Proving atheists wrong with science

Proving atheists wrong with science

Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

June 8th, 2011, 5:16 pm #1

Brilliant. Simply brilliant.


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Joined: September 30th, 2009, 7:55 pm

June 8th, 2011, 5:48 pm #2

You mean when we drink water, the water molecules in the water are destroyed?

Nope. Whenever living things sweat, take a leak, etc... the water molecules that they previously ingested are released back into the environment, where the water in the urine/sweat is evaporated, and comes back as rain. And the cycle begins again.

Funny how creationists are trying to use science to support their god hypothesis... but it would do them a world of good to actually learn about science first.

But then again, if they did that, they wouldn't be creationists.

"Creationism has not made a single contribution to agriculture, medicine, conservation, forestry, pathology, or any other applied area of biology. Creationism has yielded no classifications, no biogeographies, no underlying mechanisms, no unifying concepts with which to study organisms or life." -- Botanical Society of America's Statement on Creationism


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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

June 8th, 2011, 7:24 pm #3

Guess I'm wrong.

:-/
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Joined: September 30th, 2009, 7:55 pm

June 8th, 2011, 8:35 pm #4

I wonder how the creationists will fit Noah's Flood into that "science" of theirs? They seem to have left out that point.

Reminds me of Ken Ham, the director of the "Creationist Museum" in Kentucky. He claims that carbon-14 dating can't be trusted because it's only accurate to 50,000 years.

This coming from the guy who thinks the world is only 6,000 years old.

Creationists constantly contradict themselves.

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"When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion." -- Robert M. Pirsig
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Joined: January 13th, 2010, 2:50 pm

June 8th, 2011, 10:51 pm #5

Brilliant. Simply brilliant.


I have mixed hopes about the "religious & ignorant".

On one hand, if they'd actually solve their own problems of ignorance, we might actually make progress on solving problems a lot quicker.


On the other hand, they're so entertaining that I'd miss them when they're gone.


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Tim
Tim

June 9th, 2011, 2:40 am #6

Brilliant. Simply brilliant.


Atheists claim humans have been around for about 200,000 years.
If that is true, why was there only about 1 billion humans on earth just 200 years ago, and today there are over 6 billion?

So the population grows 6 times every 200 years.

If humans had been here for 200,000 years the earth would have had billion of humans living on it thousands of years ago.

As you can imagine, the compounding numbers don't even come close to working.

In just 3,000 years, 2 people would become over 940 billion people.

Or maybe the answer is it took humans 199,800 years to concur the earth and thrive as the master species? Not.

Why the population explosion these days?.. Is it prophetic?

Revelation9:14
And the four angels were loosed, which were prepared for an hour, and a day, and a month, and a year, for to slay the third part of men. {for an hour: or, at an hour}
16 And the number of the army of the horsemen were two hundred thousand thousand: and I heard the number of them.

An army of 200 million. The USA only has about 300 million people in it.

Any ideas?

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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

June 9th, 2011, 2:46 am #7

We were hunters and gatherers. We started to plant crops and domesticate animals. After which our population started growing much faster. Increased food supply seems to equate to increased population.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agricultural_revolution

See also, the Neolithic Revolution.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2054675

The Neolithic Revolution



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This is the story of a revolution. It's not as well known as the French Revolution, or the Industrial Revolution, or the Information Revolution. Neither did it take place quite so quickly. No records were kept, so there is still much we do not know about it. Even so, it stands alone as the greatest revolution in the history of mankind. Were it not for the Neolithic1 Revolution, society as we know it today would be vastly different, and none of these other revolutions mentioned would have ever taken place.

Hunter-gatherer Life

For most of our time on Earth2, we humans lived as hunter-gatherers. Every day, groups of people would trap and kill wild animals, while others collected and prepared wild plants, nuts, fungi, and berries. If they were lucky and food was abundant, they were able to provide enough food for themselves and their children. If they were unlucky, they starved and died. In order to stay close to their food sources, hunter-gatherers needed to be mobile. They set up temporary camps, lived there for a while, and moved on when the food supply began to dwindle. For mobility, tribal units were small just a few families, all of whom worked hard to keep themselves and their children alive. Because of the vagaries of weather, animal migrations, and the long seasons3, starvation was always just one step away. People had precious little time to do anything other than find food, warmth, and shelter for themselves and their families4.

The Dawn of the Neolithic Age

Fourteen thousand years ago, at the end of the last Ice Age, a new lifestyle, known to archeologists as the Natufian culture, began to emerge in the Middle East. The Ice Age was coming to an end and temperatures were warming very quickly. Food became available in relative abundance for the first time in thousands of years. Instead of having to travel long distances to find food, some groups were able to live in the same place all year round. People started to build permanent dwellings. By 10,000 BC, the end of the Younger Dryas period, they were discovering that certain animals, such as goats, sheep, cattle and pigs, had temperaments and dispositions that made them easy to manage within close proximity to their dwellings. They selected and cultivated certain grasses, such as oats, wheat and barley, which provided nourishment to larger groups of people. These plants became common anywhere there was human settlement, eclipsing all other plant-food sources. They discovered how to store and preserve food over the harsh winter months. Thus, farming began and a new age, the Neolithic Age, was ushered in.

The Effects of the Neolithic Revolution

The move from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a sedentary farming lifestyle did not take place overnight. Neither was it unique to the Middle East: Latin America and China experienced totally independent Neolithic Revolutions at later periods in time. In fact, it can be argued that in the beginning, it was in many ways an inferior lifestyle to hunter-gathering, since settled people were easier targets for attack, their nutrition undoubtedly suffered due to lack of a balanced diet, and they were more likely to suffer diseases. However, by 7000 BC, it was the dominant occupation in the Middle East, and it was already taking hold in Southern Europe and Northern Africa. For those people affected, the change that had taken place was enormous. The changes were so profound they live on with us today.

Population Growth

The changes brought about by farming can be distilled into two key concepts - a sedentary lifestyle, and a food surplus.

In hunter-gatherer societies, women need a gap of at least three to four years between children, as multiple, highly dependent babies are incompatible with a mobile lifestyle. No such limitation existed when people lived in permanent settlements, and so it became possible for women to have children much more frequently. Additionally, as the techniques of plant cultivation and animal husbandry became more refined, it was possible to feed entire groups of people from relatively small numbers of food-sources, and still have food left over for storage during the winter months. People in agricultural communities were less subject to the whims of nature than hunter gatherers and thus had a higher chance of survival. Thus, a population explosion occurred, and over time villages, then towns, and eventually cities, took shape.

...
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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

June 9th, 2011, 2:53 am #8

I wonder how the creationists will fit Noah's Flood into that "science" of theirs? They seem to have left out that point.

Reminds me of Ken Ham, the director of the "Creationist Museum" in Kentucky. He claims that carbon-14 dating can't be trusted because it's only accurate to 50,000 years.

This coming from the guy who thinks the world is only 6,000 years old.

Creationists constantly contradict themselves.

-----------------------------------------------
"When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion." -- Robert M. Pirsig
Because there just isn't enough water to cover the Earth. It just doesn't exist. Yet, there are seemingly intelligent people that believe in a global flood.

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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

June 9th, 2011, 2:59 am #9

I have mixed hopes about the "religious & ignorant".

On one hand, if they'd actually solve their own problems of ignorance, we might actually make progress on solving problems a lot quicker.


On the other hand, they're so entertaining that I'd miss them when they're gone.


I was hoping one of our Fundy friends would pop up and Defend the Faith here.

Or quite possibly, the message above will be re-posted for edification on a more evangelical type forum.

rolls eyes
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Tim
Tim

June 9th, 2011, 3:30 am #10

We were hunters and gatherers. We started to plant crops and domesticate animals. After which our population started growing much faster. Increased food supply seems to equate to increased population.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agricultural_revolution

See also, the Neolithic Revolution.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2054675

The Neolithic Revolution



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This is the story of a revolution. It's not as well known as the French Revolution, or the Industrial Revolution, or the Information Revolution. Neither did it take place quite so quickly. No records were kept, so there is still much we do not know about it. Even so, it stands alone as the greatest revolution in the history of mankind. Were it not for the Neolithic1 Revolution, society as we know it today would be vastly different, and none of these other revolutions mentioned would have ever taken place.

Hunter-gatherer Life

For most of our time on Earth2, we humans lived as hunter-gatherers. Every day, groups of people would trap and kill wild animals, while others collected and prepared wild plants, nuts, fungi, and berries. If they were lucky and food was abundant, they were able to provide enough food for themselves and their children. If they were unlucky, they starved and died. In order to stay close to their food sources, hunter-gatherers needed to be mobile. They set up temporary camps, lived there for a while, and moved on when the food supply began to dwindle. For mobility, tribal units were small just a few families, all of whom worked hard to keep themselves and their children alive. Because of the vagaries of weather, animal migrations, and the long seasons3, starvation was always just one step away. People had precious little time to do anything other than find food, warmth, and shelter for themselves and their families4.

The Dawn of the Neolithic Age

Fourteen thousand years ago, at the end of the last Ice Age, a new lifestyle, known to archeologists as the Natufian culture, began to emerge in the Middle East. The Ice Age was coming to an end and temperatures were warming very quickly. Food became available in relative abundance for the first time in thousands of years. Instead of having to travel long distances to find food, some groups were able to live in the same place all year round. People started to build permanent dwellings. By 10,000 BC, the end of the Younger Dryas period, they were discovering that certain animals, such as goats, sheep, cattle and pigs, had temperaments and dispositions that made them easy to manage within close proximity to their dwellings. They selected and cultivated certain grasses, such as oats, wheat and barley, which provided nourishment to larger groups of people. These plants became common anywhere there was human settlement, eclipsing all other plant-food sources. They discovered how to store and preserve food over the harsh winter months. Thus, farming began and a new age, the Neolithic Age, was ushered in.

The Effects of the Neolithic Revolution

The move from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a sedentary farming lifestyle did not take place overnight. Neither was it unique to the Middle East: Latin America and China experienced totally independent Neolithic Revolutions at later periods in time. In fact, it can be argued that in the beginning, it was in many ways an inferior lifestyle to hunter-gathering, since settled people were easier targets for attack, their nutrition undoubtedly suffered due to lack of a balanced diet, and they were more likely to suffer diseases. However, by 7000 BC, it was the dominant occupation in the Middle East, and it was already taking hold in Southern Europe and Northern Africa. For those people affected, the change that had taken place was enormous. The changes were so profound they live on with us today.

Population Growth

The changes brought about by farming can be distilled into two key concepts - a sedentary lifestyle, and a food surplus.

In hunter-gatherer societies, women need a gap of at least three to four years between children, as multiple, highly dependent babies are incompatible with a mobile lifestyle. No such limitation existed when people lived in permanent settlements, and so it became possible for women to have children much more frequently. Additionally, as the techniques of plant cultivation and animal husbandry became more refined, it was possible to feed entire groups of people from relatively small numbers of food-sources, and still have food left over for storage during the winter months. People in agricultural communities were less subject to the whims of nature than hunter gatherers and thus had a higher chance of survival. Thus, a population explosion occurred, and over time villages, then towns, and eventually cities, took shape.

...
how much older people are living today. Compared to just 40 years ago.
For example my dad is about 25% older then he would have been without modern medical technology. And that allown would boost the population 25%.

And with the info you noted Mondo I guess the best Biblical answer would be;
Daniel12:4 But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased.

"knowledge shall be increased"
So as our knowledge recently boomed, so did the population.

I knew we could find the answer, good job Bro Mondo

The answers are always hidden behind asking the right questions. And getting the right perception.

Bro Tim
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