another zero

another zero

Joined: January 24th, 2004, 8:34 pm

December 12th, 2007, 7:42 pm #1

It's now been 7 years since I've done a new highpoint (HI in 2000). If you had asked me when I started, in 1992, whether I'd be done in 15 years, I would have laughed. I couldn't have imagined it would take more than 5. But a lot of things get in the way -- kids, jobs, vacations at disneyworld or the beach instead of in the mountains, visiting a great hiking/climbing area instead of the IN highpoint, etc ...

Part of the reason the needle hasn't moved is I've done everything that resembles a "mountain" except for Harney Peak, Mt. Hood (turned around at 9000 ft in 99 due to a storm) and the Big One. It's hard to convince the wife and kids to give up hard earned vacation time driving to fields scattered around the midwest.

My wife thinks its a lost cause, but one of these days, we'll finish the list (she's done 36).
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

December 13th, 2007, 8:16 am #2

Don't sweat it PJ...the highpoints aren't going anywhere. I mean, except Rainier.
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

December 13th, 2007, 1:41 pm #3

It's now been 7 years since I've done a new highpoint (HI in 2000). If you had asked me when I started, in 1992, whether I'd be done in 15 years, I would have laughed. I couldn't have imagined it would take more than 5. But a lot of things get in the way -- kids, jobs, vacations at disneyworld or the beach instead of in the mountains, visiting a great hiking/climbing area instead of the IN highpoint, etc ...

Part of the reason the needle hasn't moved is I've done everything that resembles a "mountain" except for Harney Peak, Mt. Hood (turned around at 9000 ft in 99 due to a storm) and the Big One. It's hard to convince the wife and kids to give up hard earned vacation time driving to fields scattered around the midwest.

My wife thinks its a lost cause, but one of these days, we'll finish the list (she's done 36).
Divorce your wife, give the kids away, quit your job and start walking. Eat off the land and sleep under the stars, kinda like a highpoint survivorman. You should be done in a year or so (except the big one)
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

December 13th, 2007, 1:58 pm #4

It's now been 7 years since I've done a new highpoint (HI in 2000). If you had asked me when I started, in 1992, whether I'd be done in 15 years, I would have laughed. I couldn't have imagined it would take more than 5. But a lot of things get in the way -- kids, jobs, vacations at disneyworld or the beach instead of in the mountains, visiting a great hiking/climbing area instead of the IN highpoint, etc ...

Part of the reason the needle hasn't moved is I've done everything that resembles a "mountain" except for Harney Peak, Mt. Hood (turned around at 9000 ft in 99 due to a storm) and the Big One. It's hard to convince the wife and kids to give up hard earned vacation time driving to fields scattered around the midwest.

My wife thinks its a lost cause, but one of these days, we'll finish the list (she's done 36).
Our highpointing trips became a family event each year. The trip through the South included Disney World and the other Orlando attractions. Our New England trip included Cooperstown and Sturbridge Yankee Village. The upper midwest included Mt. Rushmore and Chimney Rock (the year Nathan studied the Oregon Trail in school). AR/LA included a Christmas season visit to San Antonio and the Riverwalk for my wife.

Sell them to your wife as educational for the kids, plot loops that bags 3 to 7 highpoints and haul 'em all along!

For examples, check the "highpointing" section of my WWW site.

Now, Denali may be a bit of a tough sell...
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:10 pm

December 17th, 2007, 7:59 pm #5

It's now been 7 years since I've done a new highpoint (HI in 2000). If you had asked me when I started, in 1992, whether I'd be done in 15 years, I would have laughed. I couldn't have imagined it would take more than 5. But a lot of things get in the way -- kids, jobs, vacations at disneyworld or the beach instead of in the mountains, visiting a great hiking/climbing area instead of the IN highpoint, etc ...

Part of the reason the needle hasn't moved is I've done everything that resembles a "mountain" except for Harney Peak, Mt. Hood (turned around at 9000 ft in 99 due to a storm) and the Big One. It's hard to convince the wife and kids to give up hard earned vacation time driving to fields scattered around the midwest.

My wife thinks its a lost cause, but one of these days, we'll finish the list (she's done 36).
I started my HP project in 1992, too. I'm at 45. Of my five remaining, three are way the heck back east, the other two are AK and WY. I intend to get at least four of the remaining five... when, I don't know. I'm still enjoying the chase. I went three years w/o a state HP, and now it's been another 1.5 years since my last.

Yes, other things get in the way. I still enjoy the hobby, and feel no compulsion to finish them off 'quickly'.

So don't feel too bad. When the kids are grown you can go get the rest!

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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 17th, 2007, 9:35 pm #6

I've done other mountain lists and when I've finished, I've always been like "what the heck do I do now?" Finishing a list of mountains is bittersweet so I'm in the camp that is enjoying taking my time with the State HPs.
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 11:43 am

December 18th, 2007, 11:26 am #7

I've always collected things since I was a little kid....rocks, stamps, Jim Kjelgaard books, baseball cards, mountaineering books, and now state highpoints. I have often wondered if Highpointers are collectors at heart and if their personalities lead them to collect things. Any other Highpointers that have collecting-related hobbies besides highpoints?

Mark S....your comment about what the heck to do when your finished reminds me of a story that the owner of our local antique store told me. He had a man come in his store who collected old issues of "Fur, Fish, and Game" magazine. He only needed 5 issues and he would have them all. After searching through the pile he found all 5 issues that he needed. He decided to only take one issue, because he did not want his quest to end. The thrill of the chase is sometimes more exciting than finishing the goal.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 18th, 2007, 1:20 pm #8

I used to collect stamps as a kid. Highpointing is sweatier but otherwise pretty much the same.
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

December 18th, 2007, 1:57 pm #9

I've always collected things since I was a little kid....rocks, stamps, Jim Kjelgaard books, baseball cards, mountaineering books, and now state highpoints. I have often wondered if Highpointers are collectors at heart and if their personalities lead them to collect things. Any other Highpointers that have collecting-related hobbies besides highpoints?

Mark S....your comment about what the heck to do when your finished reminds me of a story that the owner of our local antique store told me. He had a man come in his store who collected old issues of "Fur, Fish, and Game" magazine. He only needed 5 issues and he would have them all. After searching through the pile he found all 5 issues that he needed. He decided to only take one issue, because he did not want his quest to end. The thrill of the chase is sometimes more exciting than finishing the goal.
Yup, coins, stamps, rocks, Boy Scout patches as a kid. Still doing the Scouting thing, so another whole box of patches, plus ones that my dad collected as well. State highpoint patches, summit pins, whatever commemorates the location. Fiero toys (including the big one in the garage that I bought new in 1986 and still have). My wife says I have too many tools (impossible). Various and sundry computer "antiques".

Yeah...guess so...

(But then she can't complain too loudly. Her dad played saxophone in dance bands back in the 40s to earn his way through college and kept playing in a local hobby big band as long as he was able. When he passed away, she decided to keep his collection of 200+ sax player figurines (from thumb sized to lawn-ornament-sized) for our son to have, since he is now playing his granddad's sax.)
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Joined: July 31st, 2002, 10:51 am

December 18th, 2007, 4:59 pm #10

It's now been 7 years since I've done a new highpoint (HI in 2000). If you had asked me when I started, in 1992, whether I'd be done in 15 years, I would have laughed. I couldn't have imagined it would take more than 5. But a lot of things get in the way -- kids, jobs, vacations at disneyworld or the beach instead of in the mountains, visiting a great hiking/climbing area instead of the IN highpoint, etc ...

Part of the reason the needle hasn't moved is I've done everything that resembles a "mountain" except for Harney Peak, Mt. Hood (turned around at 9000 ft in 99 due to a storm) and the Big One. It's hard to convince the wife and kids to give up hard earned vacation time driving to fields scattered around the midwest.

My wife thinks its a lost cause, but one of these days, we'll finish the list (she's done 36).
Don't worry about finishing. If you still think about highpointing after 5 years without getting to one, then you must be addicted to the sport.

I finshed 2 years ago (all but AK) and still frequently visit this forum just to find out what other folks are up to. I've moved on to other pursuits but still I'm fascinated with the state highpoints and enjoy reading about other adventures.

Good luck and don't give up!
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