Agent: Coyotes won’t qualify Brule, set to become UFA

Agent: Coyotes won’t qualify Brule, set to become UFA

Joined: November 18th, 2004, 10:50 pm

June 23rd, 2012, 10:37 pm #1

It appears Gilbert Brules long, strange trip through the NHL is about to take another turn.

According to Vancouvers News 1130, the 25-year-old RFA wont be tendered a qualifying offer from the Phoenix Coyotes, making him an unrestricted free agent.

Player agent Gerry Johansson said hell meet with Phoenix GM Don Maloney at this weekends draft in the hope of reaching a new deal. Brules in the final season of a two-year deal that paid $1.85 million annually, so its likely the Coyotes simply werent interested in matching that.

Brules career has been tumultuous since Columbus took him sixth overall at the 2005 NHL Entry Draft. He fell out of favor with the Blue Jackets and Oilers before landing with the Coyotes and, in a February interview with the Vancouver Sun, alluded to some off-ice issues that plagued the early parts of his career:

Asked if he suffered from depression, Brule said:
I dont know what you want to call it. I just wasnt happy with things. On the ice, hockey is obviously the biggest part of my life. In every aspect, it affects you, especially when youre not doing well or not doing as well as you think you should.

Brule said his issues stem from family, but he is keeping those issues private.

In September, before the Oilers waived him through the NHL and sent Brule to their minor-league team in Oklahoma City, he told the Edmonton Journal:
The things Ive had to go through with my family have been very, very tough. I would never wish them on anyone. It has definitely affected me in a very negative way and I wasnt feeling very good about myself.

Brule performed well in just under a half season with the Coyotes, scoring 5G-9A-14PTS in 33 regular season games with a plus-7 rating. He also chipped in with a pair of goals during Phoenixs surprising run to the Western Conference finals.

*** BTW ~ Canucks can makeup for not getting to draft Gilbert, by signing him,and putting him as the Right Wing with the Sedins,where he would score 30 goals,40 assists and about 350 hits.*** TKO Pro Scout

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 19th, 2005, 7:30 pm

June 23rd, 2012, 11:23 pm #2

I mean with the amount of attention a 25 year old player now going on to his 18th NHL team (if anyone is dumb enough to waste a roster spot on him) you would think he was mollekan's pet project or something.

-----------


"Now you wear your skin like iron
Your breath's as hard as kerosene"
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 14th, 2007, 7:51 pm

June 24th, 2012, 1:06 am #3

While Brule is probably never going to live up to his 6th overall draft slot, I do think he has been able to establish that he can play in the NHL. His 2009-10 season in Edmonton and 2011-12 season in Phoenix showed that he can be a .5 point a game player in a third line role. There is room for guys like that.

The $1.8 million contract is overpaying him for that role and I think that's why Edmonton waived him and is also why Phoenix is going to non-tender him. At a more reasonable price - $1 million or so - I think a number of teams would like to have him.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 24th, 2007, 3:21 pm

June 24th, 2012, 4:40 pm #4

When a 30-40pt guy is somehow making more money in the NHL than NBA bench players and NFL back-ups... There's a problem. (As you point out. Or, at least I think you think it's a problem from your comment about cutting Brule's salary basically in half.)

Time to gut the NHL. Slash 6 or 8 teams. Drop a couple hundred Plugs into the minors/Europe/retirement, where they belong.

Games would be watchable again if you actually knew the 3rd and 4th line guys could compete with the "stars" when needed.

No offense intended... But watching King and Nolan get handed a Stanley Cup and get treated like they were the second coming of Messier and Doug Gilmour-- for their exceptional 3rd and 4th line role play-- made my stomach turn. It wasn't a "coming out party" for them as much as it was a very stunning example of just how watered down the league is.

There is probably another 300-400 players around the world that could be plugged into NHL lineups in place of the "bottom" players and nobody would notice a difference in the game one bit.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 14th, 2007, 7:51 pm

June 24th, 2012, 5:18 pm #5

I agree that if you cut 6-8 teams from the league, the calibre of play would go up. But I'm not sure this is an NHL-specific truth. If you cut 6-8 teams from the NFL or the NBA, the calibre of play in those leagues would go up too.

The probable reason the 3rd/4th line guys in the NHL are making such good money is because the NHL has a 23 man roster and a $70 million salary cap. That's a $3 million average salary for teams that spend to the cap, which is a good number of them.

The thing about the NHL that I DONT understand is why the gap between the superstars and the plugs isn't higher. The highest paid player in the NHL is Ovechkin, at a $9.5 million per year average. Malkin and Crosby make $8.7 and Eric Staal makes $8.2. Nobody else in the league tops $8 million. Since the maximum salary under a $70 million cap is $14 million per player (no player can make more than 20% of his team's total salary) and nobody in the NHL is even close to that number, why are more of the stars not making more money? If they were, that would leave less money for the 3rd/4th liners and we wouldn't see the marginal players making 7 digits.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 24th, 2007, 3:21 pm

June 24th, 2012, 5:39 pm #6

I totally agree. The star players should absolutely be getting a bigger piece of the pie. Every team should have two or three guys who make huge money and the rest should be paid according to their roles--not what a UNION has negotiated for them.



As for the watering down issue... I'd submit that it IS an NHL problem. We've just become used to the fact that there are so many teams and the calibre of play is such. I like to think that there is a critical mass of players that make the game as good as it can be (while still keeping a decent number of franchises for revenue purposes,) and that the NHL has exceeded it by that 6 or 8 teams.

The NBA and NFL are more position specific. Stars drive the games. They get paid. In the NFL's case, they could ADD a team or two and not affect the product.

What do we get? Talk about how the Capitals were a better team when Ovechkin's minutes were being cut back?!?!?!? Insane!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 10th, 2010, 10:30 pm

June 25th, 2012, 12:40 am #7

I agree that if you cut 6-8 teams from the league, the calibre of play would go up. But I'm not sure this is an NHL-specific truth. If you cut 6-8 teams from the NFL or the NBA, the calibre of play in those leagues would go up too.

The probable reason the 3rd/4th line guys in the NHL are making such good money is because the NHL has a 23 man roster and a $70 million salary cap. That's a $3 million average salary for teams that spend to the cap, which is a good number of them.

The thing about the NHL that I DONT understand is why the gap between the superstars and the plugs isn't higher. The highest paid player in the NHL is Ovechkin, at a $9.5 million per year average. Malkin and Crosby make $8.7 and Eric Staal makes $8.2. Nobody else in the league tops $8 million. Since the maximum salary under a $70 million cap is $14 million per player (no player can make more than 20% of his team's total salary) and nobody in the NHL is even close to that number, why are more of the stars not making more money? If they were, that would leave less money for the 3rd/4th liners and we wouldn't see the marginal players making 7 digits.
lecavalier, richards, ehrhoff, kovalchuk, bryzgalov all make around 11 or more a season
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 14th, 2007, 7:51 pm

June 25th, 2012, 2:28 am #8

In actual salary they may make that much some years, yes. In cap hit (which is the average salary over the life of the contract) they do not:

http://www.capgeek.com/leaders.php?type=CAP_HIT

I did specify that I was talking about Ovechkin et al's average salary.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 10th, 2010, 10:30 pm

June 25th, 2012, 3:44 am #9

nm
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 21st, 2004, 5:08 am

June 25th, 2012, 2:45 pm #10

In actual salary they may make that much some years, yes. In cap hit (which is the average salary over the life of the contract) they do not:

http://www.capgeek.com/leaders.php?type=CAP_HIT

I did specify that I was talking about Ovechkin et al's average salary.
But it includes the last four years of the twelve year deal at about 1.5 million and than the last three at 1.0 million. If one didn't include those years it would be 60 million over 8 years appoximately for a hit of around 7.5 million a year.
Quote
Like
Share