6 Lightning Injuries in Colorado Last Week

6 Lightning Injuries in Colorado Last Week

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 17th, 2000, 2:13 pm #1

I can't find the stories but in rec.backcountry

http://www.remarq.com/list/bkcntry?

There is a discussion about a spate of lightining accidents in Colorado last week -- including a fatality on the Diamond Face of Longs Peak.

The posters note that Colorado is second only to Florida in lighning deaths (4/year)

In addition there is a wonderful post on lightning precautions:

http://www.deja.com/threadmsg_ct.xp?AN=646728008.1


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Alan Bean
Alan Bean

July 17th, 2000, 11:35 pm #2

I was in Colorado last week when some of those fierce storms moved in. We happened to be on South Elbert and we got out of there fast. My wife touched down her trekking pole just before the saddle on the Black Cloud route and received a significant jolt. We had our 18 month old daughter with us so we literally ran down the route. We made a 2,000 ft decent in 25 minutes and were sore, absolutely soaked, and gratefully we didn't get zapped. It was definitely a humbling reminder of how fast conditions can change at that altitude.

Alan
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Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

July 18th, 2000, 12:01 am #3

How late in the day?
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roger
roger

July 18th, 2000, 4:49 pm #4

I can't find the stories but in rec.backcountry

http://www.remarq.com/list/bkcntry?

There is a discussion about a spate of lightining accidents in Colorado last week -- including a fatality on the Diamond Face of Longs Peak.

The posters note that Colorado is second only to Florida in lighning deaths (4/year)

In addition there is a wonderful post on lightning precautions:

http://www.deja.com/threadmsg_ct.xp?AN=646728008.1

I can't confirm if this is true but it is interesting. This was posted in the lightning discussion in rec.backcountry:

http://www.remarq.com/read/bkcntry/

If the clouds look at all like cauliflower, flip on your am radio...at the closest clear channel to am540, you hear the interference caused by lightning out to around 100 miles...at am1760 you will hear only those strokes close enough that if it were night you would be able to see most of them...(your mileage may vary dependant on
radio, antenna type, and experience listening to static)
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Mike
Mike

July 18th, 2000, 7:43 pm #5

I can't find the stories but in rec.backcountry

http://www.remarq.com/list/bkcntry?

There is a discussion about a spate of lightining accidents in Colorado last week -- including a fatality on the Diamond Face of Longs Peak.

The posters note that Colorado is second only to Florida in lighning deaths (4/year)

In addition there is a wonderful post on lightning precautions:

http://www.deja.com/threadmsg_ct.xp?AN=646728008.1

My family and I were backpacking near Breckenridge last week during all the lightning storms.When we left the car it was 65 Degrees and very sunny.At about noon we reached the lower Mohawk lake to partly sunny skies.Within 15 mins past noon.The worst summer storm that I had ever seen was on us.There were several hikers not prepared for what was hitting us.There were several lucky folks at that lake that day.There were strikes all around us.Several people had dogs running loose scared from the lightning another reason dogs should always be on a lease in the back country.We put on rain wear and hats and gloves and huddled down against what was hitting us 2 hrs of pure hell.At lease 3 inches of snow/sheet and ice with approx 50 mph winds,with temps dropping to the mid thirtys.Once that storm passed we got down to a lower altitude and made camp just in time for another storm that lasted all night.Yes every once in a while storms do last for long periods in the high country. We considered ourselfs very lucky that day.We listened to lightning strikes all night long.
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Alan Bean
Alan Bean

July 18th, 2000, 11:04 pm #6

How late in the day?
It was about 2:00 pm. We had got a late start that day since we pulled into the campground at 12:30 the night before.

AB
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Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

July 18th, 2000, 11:42 pm #7

I can't find the stories but in rec.backcountry

http://www.remarq.com/list/bkcntry?

There is a discussion about a spate of lightining accidents in Colorado last week -- including a fatality on the Diamond Face of Longs Peak.

The posters note that Colorado is second only to Florida in lighning deaths (4/year)

In addition there is a wonderful post on lightning precautions:

http://www.deja.com/threadmsg_ct.xp?AN=646728008.1

The Post and the Rocky Mountain News both had a few stories about the climber, Andy Haberkorn, who was killed on Longs Peak.

The following are links to two:

www.rockymountainnews.com/news/0714stri7.shtml

www.denverpost.com/news/news0714l.htm
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pj
pj

July 19th, 2000, 5:21 pm #8

It was about 2:00 pm. We had got a late start that day since we pulled into the campground at 12:30 the night before.

AB
Even an early start doesn't always avoid the problem. I had to race off South Elbert at 9:30 am during an August t-storm several years ago. We got such an early start the next day, we were on the summit before 8 am.
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