So there we were, working on Lone Kimono,

So there we were, working on Lone Kimono,

Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

May 12th, 2011, 11:29 am #1

and Delayed Sword pops up in my mind. Cool, now I can show Leticia (who is 7 years old) how LK is similar to DS. But how to get the similarity across without bogging down the lesson of the technique? Well, this is why teaching is more fun than learning for me at this point in time. I tell her that the moves in LK are kinda like DS. She looks at me with a questioning face, pauses, shrugs her shoulders and doesn't connect the name to the attack or the defense.

Oh crap! I've derailed the lesson. What to do? Wait, I tell her, "It's the first yellow belt technique." BING! Her eyes light up and as I am about to say something she says, "Oh yeah, but the kick is missing!" With a smile on her face she rocked the cup chopped the neck! Two lessons in one technique.

Okay, so Leticia is the coolest thing in a uniform for 20 seconds and her poppa is proud of her ability to reference previous material with a small nudge. This is why teaching is so much fun. She learns the lesson within the technique.

Clark
WE ARE THE BORG........................IT'S A MYTHOLOGY NOT A LIFESTYLE
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Joined: September 18th, 2009, 4:26 pm

May 12th, 2011, 2:03 pm #2

good work helping her understand the lesson/knowledge!

I have found working with some of our yellow belts from time to time that the more specific you are, the better. "if I take the kick out of delayed sword, what movements do I have?" right inward block, right outward handsword.
"ok, great, now, in lone kimono, don't I do the same thing after I've hyperextended the arm?"

then you might ask, where else do these movements appear? and that gets them searching for it, thinking about it, seeking the connections.
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Joined: May 1st, 2006, 1:49 pm

May 12th, 2011, 3:19 pm #3

and Delayed Sword pops up in my mind. Cool, now I can show Leticia (who is 7 years old) how LK is similar to DS. But how to get the similarity across without bogging down the lesson of the technique? Well, this is why teaching is more fun than learning for me at this point in time. I tell her that the moves in LK are kinda like DS. She looks at me with a questioning face, pauses, shrugs her shoulders and doesn't connect the name to the attack or the defense.

Oh crap! I've derailed the lesson. What to do? Wait, I tell her, "It's the first yellow belt technique." BING! Her eyes light up and as I am about to say something she says, "Oh yeah, but the kick is missing!" With a smile on her face she rocked the cup chopped the neck! Two lessons in one technique.

Okay, so Leticia is the coolest thing in a uniform for 20 seconds and her poppa is proud of her ability to reference previous material with a small nudge. This is why teaching is so much fun. She learns the lesson within the technique.

Clark
WE ARE THE BORG........................IT'S A MYTHOLOGY NOT A LIFESTYLE
Yes, you learn so much when you teach, bright kid to get some sort of handle on what you were teaching.
Yes, the joys of a proud dad having a shared interest with his daugther, spending quality time, teaching something he enjoys, that will benefic her.
Being there, done that, you have many good times ahead of you watching the little lady develope in her kenpo and in life.

Memories brought back,
Thanks

A Kenpo Student.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

May 12th, 2011, 9:51 pm #4

good work helping her understand the lesson/knowledge!

I have found working with some of our yellow belts from time to time that the more specific you are, the better. "if I take the kick out of delayed sword, what movements do I have?" right inward block, right outward handsword.
"ok, great, now, in lone kimono, don't I do the same thing after I've hyperextended the arm?"

then you might ask, where else do these movements appear? and that gets them searching for it, thinking about it, seeking the connections.
I am constantly learning about teaching. Making sure that I find the right combination of words, visualizations and just plain ole hot hands application (always on me though) and I am having so much fun watching my students as they ask good questions and hit targets with weapons.

Clark
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