Annual Awards Ceremony for Climbing Northeast 4000 Footers

Annual Awards Ceremony for Climbing Northeast 4000 Footers

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 18th, 2002, 1:07 pm #1

Peakbagging in the Northeast began in the Adirondacks, with Robert and George Marshall and their guide, Herbert Clark. The brothers started climbing in 1916, when Robert was 16 and George 13 years old. At some stage they decided to climb all the peaks above 4,000 feet, and came up with a list of 46 peaks. Only about half of the peaks had trails, and some had probably never been climbed before. They finished their quest in 1925. Gradually other Adirondack hikers started on that quest, and an Adirondack Forty-Sixers Club, (separate from the Adirondack Mountain Club) came into existence.
The criterion used by the Marshall brothers and Herb Clark was that each peak be at least 0.75 miles distant from the nearest higher summit, or that it rise at least 300 vertical feet on all sides. More recent surveys have shown that several of these peaks do not reach 4,000 feet, but the original list is still the one used by the Adirondack 46rs.
In 1957 the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) established a Four Thousand Footers Committee (FTFC) that drew up a list of the 4,000 footer peaks in the White Mountains (NH). The criterion used by the AMC FTFC to define a "peak" is that it must rise 200 feet above the low point of its connecting ridge with a higher neighbor. There are many "peaks" which reach 4,000 feet but do not qualify because of this criterion, they include Clay, Little Haystack, Guyot amongst others.
The FTFC now recognizes three official lists of peaks: the White Mountain 4,000 Footers, the New England 4,000 Footers and the New England Hundred Highest Peaks. The lists are periodically revised to reflect the information on the most current maps.
In addition, Winter awards are given to those who climb all peaks of a list during calendar winter. Obviously far fewer people complete the lists in winter than in the other seasons. Look at the numbers of hikers completing each list to see!
The awards are given out at a meeting usually held in mid-April, in 2002 it will be held (details) at the Cooperative Middle School in Stratham, NH (near Exeter) on April 20th.
http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/bagging.html
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Mark S
Mark S

March 18th, 2002, 5:03 pm #2

Let's not forget the Northeast 111, which is actually up to 115 qualifying mountains. 46 4,000 footers in the Adirondacks plus 2 in the Catskills plus 48 in the White Mountains plus 5 in Vermont plus 14 in Maine equals 115. I may be wrong on this, but I believe new 111ers are recognized at the annual 4,000-footer banquet.
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roger
roger

April 6th, 2002, 7:00 pm #3

Peakbagging in the Northeast began in the Adirondacks, with Robert and George Marshall and their guide, Herbert Clark. The brothers started climbing in 1916, when Robert was 16 and George 13 years old. At some stage they decided to climb all the peaks above 4,000 feet, and came up with a list of 46 peaks. Only about half of the peaks had trails, and some had probably never been climbed before. They finished their quest in 1925. Gradually other Adirondack hikers started on that quest, and an Adirondack Forty-Sixers Club, (separate from the Adirondack Mountain Club) came into existence.
The criterion used by the Marshall brothers and Herb Clark was that each peak be at least 0.75 miles distant from the nearest higher summit, or that it rise at least 300 vertical feet on all sides. More recent surveys have shown that several of these peaks do not reach 4,000 feet, but the original list is still the one used by the Adirondack 46rs.
In 1957 the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) established a Four Thousand Footers Committee (FTFC) that drew up a list of the 4,000 footer peaks in the White Mountains (NH). The criterion used by the AMC FTFC to define a "peak" is that it must rise 200 feet above the low point of its connecting ridge with a higher neighbor. There are many "peaks" which reach 4,000 feet but do not qualify because of this criterion, they include Clay, Little Haystack, Guyot amongst others.
The FTFC now recognizes three official lists of peaks: the White Mountain 4,000 Footers, the New England 4,000 Footers and the New England Hundred Highest Peaks. The lists are periodically revised to reflect the information on the most current maps.
In addition, Winter awards are given to those who climb all peaks of a list during calendar winter. Obviously far fewer people complete the lists in winter than in the other seasons. Look at the numbers of hikers completing each list to see!
The awards are given out at a meeting usually held in mid-April, in 2002 it will be held (details) at the Cooperative Middle School in Stratham, NH (near Exeter) on April 20th.
http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/bagging.html
AUGUSTA — The Appalachian Trail Conference has donated 4,000 acres on Mt. Abraham near Kingfield to the state to be maintained as an ecological reserve.
The West Virginia-based hiking and trail maintenance group purchased the land on one of the state's highest peaks from Plum Creek Timber Corp. for $1.3 million. It is the ATC's largest land purchase.
The land lies on the eastern and southern parts of the mountain and runs in a large crescent-shaped arc with its northern tip touching on the Appalachian Trail.
The donated parcel includes portions of the Firewarden's Trail, a popular hiking trail leading up the east side of the mountain.
At 4,049 feet, Mt. Abraham is one of only 13 peaks in the state higher than 4,000 feet. Ten of those are already publicly owned.
http://www.centralmaine.com/news/storie ... abra.shtml
Topo Map:
http://topozone.com/map.asp?lat=44.9722 ... 3888888889
Here's a page on Mount Abraham (with the photo of the cairns)
http://www.n1bug.net/hiking/mtabraham.html
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

April 6th, 2002, 7:49 pm #4

> At 4,049 feet, Mt. Abraham is one of only 13 peaks in the state higher than 4,000 feet.

Currently there are 14 peaks in Maine (and five in Vermont) recognized by the Four Thousand Footer Committee, see New England 4,000 Footers.

Until a couple of years ago there were only 12 peaks recognized in Maine (Mts Spaulding and Reddington were shown to be 3995 feet or something similar on older maps). So clearly the author of that article decided to split the difference!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 7th, 2002, 7:18 pm #5

Let's not forget the Northeast 111, which is actually up to 115 qualifying mountains. 46 4,000 footers in the Adirondacks plus 2 in the Catskills plus 48 in the White Mountains plus 5 in Vermont plus 14 in Maine equals 115. I may be wrong on this, but I believe new 111ers are recognized at the annual 4,000-footer banquet.
I'm curious if there is a shortcut name for naming the 4000 foot peaks in the Northeast.

The West has the 13'ers and 14'ers for their 13,000 and 14,000 foot peaks.

The Southeast has the Sixers for the 6000 foot peaks.

The Adirondacks have the 46'ers meaning the 46 peaks above 4000 (even though there are really only 43 I believe -- there was a mistake at the time the list was set up).

So what's the short abbreviation for 4000 peaks? These lists were easier to manage when they referred to the elevation rather than the number of peaks.
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Mark S
Mark S

April 7th, 2002, 7:48 pm #6

I've heard them referred to as the 4K peaks but there isn't any official 4,000-foot shortcut moniker. Officially, the major peakbagging clubs in the Northeast are named as follows:

Adirondack 46Rs = 46 (actually 42) 4K peaks in the Adirondacks - not including MacNaugton, which has a high contour of 3983 and is believed to be 4000 fett even but doesn't count for squat;

Catskill 3500 Club = 35 3500 foot peaks in the Catskills;

White Mountain Four Thousand Footer Club = 48 4K peaks in the Whites;

New England Four Thousand Footer Club = 67 4K peaks in New England (including the 48 in New Hampshire);

Northeast 111ers = 111 (actually 115 qualifiers) 4K peaks in Maine, New York, Vermont and New Hampshire. Ironically, there are actually 111 4K peaks in the Northeast if you take away the 4 non-4K mountains in the Adirondacks, but don't add in MacNaughton.

New Englands Highest Hundred = the highest hundred mountains in New England (Maine, NH and Vermont).

Confused???? Good. Now try and climb them all.

- Mark Styczynski
Northeast 111er #317
Catskill 3500 Club #1230
Adirondack 46R #3593
No number for NH and NE 4K peaks
Aspiring Highest Hundred climber (86 down)
and a puny 11 state highpoints :-))
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

April 7th, 2002, 10:05 pm #7

I'm curious if there is a shortcut name for naming the 4000 foot peaks in the Northeast.

The West has the 13'ers and 14'ers for their 13,000 and 14,000 foot peaks.

The Southeast has the Sixers for the 6000 foot peaks.

The Adirondacks have the 46'ers meaning the 46 peaks above 4000 (even though there are really only 43 I believe -- there was a mistake at the time the list was set up).

So what's the short abbreviation for 4000 peaks? These lists were easier to manage when they referred to the elevation rather than the number of peaks.
I call them Fours, just try to pronounce 4'er So members of the 111 Club climb the 115 Fours of the Northeast, or if you like, the Northeast Fours, not all of which reach that elevation.

Just a reminder, the Adirondack 46rs climb the 46 peaks that the Marshall brothers and Herb Clark climbed. That list is cast in stone, new maps are irrelevant.

The AMC lists reflect the latest maps, even when the maps are clearly inaccurate. The most notorious case in point is the former inclusion of the N Peak of the Bigelow Horns. At one time the relevant map showed a col of over 200 feet, so it qualified, even though it was clear that the col was much less deep.

Since interpolation is needed to get the elevation of many summits and of almost all the cols it is clear that there is room for error on the marginal peaks.

As Mark said, nothing is simple. A few years ago Hal Graham finished climbing the NH Fours and wanted to continue peakbagging. So he changed the definition, requiring a col of only 100 feet to qualify, and further requiring that only one peak be counted per trip. This is the Trailwright's list of 72 peaks.

Then there are the various lists of 3000 footers, I call them Threes. There are only 176 (I think) Threes in NH, so some eager peakbagger invented the concept of the NH 200 Highest list, which includes many (maybe all, I am not sure) 2,900 footers.

Do you want still more details? If so check my peakbagging page.

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Jay
Jay

April 8th, 2002, 6:52 pm #8

I've heard them referred to as the 4K peaks but there isn't any official 4,000-foot shortcut moniker. Officially, the major peakbagging clubs in the Northeast are named as follows:

Adirondack 46Rs = 46 (actually 42) 4K peaks in the Adirondacks - not including MacNaugton, which has a high contour of 3983 and is believed to be 4000 fett even but doesn't count for squat;

Catskill 3500 Club = 35 3500 foot peaks in the Catskills;

White Mountain Four Thousand Footer Club = 48 4K peaks in the Whites;

New England Four Thousand Footer Club = 67 4K peaks in New England (including the 48 in New Hampshire);

Northeast 111ers = 111 (actually 115 qualifiers) 4K peaks in Maine, New York, Vermont and New Hampshire. Ironically, there are actually 111 4K peaks in the Northeast if you take away the 4 non-4K mountains in the Adirondacks, but don't add in MacNaughton.

New Englands Highest Hundred = the highest hundred mountains in New England (Maine, NH and Vermont).

Confused???? Good. Now try and climb them all.

- Mark Styczynski
Northeast 111er #317
Catskill 3500 Club #1230
Adirondack 46R #3593
No number for NH and NE 4K peaks
Aspiring Highest Hundred climber (86 down)
and a puny 11 state highpoints :-))
There is also a peakbagging list known as the "124 High Peaks of The Northeast."
This list is comprised of several summits that are under 4000 feet but are included because their elevation is greater than that of Couchsachraga, the lowest of the official Adirondack 46er's. Confused? At 3820' above sea level, someone made a serious error in surveying when they included this desolate peak among the 4000 footers.
My rationale that 'lower' is synonymous with 'easier' when sumitting this mountain seven years ago proved to be a very incorrect assumption. The lessons we learn from first-hand experience!

Jay
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Mark S
Mark S

April 9th, 2002, 12:37 am #9

I know of the list to which you refer. It is published in Bruce Scofield's "High Peaks of the Northeast." But, for whatever reason, Bruce left out Sandwich Mountain in New Hampshire, which at 3993 feet is the highest non-4K mountain in the Northeast. Your list of 124 whould actually be a list of 125.
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

April 22nd, 2002, 12:09 pm #10

Peakbagging in the Northeast began in the Adirondacks, with Robert and George Marshall and their guide, Herbert Clark. The brothers started climbing in 1916, when Robert was 16 and George 13 years old. At some stage they decided to climb all the peaks above 4,000 feet, and came up with a list of 46 peaks. Only about half of the peaks had trails, and some had probably never been climbed before. They finished their quest in 1925. Gradually other Adirondack hikers started on that quest, and an Adirondack Forty-Sixers Club, (separate from the Adirondack Mountain Club) came into existence.
The criterion used by the Marshall brothers and Herb Clark was that each peak be at least 0.75 miles distant from the nearest higher summit, or that it rise at least 300 vertical feet on all sides. More recent surveys have shown that several of these peaks do not reach 4,000 feet, but the original list is still the one used by the Adirondack 46rs.
In 1957 the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) established a Four Thousand Footers Committee (FTFC) that drew up a list of the 4,000 footer peaks in the White Mountains (NH). The criterion used by the AMC FTFC to define a "peak" is that it must rise 200 feet above the low point of its connecting ridge with a higher neighbor. There are many "peaks" which reach 4,000 feet but do not qualify because of this criterion, they include Clay, Little Haystack, Guyot amongst others.
The FTFC now recognizes three official lists of peaks: the White Mountain 4,000 Footers, the New England 4,000 Footers and the New England Hundred Highest Peaks. The lists are periodically revised to reflect the information on the most current maps.
In addition, Winter awards are given to those who climb all peaks of a list during calendar winter. Obviously far fewer people complete the lists in winter than in the other seasons. Look at the numbers of hikers completing each list to see!
The awards are given out at a meeting usually held in mid-April, in 2002 it will be held (details) at the Cooperative Middle School in Stratham, NH (near Exeter) on April 20th.
http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/bagging.html
The annual awards dinner took place on Sat. Two special achievements were announced:

1. Ed Hawkins became the second person to have climbed each of the 48 NH Fours in each month of the year. Four others are working towards that goal.

2. Lyn Beadie became the first woman (fifth person) to climb all on the NH 3000 footers (about 170 of them) in winter. More than half of them have no trails, there are no herd paths on these obscure peaks.

I have updated the tables showing how many people completed each of the many lists at:
http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/completers.html
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