Parting wings

Parting wings

Joined: August 14th, 2004, 8:13 am

August 12th, 2008, 5:01 pm #1

Great post earlier, as many people lack confidence in the delivery and effectiveness of this technique. Here is some input.

It is always important to analyze the techs from within the parameters of the system this helps to clearly define the scope of the particular process of application and its expected result.

The question must first be asked what is the motivation behind the technique, is it a high to mid push, a low push or an attempted mid section tackle? It is defined in book 5 as a two handed push, which would offer any of the variables above. A push is defined as an exertion of force typically by hand in order to move them away from oneself or the origin of force.

The parting of the wings can be achieved at any height level, but because in the ideal phase we insert a thrusting chop to the left side rib cage it is safe to assume it is no higher than chest and no lower than bottom of rib cage. This allows for quick circular contouring of the left arm into a chop to opponents rib cage continuing with the right hand (after left chop) into a straight line middle knuckle to solar plexus or above.

The question was, "Why the chop"? Well let’s look at it.

The hands are open at the raising of the arms into a defensive posture. They are raised from point of origin in the open hand position, to simulate a natural defensive reaction. As one practices the tech, it is recognized that the raising of the elbows into an open ended triangular position, triggers a nervous muscular to skeletal response that travels throughout the body, reaching the tips of the fingers and the soles of the feet, stiffening the body in anticipation of impact.

At the moment of impact with the hands in open position it is recognized that the tendons and ligaments stiffening through the forearm have tightened and fortified the hand naturally, even if the fingers are spread. We of coarse practice with fingers closed resulting in a modified hand sword structure. This is advantages in several ways, least not that the chop can easily be rotated into a grab, check or press and allows for greater leverage in regards to consequential reactions as a result of defensive posturing (Remember this is happening super quick and anything can happen).

The right hand sword now shoots from point of origin already fortified (economy of motion). The delivery to the left rib cage allows for several possible action reaction consequences, one is that with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage. Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force, the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory, allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth, (Note that the width zone has already been disturbed at the moment of initial contact, a by product of the neutral bow).

It is interesting to note that depth cancellation is achieved far more easily with the utilization of height control.

Looking at the tech from this prospective, then one is able to see the sequential opportunities that arise from the naturally activated defensive sequential flow, and the benefits of such at this formative level, thus allowing for greater insight into the system when analyzed.

As EP stated, "Don't memorize, analyze". Always look at cause an effect; always turn to the fundamentals of the system to discover the reasons for application.

Remember the techs are ideas of motion developed not only for possible application but also for the stimulation of the creative thought process. The greater the understanding, the greater the internalized result, the greater the confidence in application.

I personally cannot stress enough the study of dimensional zone control and how it is achieved to maximum effect by the utilization of both defensive and offensive movement, and the consequences of such.

Domination of the opponent is not only a study of the above but also the greater science behind Kenpo.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.

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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

August 12th, 2008, 5:04 pm #2

Beautifully stated. I agree completely.

Michael Miller, CKF
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Joined: August 14th, 2004, 8:13 am

August 12th, 2008, 5:24 pm #3

Glad you liked it, and while we are at it I would like to say, I am an admirer of your dedication to and your dissemination of EP American Kenpo. Keep up the good work.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
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Joined: June 19th, 2004, 10:07 am

August 12th, 2008, 5:45 pm #4

Great post earlier, as many people lack confidence in the delivery and effectiveness of this technique. Here is some input.

It is always important to analyze the techs from within the parameters of the system this helps to clearly define the scope of the particular process of application and its expected result.

The question must first be asked what is the motivation behind the technique, is it a high to mid push, a low push or an attempted mid section tackle? It is defined in book 5 as a two handed push, which would offer any of the variables above. A push is defined as an exertion of force typically by hand in order to move them away from oneself or the origin of force.

The parting of the wings can be achieved at any height level, but because in the ideal phase we insert a thrusting chop to the left side rib cage it is safe to assume it is no higher than chest and no lower than bottom of rib cage. This allows for quick circular contouring of the left arm into a chop to opponents rib cage continuing with the right hand (after left chop) into a straight line middle knuckle to solar plexus or above.

The question was, "Why the chop"? Well let’s look at it.

The hands are open at the raising of the arms into a defensive posture. They are raised from point of origin in the open hand position, to simulate a natural defensive reaction. As one practices the tech, it is recognized that the raising of the elbows into an open ended triangular position, triggers a nervous muscular to skeletal response that travels throughout the body, reaching the tips of the fingers and the soles of the feet, stiffening the body in anticipation of impact.

At the moment of impact with the hands in open position it is recognized that the tendons and ligaments stiffening through the forearm have tightened and fortified the hand naturally, even if the fingers are spread. We of coarse practice with fingers closed resulting in a modified hand sword structure. This is advantages in several ways, least not that the chop can easily be rotated into a grab, check or press and allows for greater leverage in regards to consequential reactions as a result of defensive posturing (Remember this is happening super quick and anything can happen).

The right hand sword now shoots from point of origin already fortified (economy of motion). The delivery to the left rib cage allows for several possible action reaction consequences, one is that with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage. Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force, the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory, allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth, (Note that the width zone has already been disturbed at the moment of initial contact, a by product of the neutral bow).

It is interesting to note that depth cancellation is achieved far more easily with the utilization of height control.

Looking at the tech from this prospective, then one is able to see the sequential opportunities that arise from the naturally activated defensive sequential flow, and the benefits of such at this formative level, thus allowing for greater insight into the system when analyzed.

As EP stated, "Don't memorize, analyze". Always look at cause an effect; always turn to the fundamentals of the system to discover the reasons for application.

Remember the techs are ideas of motion developed not only for possible application but also for the stimulation of the creative thought process. The greater the understanding, the greater the internalized result, the greater the confidence in application.

I personally cannot stress enough the study of dimensional zone control and how it is achieved to maximum effect by the utilization of both defensive and offensive movement, and the consequences of such.

Domination of the opponent is not only a study of the above but also the greater science behind Kenpo.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
Great post, Bryan.

Hope you're well!

Cheers

Diane
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Joined: November 6th, 2006, 11:51 pm

August 12th, 2008, 6:27 pm #5

Great post earlier, as many people lack confidence in the delivery and effectiveness of this technique. Here is some input.

It is always important to analyze the techs from within the parameters of the system this helps to clearly define the scope of the particular process of application and its expected result.

The question must first be asked what is the motivation behind the technique, is it a high to mid push, a low push or an attempted mid section tackle? It is defined in book 5 as a two handed push, which would offer any of the variables above. A push is defined as an exertion of force typically by hand in order to move them away from oneself or the origin of force.

The parting of the wings can be achieved at any height level, but because in the ideal phase we insert a thrusting chop to the left side rib cage it is safe to assume it is no higher than chest and no lower than bottom of rib cage. This allows for quick circular contouring of the left arm into a chop to opponents rib cage continuing with the right hand (after left chop) into a straight line middle knuckle to solar plexus or above.

The question was, "Why the chop"? Well let’s look at it.

The hands are open at the raising of the arms into a defensive posture. They are raised from point of origin in the open hand position, to simulate a natural defensive reaction. As one practices the tech, it is recognized that the raising of the elbows into an open ended triangular position, triggers a nervous muscular to skeletal response that travels throughout the body, reaching the tips of the fingers and the soles of the feet, stiffening the body in anticipation of impact.

At the moment of impact with the hands in open position it is recognized that the tendons and ligaments stiffening through the forearm have tightened and fortified the hand naturally, even if the fingers are spread. We of coarse practice with fingers closed resulting in a modified hand sword structure. This is advantages in several ways, least not that the chop can easily be rotated into a grab, check or press and allows for greater leverage in regards to consequential reactions as a result of defensive posturing (Remember this is happening super quick and anything can happen).

The right hand sword now shoots from point of origin already fortified (economy of motion). The delivery to the left rib cage allows for several possible action reaction consequences, one is that with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage. Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force, the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory, allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth, (Note that the width zone has already been disturbed at the moment of initial contact, a by product of the neutral bow).

It is interesting to note that depth cancellation is achieved far more easily with the utilization of height control.

Looking at the tech from this prospective, then one is able to see the sequential opportunities that arise from the naturally activated defensive sequential flow, and the benefits of such at this formative level, thus allowing for greater insight into the system when analyzed.

As EP stated, "Don't memorize, analyze". Always look at cause an effect; always turn to the fundamentals of the system to discover the reasons for application.

Remember the techs are ideas of motion developed not only for possible application but also for the stimulation of the creative thought process. The greater the understanding, the greater the internalized result, the greater the confidence in application.

I personally cannot stress enough the study of dimensional zone control and how it is achieved to maximum effect by the utilization of both defensive and offensive movement, and the consequences of such.

Domination of the opponent is not only a study of the above but also the greater science behind Kenpo.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
Mr Parker once told me he did this tech to a stunt man on a movie set... I guess he doubted its validity- [big mistake]
-Sent the guy to the hospital...
I've always liked Parting Wings..
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

August 12th, 2008, 6:37 pm #6

Glad you liked it, and while we are at it I would like to say, I am an admirer of your dedication to and your dissemination of EP American Kenpo. Keep up the good work.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
I always enjoy your posts and would love to hear you on here more often. You have done a fine job yourself with the spreading of EPAK.

Salute,

Michael Miller
CKF
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

August 12th, 2008, 6:39 pm #7

Great post earlier, as many people lack confidence in the delivery and effectiveness of this technique. Here is some input.

It is always important to analyze the techs from within the parameters of the system this helps to clearly define the scope of the particular process of application and its expected result.

The question must first be asked what is the motivation behind the technique, is it a high to mid push, a low push or an attempted mid section tackle? It is defined in book 5 as a two handed push, which would offer any of the variables above. A push is defined as an exertion of force typically by hand in order to move them away from oneself or the origin of force.

The parting of the wings can be achieved at any height level, but because in the ideal phase we insert a thrusting chop to the left side rib cage it is safe to assume it is no higher than chest and no lower than bottom of rib cage. This allows for quick circular contouring of the left arm into a chop to opponents rib cage continuing with the right hand (after left chop) into a straight line middle knuckle to solar plexus or above.

The question was, "Why the chop"? Well let’s look at it.

The hands are open at the raising of the arms into a defensive posture. They are raised from point of origin in the open hand position, to simulate a natural defensive reaction. As one practices the tech, it is recognized that the raising of the elbows into an open ended triangular position, triggers a nervous muscular to skeletal response that travels throughout the body, reaching the tips of the fingers and the soles of the feet, stiffening the body in anticipation of impact.

At the moment of impact with the hands in open position it is recognized that the tendons and ligaments stiffening through the forearm have tightened and fortified the hand naturally, even if the fingers are spread. We of coarse practice with fingers closed resulting in a modified hand sword structure. This is advantages in several ways, least not that the chop can easily be rotated into a grab, check or press and allows for greater leverage in regards to consequential reactions as a result of defensive posturing (Remember this is happening super quick and anything can happen).

The right hand sword now shoots from point of origin already fortified (economy of motion). The delivery to the left rib cage allows for several possible action reaction consequences, one is that with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage. Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force, the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory, allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth, (Note that the width zone has already been disturbed at the moment of initial contact, a by product of the neutral bow).

It is interesting to note that depth cancellation is achieved far more easily with the utilization of height control.

Looking at the tech from this prospective, then one is able to see the sequential opportunities that arise from the naturally activated defensive sequential flow, and the benefits of such at this formative level, thus allowing for greater insight into the system when analyzed.

As EP stated, "Don't memorize, analyze". Always look at cause an effect; always turn to the fundamentals of the system to discover the reasons for application.

Remember the techs are ideas of motion developed not only for possible application but also for the stimulation of the creative thought process. The greater the understanding, the greater the internalized result, the greater the confidence in application.

I personally cannot stress enough the study of dimensional zone control and how it is achieved to maximum effect by the utilization of both defensive and offensive movement, and the consequences of such.

Domination of the opponent is not only a study of the above but also the greater science behind Kenpo.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
...of the earlier post regarding the hand sword to the ribcage and the effect of that particular strike, could you please elaborate on the following:

"...with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage."

(1) How exactly do you envision the hand sword contouring your opponent's ribcage - the operative word being "contour"?

and...

(2) "Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force..."

With regard to Parting Wings, what is this fitting principle and how exactly does it magnify force?

and...

(3) the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth

Is the idea of this strike to "press on the ribs"? And, if so, what is the desired effect on these organs (I'm assuming you're referring to the lower lobe of your opponent's left lung)? Or is the most desired result of this strike the cancellation of your opponent's height?

With respect,
tom bleecker
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Joined: March 14th, 2004, 4:27 am

August 12th, 2008, 6:58 pm #8

Great post earlier, as many people lack confidence in the delivery and effectiveness of this technique. Here is some input.

It is always important to analyze the techs from within the parameters of the system this helps to clearly define the scope of the particular process of application and its expected result.

The question must first be asked what is the motivation behind the technique, is it a high to mid push, a low push or an attempted mid section tackle? It is defined in book 5 as a two handed push, which would offer any of the variables above. A push is defined as an exertion of force typically by hand in order to move them away from oneself or the origin of force.

The parting of the wings can be achieved at any height level, but because in the ideal phase we insert a thrusting chop to the left side rib cage it is safe to assume it is no higher than chest and no lower than bottom of rib cage. This allows for quick circular contouring of the left arm into a chop to opponents rib cage continuing with the right hand (after left chop) into a straight line middle knuckle to solar plexus or above.

The question was, "Why the chop"? Well let’s look at it.

The hands are open at the raising of the arms into a defensive posture. They are raised from point of origin in the open hand position, to simulate a natural defensive reaction. As one practices the tech, it is recognized that the raising of the elbows into an open ended triangular position, triggers a nervous muscular to skeletal response that travels throughout the body, reaching the tips of the fingers and the soles of the feet, stiffening the body in anticipation of impact.

At the moment of impact with the hands in open position it is recognized that the tendons and ligaments stiffening through the forearm have tightened and fortified the hand naturally, even if the fingers are spread. We of coarse practice with fingers closed resulting in a modified hand sword structure. This is advantages in several ways, least not that the chop can easily be rotated into a grab, check or press and allows for greater leverage in regards to consequential reactions as a result of defensive posturing (Remember this is happening super quick and anything can happen).

The right hand sword now shoots from point of origin already fortified (economy of motion). The delivery to the left rib cage allows for several possible action reaction consequences, one is that with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage. Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force, the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory, allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth, (Note that the width zone has already been disturbed at the moment of initial contact, a by product of the neutral bow).

It is interesting to note that depth cancellation is achieved far more easily with the utilization of height control.

Looking at the tech from this prospective, then one is able to see the sequential opportunities that arise from the naturally activated defensive sequential flow, and the benefits of such at this formative level, thus allowing for greater insight into the system when analyzed.

As EP stated, "Don't memorize, analyze". Always look at cause an effect; always turn to the fundamentals of the system to discover the reasons for application.

Remember the techs are ideas of motion developed not only for possible application but also for the stimulation of the creative thought process. The greater the understanding, the greater the internalized result, the greater the confidence in application.

I personally cannot stress enough the study of dimensional zone control and how it is achieved to maximum effect by the utilization of both defensive and offensive movement, and the consequences of such.

Domination of the opponent is not only a study of the above but also the greater science behind Kenpo.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
Great post Brye,Zones and Leverage, Circles and Lines,= Stance Work & Stance Work
Speak with you soon Mate off to Kiwi Land and Rugby Yippie.
The Mad Stuntman
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

August 12th, 2008, 9:30 pm #9

...of the earlier post regarding the hand sword to the ribcage and the effect of that particular strike, could you please elaborate on the following:

"...with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage."

(1) How exactly do you envision the hand sword contouring your opponent's ribcage - the operative word being "contour"?

and...

(2) "Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force..."

With regard to Parting Wings, what is this fitting principle and how exactly does it magnify force?

and...

(3) the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth

Is the idea of this strike to "press on the ribs"? And, if so, what is the desired effect on these organs (I'm assuming you're referring to the lower lobe of your opponent's left lung)? Or is the most desired result of this strike the cancellation of your opponent's height?

With respect,
tom bleecker
Pancreas...very painful.

Insertions of the diaphragm at the ribs...impact induces myospasm, leading to "wind knocked out" effect (sealing the breath).

Junction between the transverse and descending colon...impact causes soft muscle spasm, leading to "gut cramp" feeling...pretty quick drop.

Spleen...main repository for blood and really big lymphois organ. Easily corrupted by impact, leading to interstitial distention (swelling)...pain; chronic issues from smaller bleeds; death or organ removal surgery for larger bleeds.

Distal ends of the unattached ribs, where they insert to the cartilagious "cups" of the costal cartilage...knock one free of that, leads to loss of wind, pain with straightening the torso or rotation at the waist; upper body exertion (like throewing a follow-up punch).

D.

PS -- trying to paste a picture of the digestive and respiratory and neuromusculoskeletal systems anatomical targets underlying this quadrant, but can't get it to paste. If I figger it out...
Last edited by DrDaveDC on August 12th, 2008, 9:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 12:37 pm

August 12th, 2008, 9:38 pm #10

Great post earlier, as many people lack confidence in the delivery and effectiveness of this technique. Here is some input.

It is always important to analyze the techs from within the parameters of the system this helps to clearly define the scope of the particular process of application and its expected result.

The question must first be asked what is the motivation behind the technique, is it a high to mid push, a low push or an attempted mid section tackle? It is defined in book 5 as a two handed push, which would offer any of the variables above. A push is defined as an exertion of force typically by hand in order to move them away from oneself or the origin of force.

The parting of the wings can be achieved at any height level, but because in the ideal phase we insert a thrusting chop to the left side rib cage it is safe to assume it is no higher than chest and no lower than bottom of rib cage. This allows for quick circular contouring of the left arm into a chop to opponents rib cage continuing with the right hand (after left chop) into a straight line middle knuckle to solar plexus or above.

The question was, "Why the chop"? Well let’s look at it.

The hands are open at the raising of the arms into a defensive posture. They are raised from point of origin in the open hand position, to simulate a natural defensive reaction. As one practices the tech, it is recognized that the raising of the elbows into an open ended triangular position, triggers a nervous muscular to skeletal response that travels throughout the body, reaching the tips of the fingers and the soles of the feet, stiffening the body in anticipation of impact.

At the moment of impact with the hands in open position it is recognized that the tendons and ligaments stiffening through the forearm have tightened and fortified the hand naturally, even if the fingers are spread. We of coarse practice with fingers closed resulting in a modified hand sword structure. This is advantages in several ways, least not that the chop can easily be rotated into a grab, check or press and allows for greater leverage in regards to consequential reactions as a result of defensive posturing (Remember this is happening super quick and anything can happen).

The right hand sword now shoots from point of origin already fortified (economy of motion). The delivery to the left rib cage allows for several possible action reaction consequences, one is that with correct alignment one achieves a fitting of the hand sword to the contour of the rib cage. Utilizing the fitting principle magnifies force, the rotation of the hand sword in its trajectory, allows you to press through in the downward diagonal, thus pressing the ribs into the interior of the body and its organs for effect, resulting in the canceling of height which in-turn cancels depth, (Note that the width zone has already been disturbed at the moment of initial contact, a by product of the neutral bow).

It is interesting to note that depth cancellation is achieved far more easily with the utilization of height control.

Looking at the tech from this prospective, then one is able to see the sequential opportunities that arise from the naturally activated defensive sequential flow, and the benefits of such at this formative level, thus allowing for greater insight into the system when analyzed.

As EP stated, "Don't memorize, analyze". Always look at cause an effect; always turn to the fundamentals of the system to discover the reasons for application.

Remember the techs are ideas of motion developed not only for possible application but also for the stimulation of the creative thought process. The greater the understanding, the greater the internalized result, the greater the confidence in application.

I personally cannot stress enough the study of dimensional zone control and how it is achieved to maximum effect by the utilization of both defensive and offensive movement, and the consequences of such.

Domination of the opponent is not only a study of the above but also the greater science behind Kenpo.

Best in Kenpo
Brye Cooper
UKF.
Mr Cooper,

Thank you very much for your input!!

Jeroen.
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