Plastic cased Timex opens through crystal?

Plastic cased Timex opens through crystal?

Ed Schweiger
Ed Schweiger

October 3rd, 2005, 4:59 am #1

I have an older Timex manual wind that is in a small diameter one-piece plastic case. The movement apparently comes out through the front of the case after the crystal is removed. I am able to remove the crystal, but cannot figure out how to remove the stem so I can lift out the movement. Could it be fitted with a split stem like some old Bulovas that lift out through the front of the case? I didn't want to be too forceful pulling on the stem.
Anyone have suggestions?

schweige
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technoguy
technoguy

October 3rd, 2005, 6:57 am #2

I think you'll see a hole in the dial near the 3 o'clock position. There is a tab in there that is pressed to release the stem. I do not think Timex used those "split" stems as are found on the higher priced watch brands.



technoguy
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John
John

October 3rd, 2005, 3:13 pm #3

I have an older Timex manual wind that is in a small diameter one-piece plastic case. The movement apparently comes out through the front of the case after the crystal is removed. I am able to remove the crystal, but cannot figure out how to remove the stem so I can lift out the movement. Could it be fitted with a split stem like some old Bulovas that lift out through the front of the case? I didn't want to be too forceful pulling on the stem.
Anyone have suggestions?

schweige
also find a hole in the backside of the watch. The hole may be hidden with a "plug" of either the screw out type or a type that you use a small screwdriver to pry out. If there is a plug there should be a small hole uner it to push a small tool into to release the "stem holder".
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RonD.
RonD.

October 3rd, 2005, 9:38 pm #4

I have an older Timex manual wind that is in a small diameter one-piece plastic case. The movement apparently comes out through the front of the case after the crystal is removed. I am able to remove the crystal, but cannot figure out how to remove the stem so I can lift out the movement. Could it be fitted with a split stem like some old Bulovas that lift out through the front of the case? I didn't want to be too forceful pulling on the stem.
Anyone have suggestions?

schweige
I think I had one of those. After you remove the crystal, see if there is a retainer ring around the dial that you can pry out with a tiny screw driver. If it was like mine, once the ring is removed, the dial just snapped on. After removing the dial, you can see where to push the spring down to remove the stem.

Ron
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Ed Schweiger
Ed Schweiger

October 4th, 2005, 5:39 am #5

The crystal is easily removed with a crystal lift, then there is a thin silver retaining ring that comes out. At this point the movement can be tipped up to see the edge of the pillar plate. Removing the hands does not release the dial, and it appears to be fastened to the pillar plate by tabs on the edge of the dial being bent through slots on the periphery of the plate.
The water resistant case appears to be a single piece of injection molded plastic labeled made in Philippines. There are no holes in the dial, nor any plugged holes in the case that I can find.
I'm still at a loss. I'll keep trying if anyone has any other suggestions.
Thanks to all for the help.

Ed Schweiger
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technoguy
technoguy

October 4th, 2005, 8:19 am #6

This is the last thing I would try and it is a bit risky. Just pull the crown out to the setting position and try to physically pull in out of the movement. Maybe it is not held in with a standard setting lever, but is made so that a sufficiently strong tug will allow it to disengage from the setting lever.



Again, I must caution you that this is risky and, if I am wrong, it could permanently damage the setting lever. I would just give it a good tug and if it does not come free of the movement, then consider other options.



technoguy
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John
John

October 4th, 2005, 6:01 pm #7

The crystal is easily removed with a crystal lift, then there is a thin silver retaining ring that comes out. At this point the movement can be tipped up to see the edge of the pillar plate. Removing the hands does not release the dial, and it appears to be fastened to the pillar plate by tabs on the edge of the dial being bent through slots on the periphery of the plate.
The water resistant case appears to be a single piece of injection molded plastic labeled made in Philippines. There are no holes in the dial, nor any plugged holes in the case that I can find.
I'm still at a loss. I'll keep trying if anyone has any other suggestions.
Thanks to all for the help.

Ed Schweiger
it Ed. I was hoping you would solve this thing. I have a watch on my bench that I'm having the same problem with.(not a Timex). I can't find anything that looks like it will release the stem.I'm about to the point of saying if it is not a two part stem then it's going to be broken.
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Ed Schweiger
Ed Schweiger

October 5th, 2005, 5:19 am #8

I think I had one of those. After you remove the crystal, see if there is a retainer ring around the dial that you can pry out with a tiny screw driver. If it was like mine, once the ring is removed, the dial just snapped on. After removing the dial, you can see where to push the spring down to remove the stem.

Ron
I finally got the movement out of the case! With a good bit of forcing/twisting, I actually got the movement turned over enough (With the stem and crown still attached and through the stem tube) to get the stem retaining screw out. The stem looked normal enough, but it was a larger diameter near the crown and there was an o-ring at the base of the crown. Out of curiosity I held the flat end of the stem in a hand vise and was able to turn the crown section off. The crown has a short shaft of its own that is fitted with the o-ring and is female threaded at the end. The stem has male threads and the crown must be attached after the movement is installed in the case. The threads were tight all the way off so they must put some sort of a thread locker on when they screw on the crown to keep it from working off the stem during use. This watch was definitely designed to never be opened.
I did no appreciable damage to the case as the plastic is somewhat flexible. I'll see if I can get the movement cleaned up as it was only running intermittently before. It's small and brightly colored so maybe my seven year old daughter will like it.
Thanks for the advice everyone.

Ed Schweiger
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RonD.
RonD.

October 6th, 2005, 1:22 pm #9

I am curious about the movement in that Timex. Is it a $22? Like I said earlier, mine had dial tabs that went straight down and snapped into the movement. I did hear of others that required you to hold onto the stem and unscrew the winding crown.

Ron
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Paul N.
Paul N.

October 6th, 2005, 10:55 pm #10

I finally got the movement out of the case! With a good bit of forcing/twisting, I actually got the movement turned over enough (With the stem and crown still attached and through the stem tube) to get the stem retaining screw out. The stem looked normal enough, but it was a larger diameter near the crown and there was an o-ring at the base of the crown. Out of curiosity I held the flat end of the stem in a hand vise and was able to turn the crown section off. The crown has a short shaft of its own that is fitted with the o-ring and is female threaded at the end. The stem has male threads and the crown must be attached after the movement is installed in the case. The threads were tight all the way off so they must put some sort of a thread locker on when they screw on the crown to keep it from working off the stem during use. This watch was definitely designed to never be opened.
I did no appreciable damage to the case as the plastic is somewhat flexible. I'll see if I can get the movement cleaned up as it was only running intermittently before. It's small and brightly colored so maybe my seven year old daughter will like it.
Thanks for the advice everyone.

Ed Schweiger
Here's how to get the movement out of these kind of watches - this method also applies to Timexes with the older one-piece aluminum cases. Once you get the crystal off and the spacer ring under it, you will see a slot by the 'three'. Look through there and you will see that there is a flat spot milled into the stem. Now you will have to make a tool - really a very small open end wrench. I used a small piece of brass, but a screwdriver bit would do as well - it's just easier for me to file down brass rather than steel. The wrench must have a 1mm wide opening that is about 1 1/2 mm dep. the whole thing should be about 3 or 4 mm wide by 1 mm (or less) thick. Put that into the slot and aound the milled out secion. All you have to do now is unscrew the crown.

Hope this helps some.
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