Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk On a Submarine

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Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk On a Submarine

Joined: July 21st, 2003, 4:56 pm

April 4th, 2004, 5:35 pm #1

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan





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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 7:39 pm

April 4th, 2004, 5:37 pm #2

This calls for a:


WTF?


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Joined: June 20th, 2003, 6:40 pm

April 4th, 2004, 5:46 pm #3

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




This calls for a:


WTF?
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Same here......so whats exactly whats the point of this,

as it really says of none......sounds like someone jumped on the idea after a few to many beers.....

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Bello vel Pace Paratus
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Joined: March 27th, 2003, 1:51 pm

April 4th, 2004, 5:48 pm #4

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




Nice signature, Broken. An eagle acutally flew over my house yesterday, but obviously not that species. I think it was a golden eagle...
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 7:39 pm

April 4th, 2004, 5:50 pm #5

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




Weren't there Japanese subs during WWII that had a seaplane they would remove and assemble while on the surface? They would have a watertight hanger, and the planes wings would be folded at the roots. That way they would have long range reconaissance.

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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 7:39 pm

April 4th, 2004, 6:07 pm #6

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




If I'm not mistaken it was a: Aichi M6A-1 "Seiran"

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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 7:39 pm

April 4th, 2004, 6:10 pm #7

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




"Aichi chief engineer, Toshio Ozaki, designed the M6A1 Seiran to fulfill the requirement for a bomber that could operate exclusively from a submarine. Japanese war planners devised the idea as a means for striking directly at the United States mainland and other important strategic targets that lay thousands of kilometers from Japan. To support Seiran operations, the Japanese developed a fleet of submarine aircraft carriers to bring the aircraft within striking distance. No Seiran ever saw combat but the Seiran/submarine weapons system represents an ingenious blend of aviation and marine technology.

Japan was already operating reconnaissance aircraft from submarines before the United States entered World War II. One of these airplanes actually bombed American soil. On September 9, 1942, a Yokosuka E14Y1 GLEN (Allied codename) reconnaissance floatplane launched by catapult from the submarine I-25 and dropped four improvised phosphorus bombs into a forest on the Oregon coast. Five months earlier, the Japanese Navy issued orders to build a new series of submarine aircraft carriers called the I-400 class. Navy planners envisioned a large fleet but eventually only three were completed: I-400 thru I-402. The five ships in this class were the largest submarines ever built until the USS Lafayette sailed in 1962. An I-400 boat displaced 5,970 metric tons (6,560 tons) submerged and it cruised at 18.7 knots surfaced. These ships could travel 60,000 km (43,000 mi) carrying three Seirans in waterproof compartments. A class of smaller Japanese submarines called the AM class was also modified to carry two Seirans."







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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 7:39 pm

April 4th, 2004, 6:13 pm #8

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan














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Joined: June 20th, 2003, 6:40 pm

April 4th, 2004, 6:54 pm #9

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




Nice signature, Broken. An eagle acutally flew over my house yesterday, but obviously not that species. I think it was a golden eagle...
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Yes, to be honest I would not be able to tell you what a Golden Eagle looks like, Bald Eagles for that matter are becoming more common, saw a few this summer up on the peninsula in upper Michigan, if your by a lake / river or what not you'll see one pass at times if your lucky.....

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Bello vel Pace Paratus
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Joined: January 28th, 2003, 5:12 pm

April 4th, 2004, 7:11 pm #10

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




About the sig, A bald eagle stole the pike I had on my fishing line about 12 yards away from me, most awesome site ever.


"deeds, not words"
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Joined: March 13th, 2004, 9:51 am

April 4th, 2004, 10:37 pm #11

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




Aaah, just in case you didn't realise, that picture is photoshopped. It has been seen before. Still looks cool though.
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Joined: March 27th, 2003, 1:51 pm

April 5th, 2004, 8:24 am #12

The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat limited deck space of the submarine. A problem with the Skyhawk's turbine cavitating while underway submerged was overcome. The diesel catapult worked just fine. However, the experiment was abandoned when the submarine's XO objected to the jet blast burning the paintwork off the sail.
Photograph courtesy of the Australian Naval Aircraft Museum: Mark Clayton, Director;, Windy Geale, Curator

http://www.skyhawk.org/











R.K. Laxman, India's renowned cartoonist, honours the hardy & humble Indian Jawan




>> Yes, to be honest I would not be able to tell you what a Golden Eagle looks like... <<

Me neither, but I looked it up afterwards and of the two species we have in Norway it had to be the golden eagle. It was huge...
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