8 Blunders for Getting Lost

8 Blunders for Getting Lost

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January 31st, 2002, 4:57 am #1

Outside Magazine has a very good online article on SAR. Here are the eight blunders on getting lost:
1. Fail to pay attention
2. Leave behind the Ten Essentials
3. Don't learn how to read a map and compass
4. Panic
5. Succumb to summit fever
6. Enter a cave without the right equipment
7. Don't tell a responsible person where you're going
8. Move too quickly

Here's the comment on summit fever:

"This is actually a cultural problem," says Daryl Miller, lead climbing ranger at Denali National Park. "The first question everyone, climbers and non-climbers alike, asks after a trip is, 'Did you summit?' Not, 'Did you enjoy the journey?' Weather and other hazards aren't the real problem, they only compound problems that begin with bad decisions that start with pushing for the top."
http://outside.away.com/outside/adventu ... ters_9.adp
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January 31st, 2002, 4:59 am #2

In the Outside SAR profile is a wonderful article on dogs:

Excerpt:
There are more than 2,000 trained SAR dogs in North America, and they often prove invaluable during desperate, time-limited searches. At Fernie, despite ten rescuers frantically thrusting eight-foot probes into the debris pile, they'd turned up nothing by the time Keno arrived 18 minutes later. The dog immediately bolted 30 feet below the probe line and emerged with a leather glove in his teeth. "He's trained to dig like crazy when he finds a person," says Siggers.
http://outside.away.com/outside/adventu ... ters_5.adp
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January 31st, 2002, 5:36 am #3

How many dogs does it take to change a light bulb?

Golden Retriever: The sun is shining, the day is young, we've got our whole
lives ahead of us, and you're inside worrying about a stupid burned out bulb?

Border Collie: Just one. And then I'll replace any wiring that's not up to
code.

Dachshund: You know I can't reach that damned stupid lamp!

Rottweiler: Make me.

Lab: Oh, me, me!!!! Pleeeeeeeeeeeeeze let me change the light bulb! Can I?
Can I? Huh? Huh? Huh? Can I?

Malamute: Let the Border Collie do it. You can feed me while he's busy.

Jack Russell Terrier: I'll just pop it in while I'm bouncing off the walls
and furniture.

Poodle: I'll just blow in the Border Collie's ear and he'll do it. By the
time he finishes rewiring the house, my nails will be dry.

Cocker Spaniel: Why change it? I can still pee on the carpet in the dark.

Doberman Pinscher: While it's dark, I'm going to sleep on the couch.

Boxer: Who cares? I can still play with my squeaky toys in the dark.

Mastiff: Mastiffs are NOT afraid of the dark.

Chihuahua: Yo quiero Taco Bulb.

Irish Wolfhound: Can somebody else do it? I've got this hangover.....

Pointer: I see it, there it is, there it is, right there....

Greyhound: It isn't moving. Who cares?

Australian Shepherd: First, I'll put all the light bulbs in a little
circle...

Old English Sheep Dog: Light bulb? I'm sorry, but I don't see a light bulb?

German Shepherd: Alright, everyone stop where you are! Who busted the light?
I SAID "STOP WHERE YOU ARE!!!"

Hound Dog: ZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzz

and (of course) .. the Cat's perspective,

Cat: Dogs do not change light bulbs. People change light bulbs. So the
question is: How long will it be before I can expect light?
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January 31st, 2002, 4:11 pm #4


OCALA NATIONAL FOREST -- Every year, from October through mid-April, hunters unleash thousands of tracking dogs into the Ocala National Forest, hot on the trail of deer or fox. Some will even set more than a dozen hounds loose at once.

When one of those dogs doesn't come home, hunters are convinced it's no accident.

Hound theft has long been a problem for hunters, particularly in the Ocala National Forest. One woman who says her prized hound was stolen last year estimates that more than 20 dogs have been taken since October, when hunters and their dogs are first allowed into the forest.

They're used by other hunters, they're set free or they are sold.

Hunters drop hundreds of dollars into tracking collars, registration fees and tattoos, but it's not enough.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/loc ... nes%2Dlake

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February 1st, 2002, 11:09 pm #5

In the Outside SAR profile is a wonderful article on dogs:

Excerpt:
There are more than 2,000 trained SAR dogs in North America, and they often prove invaluable during desperate, time-limited searches. At Fernie, despite ten rescuers frantically thrusting eight-foot probes into the debris pile, they'd turned up nothing by the time Keno arrived 18 minutes later. The dog immediately bolted 30 feet below the probe line and emerged with a leather glove in his teeth. "He's trained to dig like crazy when he finds a person," says Siggers.
http://outside.away.com/outside/adventu ... ters_5.adp
READY TO RUN: See Spot Run's Lisalea Latva unloads the 11 dogs that will join her on a Squalicum Mountain hike.

Latva bought the dog-hiking business See Spot Run about 1Þ years ago from the previous owner, who was moving to Texas. She now has 25 dog clients that she takes out in all kinds of weather, unless it's treacherous.
http://news.bellinghamherald.com/storie ... 6778.shtml
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

February 2nd, 2002, 4:43 pm #6

Outside Magazine has a very good online article on SAR. Here are the eight blunders on getting lost:
1. Fail to pay attention
2. Leave behind the Ten Essentials
3. Don't learn how to read a map and compass
4. Panic
5. Succumb to summit fever
6. Enter a cave without the right equipment
7. Don't tell a responsible person where you're going
8. Move too quickly

Here's the comment on summit fever:

"This is actually a cultural problem," says Daryl Miller, lead climbing ranger at Denali National Park. "The first question everyone, climbers and non-climbers alike, asks after a trip is, 'Did you summit?' Not, 'Did you enjoy the journey?' Weather and other hazards aren't the real problem, they only compound problems that begin with bad decisions that start with pushing for the top."
http://outside.away.com/outside/adventu ... ters_9.adp
A slightly different way of expressing the "summit fever" comment is my Rule Number One of climbing:

1. The summit is optional. Returning in one piece is mandatory.

The first corrolary to this rule is then:

1.a) The mountain will still be there next year, but cares not a whit whether you are, or not.

(Yes, I follow my own rules...see the Mt. Ritter section of my homepage if you doubt that I back off a peak under questionable conditions...)

/s/jar (alan.ritter@bausch.com)
http://www.mtritter.org
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