The dimensions of motion - out of curiosity!

The dimensions of motion - out of curiosity!

Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

April 20th, 2009, 7:16 pm #1

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
Last edited by millhouse23 on April 21st, 2009, 2:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

April 20th, 2009, 7:36 pm #2

Attitude, perception, perspective, internal representations, applying ones understanding to the nature of movement and action and reaction, mind, whatever you want to call it plays a major role in the movement of the body. So another 4th direction or dimension to consider would be, "Inside, Out".

As for time, I stuck a thing on here some years back after going through a bunch of lecture notes on temporal variants, and the role they play in application of basics in techniques. I'll see if I can find it again, again (looked for it recently to e/m someone).

D.
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Joined: April 10th, 2005, 11:41 pm

April 20th, 2009, 9:11 pm #3

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
Good questions.
Something that has been in our training since I can remember is the Timing Signature of a technique.

The Timing Signature of a technique forces our students to pause after significant strikes, assess, then continue. The concept is rooted in the Paired Rhythm of the technique, which is simply the concept of only moving as fast as allowed when considering the attackers reactions.

Built in from day one as a white belt.
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Joined: March 5th, 2005, 2:18 pm

April 21st, 2009, 12:09 am #4

That's pretty much what I teach.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
peterson_charlie@hotmail.com

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Joined: August 14th, 2004, 8:13 am

April 21st, 2009, 7:00 am #5

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
I have a drill I like to teach students in order for them to develop the correct timing in regards to action to action. I have the student stand upright hands at their side, then I walk by them a couple of times at a distance of about 5 to 6 feet having them monitor my movement, then I step in toward them. You find that when you cross the line of personal physical space dictated by visio perception the student naturally wants to move away.

When you practice this with awareness you can actually feel the stimulus in the eyes, similar to holding your hand away from your face then bringing it toward you. It is a naturally inherent gauge of distance, and as you all know time is measured in distance. Once the student recognizes the phenomena I then have them perform a tech for instance five swords. If you have them do the tech before the drill then after the effect is confident, focused, concise, economized and naturally structured movement with increased power and stability.

It eliminates the do it by wrote approach and replaces it with a natural stimulus response.

best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF
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Joined: February 13th, 2004, 1:04 am

April 21st, 2009, 7:10 pm #6

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
To assist in those who need to know a Formula on ways for Concepts and Principles to be used as a tool for dealing with all Phases of Engagement....Ideal/What-If/ Formulation. Then proceed with learning the "Academic vs Combative" side of things....great post!
TCB...

TCB....Sean Kelley
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Joined: October 25th, 2007, 1:41 pm

April 21st, 2009, 7:44 pm #7

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
We have been working on timing a bit. Some techs have the one beat count, others have a two beat count, some seem (to me) to have some quarter or half notes.

I was told to try doing techs and forms and listen to the sound of the footwork on the floor - Csteps/7's/straight line foot manuevers sound different. There is a different sound when you pivot your foot. Those sounds can help you figure out your timing of the lower parts.
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Joined: October 20th, 2006, 6:21 pm

April 22nd, 2009, 1:39 am #8

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
Speed kills you but timing kills the other guy.Sometimes we talk about it in terms of music,quarter beat,half beat ,full beat.Then there is the time between beats or strikes.Good topic.
Tony
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Joined: February 5th, 2004, 6:37 pm

April 22nd, 2009, 5:24 am #9

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
One of the aspects of time I like to talk about is shortening or lengthening the time of engagement. For example, if I increase the distance between myself and my opponent, I have effectively increased the time I have to respond to his attack, and I have also increased the time it takes for his attack to hit me. If I shorten the distance between myself and my opponent, I have decreased the time I have to respond to his attack, and I have also decreased the time it takes for his attack to hit me. However, by controlling the distance between us, I also control the time of the engagement. By stepping into the attack, I immediately change the dynamics of the engagement. My opponent will not be expecting the engagement to occur in that new time frame, allowing me to gain control of when the engagement takes place. By stepping back, my opponent will have to engage after he thought his initial attack would have landed. This gives me the upper hand, since I will be ready to engage in this new time frame, while he must regroup in order to throw another attack.
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

April 22nd, 2009, 8:00 am #10

We all know that there are three dimensions of motion: height, width, and depth that are taught in our system. Ultimately, however, there is a fourth dimension: time.

Out of curiosity, who teaches this fourth dimension, and if you do, how do you teach it as related to our system?

Thought it would be a good discussion.

Michael Miller, CKF
I guess that sooner or later this is going to get out, so it might as well be sooner than later. This video was played recently at Chuck Sullivan's 50 Years in Kenpo celebration. In it Chuck discusses a rarely known kenpo technique known to only a few as "Mind Fogging," which arguably enters into Mr. Miller's added dimensions. From what I've been able to gather, the Old Man taught this technique to only a few of the original students.

Salute


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7f9cFII5lrg

Last edited by kenpotom on April 22nd, 2009, 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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