swipe at the hiker as she tried to escape. The hiker wasn't seriously hurt and left the park the next day. He reported the incident to the Inyo National Forest staff. Fister didn't know the hiker's name or the extent of his injuries.

A second hiker, camping Aug. 10 at Kearsarge Lakes in the southeastern part of Kings Canyon National Park, also hung his excess food from a tree. Hanging food from trees is not allowed in that area of the park because of the high amount of bear activity, Fister said.

The backpacker woke in the middle of the night to find a bear rustling in the tree with his food. The man yelled and threw rocks at the bear, who came out of the tree, swatted the hiker and ran away.
Division of Wildlife officials are hunting a bear that scratched a 40-year-old California woman in the face early Monday, causing a cut that took 12 stitches to close.

The incident - officials stress they don't think it was an attack - happened at an illegal campsite near Forest Service land in the Dillon Ranger District.

"The circumstances were identical to the other four where people received other minor injuries," said Todd Malmsbury. "And in each case, the person who was injured was not the one that provided food for the bear. We've been fortunate that no one has been admitted to a hospital."

Each of the four previous incidents has resulted in a bear being shot

Malmsbury said the incident is further proof of an adage Coloradans have become uncomfortably familiar with over the last two years: A fed bear is a dead bear.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,100 ... 49,00.html
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roger
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October 26th, 2001, 3:21 am #9

I was astonished to see a full page on "bear safety essentials" in a surburban New York City weekly newspaper on Long Island.

I can't even speculate on when the last bear was seen on Long Island.

The ad has half page picture of a bear and then two smaller drawings.

One of which is captioned "Black Bear - No Hump - "roman" (straight) profile - shorter front claws

The second is "Grizzly Bear" - shouldere hump - "dish shape (concave) profile - longer front claws.

The third shows a man with a pack lying prostrate and captions "How to Play Dead - Lie belly down, hands clapsed behind neck, armcs covering face and side ofc head. Keep legs spread to avoid being rolled. Do not scream."

The ad is headlined "Bear Safety Essential! Play dead or punch bear in snout?"

The copy

Stay calm. When confronting a bear, your best weapon is your mind. Don't lose it.

1. Assess.
Does the bear see you as a threat or a eal? Its motives--defenseive or predatitory will determine your strategy.

2. Black Bear or Grizzly?
If the bear's motives are uncelar, determine its specicies. Most grizzly attacks are defensive, most black bear attacks predatory.

3. If Grizzly, Play Dead.
A defensive bear attacks to neutralize a threat. Do not provoke it.
A. Don't run. Sudden movements threaten. Besides, a bear can run as fast as horse (and you cannot).
B. Don't Make Eye Contact. Do watch the bear closely.
C. Slowly Back Away, gently waving arms and talking in an even voice. The bear take you for you really are -- a sorry human -- and let you off.
D. Distract the Bear by tossing food or gear (an expensive camera, for example) away from yourself. Don't drop your pack -- it could protect you if attacked.
E. Play Dead. If the bear is about to contact, drop to the ground. Lie chest down, arms covering head, legs spread.
F. Stay on Belly. If the bear tries to roll you, use your legs to stay flat. If rolled, roll back onto your belly.
G. Don't Scream. Be convincingly dead. Howling in pain will only aggravate the bear.
H. Stay Dead. Not forever, of course-just until the bear leaves the area.


4. If Black Bear, Fight Back
A predatory bear atacks if it thinks it can win. Convince it otherwise.
A. Stand your Grownd. Charging black bears often bluff. Make eye contact. State the bear down. Pretend you're not scared.
B. Intimidate Bear. Make noise. Hoot, holler, bang pots and pans.
C. Distract Bear by tossing food or gear from your self. Use the opportunity to find a weapon.
D. Fight back. If the bear makes contact, fenmd it off using any available implement. Can't find anything? Use your fists.
E. Aim for the Face, especially the bear's snout, which is tender and sensitive. Try jamming your fingers in the bear's nostrils. Keep shouting.
F. Don't play dead. To a starving black bear, it's a free meal.




Just Like Investing

Remember, campers. It doesn't matter how well you know the steps if you can't identify the bear. Gather all the insight you can before entering the woods. Or, there will be consequences. Just like there are on Wall Street. As professional investors turn to electronic trading, they risk losing touch with a key resource -- their brokers. Oh, the carnage. But wise investors are turning to Brut's Alternative System. It lets them trade electronically without sacficing their brokers' expertise. Be like those wise investors. Know your alternatives.

=================================

I will not not vouch their bear safety techniques. Apparently this is a national campaign based on the copy at their web site

http://ebrut.com


BOZEMAN - Researchers spotted a record number of breeding grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park this year, says a new report from the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team.

As of Oct. 17, team researchers counted 42 female grizzlies with cubs born this year. The previous high was 35 sows with cubs, numbers recorded in 1998 and 2000, the report says.

Observers also counted 78 cubs with the sows, also a record.

However, the report also noted the number of female bears killed by people soared to a level unseen in 20 years.

So far this year, there have been 16 known or probably human-caused deaths, the report says. Fourteen of them involved government agents removing bears after they got in trouble with people, usually by eating garbage.
http://www.missoulian.com/display/inn_news/z1.txt
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roger
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October 26th, 2001, 3:23 am #10

Frank Craighead, a world renowned grizzly bear researcher credited with launching the careers of a generation of aspiring biologists and conservationists, died Sunday at the St. John's Living Center in Jackson. He was 85.

In the beginning, they did pull-ups to prepare themselves for tree climbing should they be chased. They crawled into bear dens and observed bruins during every phase of the bears' lives.

Craighead first appeared in National Geographic Magazine in 1937, the publication's editor, Bill Allen, told the Jackson Hole News.
http://www.missoulian.com/display/inn_news/news04.txt

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