Motivation

Motivation

Joined: September 17th, 2007, 5:06 pm

September 18th, 2007, 6:20 pm #1



Someone whom I have great respect for once asked me to express my views on motivation. He asked what motivated me in my study, teaching, and how it related to my students.

They are very fair questions and I will attempt to share my point of view.

I stated that motivation is the act of getting someone to want to do what you know has to be done. Each person has triggers that relate to their mental development, these triggers or based on their emotional perception, morals, education, and beliefs.

Human nature leads a person to react within a (self-preservation latitude), while society has evolved into microwave mindset of, I want it now, and don’t wish to employ much effort in the process. The motivation for ones study has to be programmed into the person along with the biomechanical application of the principles of motion.

Motivation is a Conceptual mindset that has to be learned. We all have the need for instant gratification, however they are usually superficial reasons.

I spent 24 years in the US Army 5th Special Forces, and retired as a Command Sgt Major with multiple combat engagements. My perception of motivation is derived from this viewpoint, and the understanding that there is always someone better than I am. The responsibility of the teacher to train the student’s mental conditioning, in order to become a need, and no longer a want is necessary to travel beyond the self preservation aspect of the human mind.

What motivates me is the fear that I may represent myself in an inappropriate manner. Those whom I teach, and those who ask me for my insight deserve the best understanding of the knowledge, skill, and direction I can provide for them, within the context of their study. They also deserve better than I have to offer them, so my training has taken on a much deeper perspective.

Every person that studies a combative art has different reasons for doing so. Some do it for socialization, some for the physical work out, and some from fear and the need for self-defense. What ever the reason, what ever their desire, and whatever their goals may be, are sure to become challenged over time, for it takes hard work to get there. Their motivation is based on wants, needs, and desires, be it a black belt, conditioning etc.

We have to help guide and develop within that person the programmed mental conditioning that they will be able to devastate another human being to preserve their life, or the lives of the defenseless. This also has to be engrained within them to continue their development when there is no one around to carry them through their studies.
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

September 18th, 2007, 6:47 pm #2

1. Thank you for your service.

2. I liked the entire post, but could immediately relate to the last paragraph. Just last night while working with a student to move from a perspective of dominance and aggression, I had to paint an unkind picture for her. She got it, though. Authority and presence improved, and with them power, stability, and confidence in motion. Interestingly, what keyed her in is something I could not relate to. But it was right for her, and she was off & running.

Cheers, Sgt. Major. I look forward to mat time with you.

D.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

September 18th, 2007, 6:53 pm #3


Someone whom I have great respect for once asked me to express my views on motivation. He asked what motivated me in my study, teaching, and how it related to my students.

They are very fair questions and I will attempt to share my point of view.

I stated that motivation is the act of getting someone to want to do what you know has to be done. Each person has triggers that relate to their mental development, these triggers or based on their emotional perception, morals, education, and beliefs.

Human nature leads a person to react within a (self-preservation latitude), while society has evolved into microwave mindset of, I want it now, and don’t wish to employ much effort in the process. The motivation for ones study has to be programmed into the person along with the biomechanical application of the principles of motion.

Motivation is a Conceptual mindset that has to be learned. We all have the need for instant gratification, however they are usually superficial reasons.

I spent 24 years in the US Army 5th Special Forces, and retired as a Command Sgt Major with multiple combat engagements. My perception of motivation is derived from this viewpoint, and the understanding that there is always someone better than I am. The responsibility of the teacher to train the student’s mental conditioning, in order to become a need, and no longer a want is necessary to travel beyond the self preservation aspect of the human mind.

What motivates me is the fear that I may represent myself in an inappropriate manner. Those whom I teach, and those who ask me for my insight deserve the best understanding of the knowledge, skill, and direction I can provide for them, within the context of their study. They also deserve better than I have to offer them, so my training has taken on a much deeper perspective.

Every person that studies a combative art has different reasons for doing so. Some do it for socialization, some for the physical work out, and some from fear and the need for self-defense. What ever the reason, what ever their desire, and whatever their goals may be, are sure to become challenged over time, for it takes hard work to get there. Their motivation is based on wants, needs, and desires, be it a black belt, conditioning etc.

We have to help guide and develop within that person the programmed mental conditioning that they will be able to devastate another human being to preserve their life, or the lives of the defenseless. This also has to be engrained within them to continue their development when there is no one around to carry them through their studies.
is that you please keep posting,

I've clicked on everyone and read through and through. Can't say that about most of the others going on at the moment.

Great job, sir and I hope we get to meet face to face sometime.

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: September 17th, 2007, 5:06 pm

September 18th, 2007, 6:55 pm #4

1. Thank you for your service.

2. I liked the entire post, but could immediately relate to the last paragraph. Just last night while working with a student to move from a perspective of dominance and aggression, I had to paint an unkind picture for her. She got it, though. Authority and presence improved, and with them power, stability, and confidence in motion. Interestingly, what keyed her in is something I could not relate to. But it was right for her, and she was off & running.

Cheers, Sgt. Major. I look forward to mat time with you.

D.
It will be my Honor Dr. Dave. Reservations are made.


PS.

Dr. Dave is the person I refered too in my post
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

September 18th, 2007, 6:56 pm #5

1. Thank you for your service.

2. I liked the entire post, but could immediately relate to the last paragraph. Just last night while working with a student to move from a perspective of dominance and aggression, I had to paint an unkind picture for her. She got it, though. Authority and presence improved, and with them power, stability, and confidence in motion. Interestingly, what keyed her in is something I could not relate to. But it was right for her, and she was off & running.

Cheers, Sgt. Major. I look forward to mat time with you.

D.
Kudos, Dave,

As I know how hard it can be to get across to women the necessity of agression when it comes to saving their necks. Forget the that's what little girls are made of stuff and get your head to a place you need to in order to live another day.

Hat's off to anyone that can get a woman there

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

September 18th, 2007, 7:01 pm #6

is that you please keep posting,

I've clicked on everyone and read through and through. Can't say that about most of the others going on at the moment.

Great job, sir and I hope we get to meet face to face sometime.

Back to the mats,

Angela
You passed the Angela test. Perhaps one of the most difficult approvals to accomplish in kenpoland, and likely one of the most important. "To be thought well of by intelligent peers..." part of an old Brit academic toast.

D.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

September 18th, 2007, 7:07 pm #7

Not sure everyone would agree,

But the fact that you do goes a long way.

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: September 17th, 2007, 5:06 pm

September 18th, 2007, 7:18 pm #8

is that you please keep posting,

I've clicked on everyone and read through and through. Can't say that about most of the others going on at the moment.

Great job, sir and I hope we get to meet face to face sometime.

Back to the mats,

Angela
I will try. I look forward to true sharing with others.
Im sure there will be a time that we will meet. Kenpo land is smaller then we think.
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Joined: February 6th, 2004, 1:18 pm

September 19th, 2007, 12:34 am #9

You passed the Angela test. Perhaps one of the most difficult approvals to accomplish in kenpoland, and likely one of the most important. "To be thought well of by intelligent peers..." part of an old Brit academic toast.

D.
Dr. Dave,

I have had the pleasure of communicating with Angela (only because we have not been in the same place to meet face to face) over the past several years. I have had the great pleasure to meet and train with Mr Marshall.

I truly believe that when they meet, they will truly enjoy the time spent together with Kenpo. Both have a passion for it that I find very refreshing. Both have a great way of communicating "their kenpo" to others.

What I find most interesting (and am very greatful for) is that I consider both of these individuals to be very good friends.

I look forward to the day that I finally meet Ms. Angela. I also look forward to the day that I get to share the mat with Mr Marshall again. Better yet would be to have it all happen at the same time.

Thanks to two of my best Kenpo friends for sharing and helping me understand kenpo better.

Salute,
Brad
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Joined: March 7th, 2005, 3:46 am

September 19th, 2007, 3:11 am #10


Someone whom I have great respect for once asked me to express my views on motivation. He asked what motivated me in my study, teaching, and how it related to my students.

They are very fair questions and I will attempt to share my point of view.

I stated that motivation is the act of getting someone to want to do what you know has to be done. Each person has triggers that relate to their mental development, these triggers or based on their emotional perception, morals, education, and beliefs.

Human nature leads a person to react within a (self-preservation latitude), while society has evolved into microwave mindset of, I want it now, and don’t wish to employ much effort in the process. The motivation for ones study has to be programmed into the person along with the biomechanical application of the principles of motion.

Motivation is a Conceptual mindset that has to be learned. We all have the need for instant gratification, however they are usually superficial reasons.

I spent 24 years in the US Army 5th Special Forces, and retired as a Command Sgt Major with multiple combat engagements. My perception of motivation is derived from this viewpoint, and the understanding that there is always someone better than I am. The responsibility of the teacher to train the student’s mental conditioning, in order to become a need, and no longer a want is necessary to travel beyond the self preservation aspect of the human mind.

What motivates me is the fear that I may represent myself in an inappropriate manner. Those whom I teach, and those who ask me for my insight deserve the best understanding of the knowledge, skill, and direction I can provide for them, within the context of their study. They also deserve better than I have to offer them, so my training has taken on a much deeper perspective.

Every person that studies a combative art has different reasons for doing so. Some do it for socialization, some for the physical work out, and some from fear and the need for self-defense. What ever the reason, what ever their desire, and whatever their goals may be, are sure to become challenged over time, for it takes hard work to get there. Their motivation is based on wants, needs, and desires, be it a black belt, conditioning etc.

We have to help guide and develop within that person the programmed mental conditioning that they will be able to devastate another human being to preserve their life, or the lives of the defenseless. This also has to be engrained within them to continue their development when there is no one around to carry them through their studies.
Mr. Marshall,

A very thought provoking and well stated article, Sir. You are a man whom I admire, respect and am deeply grateful to for your dedication and service to Kenpo and our country.

Thank you for taking the time to share this insight and perspective from such a personal point of view. I look forward to seeing in October.

Your Brother,

Robert Ashmore
Arsenal American Kenpo
Integrated Kenpo Karate Academies
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