4.9 Magnitude (MbLg) Earthquake

4.9 Magnitude (MbLg) Earthquake

Daniel Smith
Daniel Smith

April 29th, 2003, 1:24 pm #1

A quake centered at approximately 34° 30' N, 85° 36' W with a depth of 5km hit slightly northeast of Fort Payne, AL just before 5 AM (EDT). Earthquakes such as this one are becoming more and more of an anachronism in this area, however, forces such as these are what caused the Appalachian uplift around 480 million years ago. Who knows, Alabama's highpoint, Cheaha Mountain (33° 29' N, 85° 48' W), may have undergone some mountain-building as did Idaho's highpoint in the 1983 Borah Earthquake!

Cheers!

Dan
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Tim Webb
Tim Webb

April 29th, 2003, 4:00 pm #3

A quake centered at approximately 34° 30' N, 85° 36' W with a depth of 5km hit slightly northeast of Fort Payne, AL just before 5 AM (EDT). Earthquakes such as this one are becoming more and more of an anachronism in this area, however, forces such as these are what caused the Appalachian uplift around 480 million years ago. Who knows, Alabama's highpoint, Cheaha Mountain (33° 29' N, 85° 48' W), may have undergone some mountain-building as did Idaho's highpoint in the 1983 Borah Earthquake!

Cheers!

Dan
The quake was enough to rattle my house in northwest Alabama. Woke us up at around 4:00 AM this morning.
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Jim Sutton
Jim Sutton

April 29th, 2003, 7:33 pm #4

And just how would you distinguish the rattling and noise from your snoring? I'm just asking, here. Y'all take care, and fasten that seat belt on your bed at night! JES
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Tim Webb
Tim Webb

April 29th, 2003, 9:54 pm #5

It could have been a moonshine still exploding. There are a few of them in operation around these parts, but not as many as in Craig Noland's back door in Cocke County Tennessee -- the moonshine capitol of the world.
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roger
roger

April 30th, 2003, 12:20 am #6

From the Alabama Geological Society
Only one other earthquake of this strength has been recorded by seismographs in Alabama. That was the 1997 4.9 magnitude earthquake in Escambia County. In recent years there have been numerous small earthquakes in the immediate vicinity of this new quake.


http://www.gsa.state.al.us/gsa/EQ2/eq03 ... 030429.htm



From USGS:
Irondale, Jefferson County, Alabama 1916 10 18 22:04 UTC, 5.10Mfa, Intensity VII
[This is near Birmingham]
http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/eqlists/USA/1 ... 8_iso.html


More
http://www.gsa.state.al.us/
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

April 30th, 2003, 1:03 am #7

It could have been a moonshine still exploding. There are a few of them in operation around these parts, but not as many as in Craig Noland's back door in Cocke County Tennessee -- the moonshine capitol of the world.
Sure it was snores? Eat lots of beans
?
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roger
roger

April 30th, 2003, 2:41 pm #8

A quake centered at approximately 34° 30' N, 85° 36' W with a depth of 5km hit slightly northeast of Fort Payne, AL just before 5 AM (EDT). Earthquakes such as this one are becoming more and more of an anachronism in this area, however, forces such as these are what caused the Appalachian uplift around 480 million years ago. Who knows, Alabama's highpoint, Cheaha Mountain (33° 29' N, 85° 48' W), may have undergone some mountain-building as did Idaho's highpoint in the 1983 Borah Earthquake!

Cheers!

Dan
The magnitude 3.7 event occurred 1 km (1 miles) N of 19 Blytheville, AR.


http://folkworm.ceri.memphis.edu/recent ... 0430a.html
Arkansas Earthquake History
http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/states/arkansas/arkansas.html

34.94N 89.92W
Topozone Map:
http://topozone.com/map.asp?lat=35.94&lon=-89.92

Mapquest Map:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?la ... ude=-89.92
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roger
roger

April 30th, 2003, 2:47 pm #9

A quake centered at approximately 34° 30' N, 85° 36' W with a depth of 5km hit slightly northeast of Fort Payne, AL just before 5 AM (EDT). Earthquakes such as this one are becoming more and more of an anachronism in this area, however, forces such as these are what caused the Appalachian uplift around 480 million years ago. Who knows, Alabama's highpoint, Cheaha Mountain (33° 29' N, 85° 48' W), may have undergone some mountain-building as did Idaho's highpoint in the 1983 Borah Earthquake!

Cheers!

Dan
We have had a lot of stuff on the Forum about the New Madrid fault which had the most powerful 8+ quakes in the lower 48.

The Alabama articles note that state was rocked heavier during New Madrid 1811-12 quakes.
Map of Effects of 1811-12 New Madrid Quakes
http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/eqlists/USA/1811-1812.html

Map of Prospects for a new New Madrid Quake

http://hsv.com/genlintr/newmadrd/

We've had a lot of stuff on the Forum about the New Madrid quakes:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/sea ... erm=Madrid
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