120 mph Winds and -40 Temps Thwart Russian Winter McKinley Climb

120 mph Winds and -40 Temps Thwart Russian Winter McKinley Climb

roger
roger

January 22nd, 2003, 2:54 pm #1

ANCHORAGE - Two Russian mountain climbers are back in Anchorage after their second attempt at Mount McKinley's summit in the dead of winter.
Marat Galinov and Alexandr Smirnov headed up the Muldrow Glacier on Christmas Eve for an attempt on the north side of the mountain.
After two weeks of approaching the mountain, the climbers were hit by a storm at 9,500 feet. The storm, with winds estimated at 120 mph, ripped the climbers' tent apart and blew away two sleds full of gear, food and fuel. The storm also blew away the pair's climbing rope.
After crawling over snow bridges to retrieve gear, the climbers called Hudson Air on a satellite phone and were flown to Talkeetna.
During their 24-day trip, they told KIMO-TV, temperatures dipped as low as 40 below.

More:
<a href=
"http://www.juneauempire.com/stories/011 ... ml">Juneau Empire</a>
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

January 22nd, 2003, 3:26 pm #2

Last night the low was -34&deg;F and the winds were constantly above 100 mph on Mt. Washington.
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Olivier Kozlowski
Olivier Kozlowski

January 22nd, 2003, 7:04 pm #3

Perfect example of why (for those of us in the Northeast, at least), a Presidential Range traverse in the winter is great practice for Denali (admittedly without the altitude).
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roger
roger

January 22nd, 2003, 10:43 pm #4

ANCHORAGE - Two Russian mountain climbers are back in Anchorage after their second attempt at Mount McKinley's summit in the dead of winter.
Marat Galinov and Alexandr Smirnov headed up the Muldrow Glacier on Christmas Eve for an attempt on the north side of the mountain.
After two weeks of approaching the mountain, the climbers were hit by a storm at 9,500 feet. The storm, with winds estimated at 120 mph, ripped the climbers' tent apart and blew away two sleds full of gear, food and fuel. The storm also blew away the pair's climbing rope.
After crawling over snow bridges to retrieve gear, the climbers called Hudson Air on a satellite phone and were flown to Talkeetna.
During their 24-day trip, they told KIMO-TV, temperatures dipped as low as 40 below.

More:
<a href=
"http://www.juneauempire.com/stories/011 ... ml">Juneau Empire</a>
I thought the Minus 40 sounded toasty for McKinley in the Winter and that it might be Celsius.

Looking for a conversion table I found that -40 F = -40 C and that's the only temp that is like that.

New Hampshire Ball Bearings Conversion Chart

PU Software Online Converter
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roger
roger

January 22nd, 2003, 10:55 pm #5

For what it's worth the windchill of 120 mph winds with -40 temps is -85 F

Glocker Weather Calculators
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

January 23rd, 2003, 1:39 am #6

The Wind Chill Formula was revised about a year ago. The new formula is

35.74+0.6215*WS-35.75*(T^0.16)+0.4275*WS*T^0.16

where WS is the wind speed in miles per hour and T is the ambient temperature in degrees Fahrenheit.

Using a wind speed of 120 mph and an ambient temperature of -40 F results in an effective wind chill of -103 F.
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patrick
patrick

January 24th, 2003, 2:15 am #7

either way, thats REALLY COLD! Might need more than 2 t-shirts.
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roger
roger

January 24th, 2003, 4:52 pm #8

Last night the low was -34&deg;F and the winds were constantly above 100 mph on Mt. Washington.
And New Hampshire's Mount Washington saw the Northeast's coldest temperatures on Wednesday as the mercury dropped to 35 below with winds topping 140 mph.
Source: <a href=” http://www.nj.com/news/times/index.ssf? ... l&#x94;>Trenton Times</a>
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Jack
Jack

January 30th, 2003, 3:29 pm #9

Perfect example of why (for those of us in the Northeast, at least), a Presidential Range traverse in the winter is great practice for Denali (admittedly without the altitude).
Or for those living in Alaska, Mt McKinley is a good training ground for a transverse of the Presidential range during winter. )
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wally
wally

January 31st, 2003, 11:42 pm #10

For what it's worth the windchill of 120 mph winds with -40 temps is -85 F

Glocker Weather Calculators
The 'Old Wind Chill Index' used prior to Nov.1,2001 would yield a value of -85 deg F.

Today's 'New Wind Chill Index' used by the U.S.A and Canada since 11/01/2001 would read -103 deg F with your parameters.

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml

I still like to look at/compare both tables.
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