tried some technique but did not work

tried some technique but did not work

cj
cj

March 14th, 2005, 11:30 pm #1

I tried the restoring technique on plastic crystals from this site and it DID NOT WORK for me. What am I doing wrong? I scratched the crystal with sandpaper to even out the scratches and then I used brasso and a clean cloth to buff it out but still nothing. HELP!!!!
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Taz
Taz

March 14th, 2005, 11:42 pm #2

It does take some time especially if you have deep scratches. When using Wet/Dry sandpaper I find it best to sand with water and a little soap. Rewetting the sand paper under the faucet and rinsing the crystal during the process helps to keep the sand paper clean. I have take up to 10 minutes to sand out really deap scratches. If it is really deep, you can start with a lower grit rating like 200 and move to 400 then 1600. Just be carful not to sand too much and make the crystal to thin.

Are you sure the crystal is plastic?

It just take a little patience and persistance and you will get that brand new look.

Taz
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cj
cj

March 15th, 2005, 3:21 am #3

the watch is an old snoopy watch with the red baron and clouds acting as the second hand. this is a childs watch and of course it is not taken care of. i decided to experiment on it. do you know anything about the watch....like what kind of crystal it is? i assumed it is plastic but not sure.
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Taz
Taz

March 15th, 2005, 11:21 am #4

I am not sure myself. If it is plastic, you should have made some improvement to the crystal. My best guess is that you have not sanded enough to level out the scratches or the scratches are actually cracks that go much deeper.
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Ed
Ed

March 15th, 2005, 2:30 pm #5

I tried the restoring technique on plastic crystals from this site and it DID NOT WORK for me. What am I doing wrong? I scratched the crystal with sandpaper to even out the scratches and then I used brasso and a clean cloth to buff it out but still nothing. HELP!!!!
I seen, heard and tried some of the "so-called" techniques offered here.

Bottom line is, a Dremel with jewelers rouge (The reddish-brownish stuff that Dremel offers in their polishing kits) will do the trick. Or you can acquire a stick of jewelers rouge from a watch supply house.

Use the hard felt polishing tip (make sure you use the FELT polishing tips), with plenty of jewelers rouge applied (turn on your Dremel and dip it in the container of polishing compound) and then with medium pressure keep the Dremel moving back and forth over the entire crystal in the direction of the scratch(es). IMPORTANT: KEEP THE DREMEL MOVING. DO NOT PAUSE OVER A SINGLE SCRATCH AND LEAVE IT RUNNING. THIS WILL CAUSE RIPPLES ON THE SURFACE OF THE CRYSTAL. It may take 15 or 20 minutes, or so, to get the scratches out. But it is much less messy that toothpaste and Brasso. And you are using a compound designed for crystal polishing. Leave Crest or Colgate to your teeth, and Brasso to your brass objects. THEN, when you have removed the scratches, switch to the soft, 1/2 inch round polishing pad (it's soft and pliable and comes in the Dremel kit). Apply ample amounts of the polishing compound and with medium to firm pressure go over the entire crystal to give it a mirror shine. Do this for about 5 minutes or so.

Since you are using jewelers rouge, which becomes a powdery substance on your Dremel polishing tips, I recommend WEARING A DUST MASK WHEN YOU ARE POLISHING YOUR CRYSTALS. 3M makes some inexpensive dust masks available from your friendly Wal-Mart.

I have removed some VERY DEEP scratches from crystals in this manner, with no mess and no ripple spots in the finished product. Takes a little longer, but it works. Always examine your work in progress with your loupe so as to see when the scratches are removed.

BTW, this jewelers rouge is great for polishing stainless steel watch cases, or casebacks to remove scratches. I DO NOT recommend using this on chrome or gold-tone cases.

Hope this helps,

Ed
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Taz
Taz

March 15th, 2005, 3:44 pm #6

When a crystal is very bad, I sand it and remove the scratches, but when the crystal is lightly scuffed, I will take out the dremel and rouge and clear it up. I always buff the final product with Brasso. Gives it a really nice shine.

Sometimes a Dremel will leave some burn marks that are noticable under certain lighting conditions. If this bothers you, you can remove them by using 1600 grit sanding for about 1 minute then top it off with a brasso polishing.



Taz

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eD
eD

March 15th, 2005, 5:32 pm #7

The only time a Dremel will leave burn marks, is when you STOP MOVING THE DREMEL and let it grind away in one place. Or, if you are using the highest speed on your electric. I use the rechargable Dremel and the high speed is just right.

As I said in the post, KEEP THE DREMEL MOVING EVENLY over the surface of the crystal. Jewelers rouge is an extremely fine (almost micro-fine) abrasive, designed for plastic, metals (gold, silver, etc), and jewelry.

I still prefer toothpaste on my teeth, Brasso on my brass items, and jewelers rouge for crystals and jewelry. But, whatever floats your boat!

Cheers,

Ed
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Taz
Taz

March 15th, 2005, 5:45 pm #8

I use a rechargable just like you and do move back and forth without staying on the same path on high speed. My watch crystals look good. Then one day I was outside and the sun hit it just right and the paths I left were visible. I suggest you take you watch and look at different angles; you will see the marks. I went back and looked at all the ones that I did and the marks were there only noticable at cirtain angles to the light. So I cleared them up as I very particular on how my restorations look.


Brasso for you info is not just for brass. I suggest you read the label.

"Suggested Uses: Beds.Hardware.Ornements........Other Plastic Watch Crystals."

As for toothpaste. People have been using toothpaste as a polishing agent for many years. My grandmother used it to polish her Silverware. That was back in the early 70's.

Taz
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Ed
Ed

March 15th, 2005, 7:12 pm #9

We each have our favorite methods. I was just sharing another perspective, not trying to criticize your method.

I have examined my crystals in sunlight and under a high intensity lamp, and there are no visible ripples or burned spots. I know what you mean, as one of my early efforts at crystal polishing, produced the streak or ripple effect to which you referred.

Another solution is to use a larger soft polishing wheel on an electric shop motor, with a rheostat. That way you have more polishing surface with the edge of the polishing wheel, which is enough to cover the entire crystal. And you can control the speed of the motor. My local watchmaker has such a buffer and it prevents any ripples that would occur from smaller polishing devices.

Sorry if my responses offended you.

Cheers,

Ed
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Taz
Taz

March 15th, 2005, 10:33 pm #10

I didn't take the discussion any differently than you did. I like to argue and lay the facts on the table and let thing blow past without passing judgement. If I came accross that way, I am sorry. You did to me.

Taz
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