Steve Perry

Steve Perry

Tim
Tim

April 18th, 2012, 6:59 am #1

singing Journey Boston songs in Iowa in 1979....

Sorry.... I'm sitting hear fixing a PC, and the virus was making all file attributes H (Hidden)....

The person is a handy capped man who comes to me for help.

And we are all handy capped in one way or another.

Love one another with a whole heart.

Bro Tim

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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

April 18th, 2012, 12:40 pm #2

Helping each other is probably the most important aspect of any economy. It's only when you can help someone that you feel your own worth.

There is nothing hidden that shall not be revealed .... LOL.

Here's a trick I use myself if I'm looking for hidden files ...

I inspect the suspect drive/OS with a different OS. I always keep two or more alternate operating systems on my computers so I can do repairs to the dead system. A hidden file keeps itself hidden by instructing the operating system to bypass finding its own enumeration. But ... if it's inside of a dead system, it has no such power.

-Vince
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Arthur dent
Arthur dent

April 18th, 2012, 10:47 pm #3

LOL @ "enumeration."

Very good.
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Tim
Tim

April 19th, 2012, 4:31 am #4

Helping each other is probably the most important aspect of any economy. It's only when you can help someone that you feel your own worth.

There is nothing hidden that shall not be revealed .... LOL.

Here's a trick I use myself if I'm looking for hidden files ...

I inspect the suspect drive/OS with a different OS. I always keep two or more alternate operating systems on my computers so I can do repairs to the dead system. A hidden file keeps itself hidden by instructing the operating system to bypass finding its own enumeration. But ... if it's inside of a dead system, it has no such power.

-Vince
Its was still able to run windows, so I didn't need a boot CD.

Hay check this out Vince. This is what I use.
http://www.9down.com/hirens-bootcd-15-0-399981/
It even has utilities to let you edit NTFS in DOS mode.

I used to make my own boot utility CD's with Norton Commander and other stuff on it, but Hiren's Boot CD is the ultimate utility boot CD.

Tim
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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

April 19th, 2012, 5:39 am #5

... but my preference was and still is ... BartPE. I think Hiren's is built on BartPE ... right?

That's if you need a boot disc...

A real operating system has a lot more flexibility and functionality so I always have a "spare" sitting on another drive in my machines ... which I can quickly boot into. Of course you CAN'T quickly create another OS if you're working on a customer's machine and so Hiren's or BartPE are extremely useful.

But ...

A very little known procedure makes it possible to simply COPY an existing operating system and then "paste" it onto another drive and ... boot it up and use it as a completely "new" independent operating system. This saves an enormous amount of time because one doesn't have to INSTALL the OS and all programs etc. If you're interested, I'll give you the details on how to do it.

BTW ... that Hiren's site no longer allows downloading of anything but files you uploaded yourself, first.

Thanks anyway.

-Vince
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Tim
Tim

April 19th, 2012, 6:42 am #6

COPY an existing operating system and then "paste" it onto another drive and ... boot it up and use it as a completely "new" independent operating system.
--------------------------------------------------

Ya, but does it remove viruses?

I use Norton Ghost on my system.
And I have 3 separate OS's on my #1 HDD.
And a boot menu pops up for 3 seconds when booting, US BOOT.
And it configures the partitions to whatever you program it to do, hidden or system and so on.

My systems cooler then your LOL

3 gigs ram.
Win XP Pro. (Main C:)
Win 7. (Just for??)
Win XP Pro Hot. (For backups and utilities)

3 HDD's.
100 gb.
100gb.
2 tb SATA.

But my CPU is only a P4 @ 2.8 ghz.

Main board has PCI-E slot and 2 SATA and other PCI slots.
And I have a DVR tuner card that captures in DVD quality.
PCI-E Nvidia with 500 mb on board.

And a super cool Gateway case with quick releases for the HDD's, and CDR DVDR, although I did have to modify the case for the motherboard and power supply.
But a Dremel works good for that with a metal cutting blade.

But anyway, if I get a BAD virus I can replace the system in 15 minutes, because I keep my main OS on C: partition #1, and the other programs on other HDD's. So I only Ghost about 10 gb. And I keep my main OS on FAT32 so I don't have to deal with NTFS if problems arise.

My first PC was 10 mhz in Turbo Mode, 20 mg HDD, 640k RAM. And I washed the motherboard in the kitchen sink and it worked fine afterward.

Then I bought a 40 mhz for $1,500 at Sams Club.
I bought a CD player for it for $149 at Egg Soft. And that baby would hold about 400 mg of RAM!!!! Then I upgraded it to a 80 mhz CPU and a new motherboard.

Then I got into doing PC repair.

Tim
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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

April 19th, 2012, 11:45 am #7

Don't like to get into the comparison game ... to be honest with you. My computer has quite high specs but that's because it's almost brand new. I've got 16 gb of RAM and 3.2 ghz X 4 cores ... but all of that doesn't mean much unless it all works the way it's SUPPOSED to ... LOL. Right now I have my memory usage cut back to 7 gb because if I go higher, it causes problems with running a virtual machine (XP) inside of W7.

I used Ghost ... once upon a time but have been using Acronis 8 for a lot of years now. It definitely knocks the socks off of Ghost and it's about the best Acronis version ever put out, in my opinion. (Doesn't work in W7 though). No rebooting needed to finish an image job ... like Ghost always required. I can knock off a 20gb operating system/programs into an image in about 7 minutes and restore it in the same amount of time.

You were "asking" if an alternate system can "fix a virus". Well that's a pretty ambiguous question, isn't it?

The point is ... if you work on a dead system, the "virus" can't fight you.

And ...

If the "virus" is a rootkit (which actually CONTROLS the operating system at the lowest level) ... you won't be able to find it in the infected system while running that system ... because it forces the system NOT to reveal itself.

If you boot into an alternate, uninfected OS and look at the dead drive, it will reveal the rootkit files. You can even use remote registry to examine registry contents on the infected drive and remove the rootkit's ability to operate.

Keeping the OS on FAT32 is okay in a way. I did that for quite awhile but as the OS kept growing with updates and service packs and newer more bloated programs ... I finally capitulated and changed to NTFS. You can't 'swing' more than 4 gb at a time on FAT32 and it's really easy to accidentally copy more than 4 gb when moving stuff around ... and then you corrupt the files you copied and pasted. That's the main reason why I finally switched over to NTFS on all my OS partitions.

My new machine has a really neat arrangement for inserting hard drives. They go in sideways at the front end from the motherboard side. No screws; all slide 'n click, with rail adapters that fit to the hard drives. I love it. No more fighting with those immense IDE ribbon cables getting into the way of everything. All is SATA inside.

-Vince

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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

April 19th, 2012, 2:34 pm #8

Its was still able to run windows, so I didn't need a boot CD.

Hay check this out Vince. This is what I use.
http://www.9down.com/hirens-bootcd-15-0-399981/
It even has utilities to let you edit NTFS in DOS mode.

I used to make my own boot utility CD's with Norton Commander and other stuff on it, but Hiren's Boot CD is the ultimate utility boot CD.

Tim
I probably underestimated Hiren's.

Your link no longer works for downloading it but I happened to have a CD with Hiren's installed on it. I guess you must have mentioned it before and I downloaded it and made myself a CD.

Well, I was rather surprised in that ... I put it into my new machine and it booted up (or loaded up, shall I say) ... without a hitch. None of my Bart versions will load on this machine; they all BSOD on me. The Hiren's version I have must be pretty recent.

It also displayed all of my drives ... which REALLY surprised me because my bios is set to AHCI control and it runs the very latest version - iaAHCI. XP has no drivers for AHCI. So that was quite amazing in itself.

And then the BIGGEST surprise was the size of the RAMdisk: ONE GIGABYTE!!

WOW. That allows for a lot of flexibility to install programs if one needs to.

BartPE had a maximum size of 64 mb RAMdisk. See what I mean? I could install AVG into BartPE but then when I did the updates, I had to clear all temp files out first before it could manage to squeeze everything in.

A couple of issues though ...

My network card was left uninstalled. I guess Hiren's -(the version I have)- doesn't contain a driver for my network card. I reckon I could probably install it myself though?

I think the graphics card was left uninstalled too because the screen was pretty fuzzy to look at. There was one "unknown device" in Device Manager which was likely the graphics card.

Have you tried putting Hiren's onto a thumb drive?

-Vince
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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

April 20th, 2012, 3:18 am #9

Yes, this definitely seems to be superior to BartPE all around!

I fired it up on my old 1 ghz Gigabyte board computer and everything works without a hitch. No problems with missing drivers; network works flawlessly.

I'm presently downloading version 15.1 and will try that out on my new machine. Maybe it'll have all the updated drivers aboard for my new machine.

(http://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/ ... zip file)

With BartPE ... you had to compile it all yourself, using your own XP disc. Hiren's is all pre-compiled. Not sure how they get away with using an un-owned OS to do it ... maybe because XP is now old enough that no one would use Hiren's UNLESS they already own XP, Vista or W7.

I found instructions for putting it onto a memory stick too. I'll probably wipe one of my thumbdrives and put Hiren's on it. I can always add other stuff to the drive later.

-Vince
Last edited by MoxiFox on April 20th, 2012, 3:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Tim
Tim

April 20th, 2012, 5:35 am #10

Don't like to get into the comparison game ... to be honest with you. My computer has quite high specs but that's because it's almost brand new. I've got 16 gb of RAM and 3.2 ghz X 4 cores ... but all of that doesn't mean much unless it all works the way it's SUPPOSED to ... LOL. Right now I have my memory usage cut back to 7 gb because if I go higher, it causes problems with running a virtual machine (XP) inside of W7.

I used Ghost ... once upon a time but have been using Acronis 8 for a lot of years now. It definitely knocks the socks off of Ghost and it's about the best Acronis version ever put out, in my opinion. (Doesn't work in W7 though). No rebooting needed to finish an image job ... like Ghost always required. I can knock off a 20gb operating system/programs into an image in about 7 minutes and restore it in the same amount of time.

You were "asking" if an alternate system can "fix a virus". Well that's a pretty ambiguous question, isn't it?

The point is ... if you work on a dead system, the "virus" can't fight you.

And ...

If the "virus" is a rootkit (which actually CONTROLS the operating system at the lowest level) ... you won't be able to find it in the infected system while running that system ... because it forces the system NOT to reveal itself.

If you boot into an alternate, uninfected OS and look at the dead drive, it will reveal the rootkit files. You can even use remote registry to examine registry contents on the infected drive and remove the rootkit's ability to operate.

Keeping the OS on FAT32 is okay in a way. I did that for quite awhile but as the OS kept growing with updates and service packs and newer more bloated programs ... I finally capitulated and changed to NTFS. You can't 'swing' more than 4 gb at a time on FAT32 and it's really easy to accidentally copy more than 4 gb when moving stuff around ... and then you corrupt the files you copied and pasted. That's the main reason why I finally switched over to NTFS on all my OS partitions.

My new machine has a really neat arrangement for inserting hard drives. They go in sideways at the front end from the motherboard side. No screws; all slide 'n click, with rail adapters that fit to the hard drives. I love it. No more fighting with those immense IDE ribbon cables getting into the way of everything. All is SATA inside.

-Vince
All is SATA inside.
-------------------------

OH YOU BRAT!! Just kidding LOL

Cool system Vince.
And plugin HDD's with no ribbon cable, that's awesome!

My drive E: is SATA 2tb NTFS so I have a place to store large files.
I believe the FAT32 can only handle up to 2gb file size.

My motherboard can handle up to 4gb of RAM, but 16gb?!?!.. I didn't know Windows could even utilize that. But then my motherboard cost $49, a birthday present to myself two years ago. But I like it. And the TV tuner DVR card is really cool.

Ya, the virus on Ronny's computer; I've dealt with that one before, so I didn't need to boot from a utility CD, the virus only marks files as hidden, and with Windows Commander you can un-hide and change all the file attributes easy and in all sub-directories. And to kill the EXE its always in "Documents and Settings" with some non-scents name, and its always about 346k bits.

Tim
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