Book of the "The First International Symposium of ANi - Kars"

Book of the "The First International Symposium of ANi - Kars"

Joined: July 18th, 2016, 12:56 pm

December 27th, 2016, 1:56 am #1

Noting publication of an illustrated multilingual book titled: "I. Uluslararasi Ani - Kars Sempozumi: The First International Symposium of ANi - Kars". The editors are Oktay Belli, Ayhan Yardimciel, Vedat Evren Belli and Cengiz Celik.

I can't locate a webpage on the book. The "ANi City" Facebook feed https://www.facebook.com/AN%C4%B0-City- ... f=NEWSFEED) has photos of the book cover and some of its pages the information below in Turkish, and I've added teh Google Translate version below.

Turkish language: "ni şehrinin Türkler tarafından fethinin 950. yıldönümü anısına, 14-15 Ağustos 2014 tarihleri arasında Kafkas Üniversitesi bünyesinde düzenlenilen I. Uluslararası Ani ..Kars Sempozyumu'nun bildiriler kitabı yayımlandı.
Kitap için ..DOSTUM SAYIN HOCAM Ayhan Yardimciel'e Teşekkür Ederim."

Google Translate: "The book of the 1st International Ani .. Kars Symposium, which was held in Kafkas University between 14-15 August 2014 in memory of the 950th anniversary of the conquest of the Ani city by the Turks, was published."
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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

January 8th, 2017, 4:15 pm #2

I had heard of the symposium but have not yet seen the book (I think it was published in the second half of 2016).

Oktay Belli has made a career out of publishing these hefty "symposium" books - there are a whole series of them on Van, published almost yearly. Their contents consist of articles by various authors on various subjects and range from good to interesting to abysmally bad. Unfortunately, what is universal within the content is an uncritical acceptance of the official line - "restorations" are always good things, no matter how destructive or heavy-handed they might be in reality; history is always a pro-Turkish one; Armenian sites and influences tend to be minimised in importance.

For this volume on Ani, based on the facebook photos, it will be very interesting to see photographs of objects found during the 1990s-to-date excavations, none of which have ever been on public display. However, I'm not optimistic on the accuracy of the book's contents when they have a google earth plan of Ani with "Abugamir kilisesi" marked as being in the citadel!
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A.Schauer
A.Schauer

January 8th, 2017, 5:37 pm #3

Noting publication of an illustrated multilingual book titled: "I. Uluslararasi Ani - Kars Sempozumi: The First International Symposium of ANi - Kars". The editors are Oktay Belli, Ayhan Yardimciel, Vedat Evren Belli and Cengiz Celik.

I can't locate a webpage on the book. The "ANi City" Facebook feed https://www.facebook.com/AN%C4%B0-City- ... f=NEWSFEED) has photos of the book cover and some of its pages the information below in Turkish, and I've added teh Google Translate version below.

Turkish language: "ni şehrinin Türkler tarafından fethinin 950. yıldönümü anısına, 14-15 Ağustos 2014 tarihleri arasında Kafkas Üniversitesi bünyesinde düzenlenilen I. Uluslararası Ani ..Kars Sempozyumu'nun bildiriler kitabı yayımlandı.
Kitap için ..DOSTUM SAYIN HOCAM Ayhan Yardimciel'e Teşekkür Ederim."

Google Translate: "The book of the 1st International Ani .. Kars Symposium, which was held in Kafkas University between 14-15 August 2014 in memory of the 950th anniversary of the conquest of the Ani city by the Turks, was published."
Thanks for your hint on that Ani publication. In checking the Facebook-link you provided I also saw a book about Horomos monastery which publication I entirely missed and which promises to be interesting:

Edda Vardanyan: "Horomos Monastery: Art and History (Monographies Du Centre de Recherche D'Histoire Et Civilisation)", Hardcover: 544 pages, Publisher: Peeters (31 Dec. 2015), Language: English, ISBN-10: 2916716572, ISBN-13: 978-2916716572 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Horomos-Monast ... 2916716572)

Does anybody know this book? Do you have an opinion about its quaity?

Amazon describes it as follows:
"The monastery of Horomos is situated on the right bank of the Axurean river, about 5 km as the crow flies to the north-east of Ani, the Armenian "city of 1000 churches." When the monastery was founded (c. 930), Ani was still little more than a fortress. Soon, however, Ani grew into a royal city (960) and the seat of the Catholicos (992), while the humble monastic congregation became the "rest place of the Kings," the chaplaincy of the capital, an important cultural centre and showcase of Bagratid architecture. It continued to develop and prosper up to the end of the 13th century. From the 19th century onwards, the site was visited by learned travellers, who described the monuments and transcribed their inscriptions. About 1910, the famous historian of Armenian arts, T'oros T'oramanean, drew complete plans and elevations of the extant buildings, with a detailed account of their decoration. In 1920, however, Turkey annexed the province of Kars and Horomos was included in a military zone, inaccessible to archaeological research. Only in 2013 and 2014, were Armenian visitors able to penetrate the site again and to take new photographs of monuments and inscriptions. The present volume, with contributions by six authors, takes a fresh look at the site, providing exhaustive updated information. A comprehensive study of the history of the monastic congregation from the 10th to the 20th century is followed by a general survey of the architecture, a detailed examination of a new kind of monastic structure, the zamatun, endowed with rich symbolic decoration, a decipherment of the crosses and xac'k'ars, a review of the manuscript output of the scriptorium, and finally, an epigraphic corpus providing both a photograph and a drawing for each extant inscription, thus ensuring a much more complete and reliable text than in all previous editions and translations."
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A.Schauer
A.Schauer

January 8th, 2017, 5:46 pm #4

Here seems to be the Table of Contents:http://www.gbv.de/dms/casalini/3102808.pdf
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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

January 10th, 2017, 2:47 pm #5

Especially for the inscriptions (which are given translations into English and are individually analysed), the history of the monastery, and the architectural descriptions of each monument. However, the chapter on the octagonal dome of the gavit is an example of over analysis, imo, and the book's absolute certainty, despite the lack of physical or textual evidence, that the gavit was purpose-built as a royal mausoleum is also not convincing to me. The photos are scattered about the book a bit too much, and sometimes are too small to adequately illustrate what is being described.
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A.Schauer
A.Schauer

January 10th, 2017, 8:06 pm #6

Thanks
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