more inspiration from infinite insights book 1

more inspiration from infinite insights book 1

Joined: September 18th, 2009, 4:26 pm

November 13th, 2010, 6:56 pm #1

This entry is helping me with my spinning back kicks. It's the most awkward fundamental for me, I bet that's a common issue.

Anyway.

"the primitive stage is one of awkwardness and the climb toward excellence is not an easy one. it is an important stage requiring patience on both the part of the student as well as the instructor. here a student is taught the alphabets and phonetics of motion. he is taught the mechanics of how to do each move and not so much how the moves can be used. at this stage proper attitude is a must in accepting the fact that WORK will be required to overcome awkwardness. it is here that the ingredient of perseverence takes over. through proper and gradual adjustment, a student soon learns to adapt to his or her new environment. but above all it is at this stage where a student begins to understand that the martial arts is a man's quest to understand himself and obtain the maximum from his mind and body. analyzing each weakness he strengthens his awareness and overcomes is awkwardness. it is through overcoming his awkwardness that he learns to better understand himself. he also learns that as long as his awkwardness prevails the art will continue to remain intangible. not until his reactions become spontaneous can he convert the art to a tangible and working entity."
Last edited by Inkspill on November 13th, 2010, 6:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

November 13th, 2010, 8:10 pm #2

This idea of movement and motion, doing it over and over and over, hundreds of times...

Homework is the key to success, learn it at the dojo perfect it, and do the movement...

Similar to perfecting the golf swing on the practice range, so you can call on it when you have to make the shot...

In hitting bags, you do it thousands of times and then it becomes natural for you... Can't say it enough, practice and training on your own, to perfect your abilities...

Their are no secrets it is up to the individual to excel, similar to lifting weights you have to do it over and over again...No free lunch!!!

Shooting a firearm is the same especially the handgun you have to handle it all the time, fondle the empty weapon, open it, close it, pull the trigger hundreds of times a night for a few months, after that practice is needed to keep it up same as Kenpo, then when needed it is natural...

Regards

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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

November 14th, 2010, 12:38 am #3

This entry is helping me with my spinning back kicks. It's the most awkward fundamental for me, I bet that's a common issue.

Anyway.

"the primitive stage is one of awkwardness and the climb toward excellence is not an easy one. it is an important stage requiring patience on both the part of the student as well as the instructor. here a student is taught the alphabets and phonetics of motion. he is taught the mechanics of how to do each move and not so much how the moves can be used. at this stage proper attitude is a must in accepting the fact that WORK will be required to overcome awkwardness. it is here that the ingredient of perseverence takes over. through proper and gradual adjustment, a student soon learns to adapt to his or her new environment. but above all it is at this stage where a student begins to understand that the martial arts is a man's quest to understand himself and obtain the maximum from his mind and body. analyzing each weakness he strengthens his awareness and overcomes is awkwardness. it is through overcoming his awkwardness that he learns to better understand himself. he also learns that as long as his awkwardness prevails the art will continue to remain intangible. not until his reactions become spontaneous can he convert the art to a tangible and working entity."
What does your base leg do before during and after the spinning back kick?
(pivot point, knee straight or bent, degree of pivot)


Does your spine remain fairly straight or do you lean away from the kick?

At the moment of impact is your back to your opponent or are you more sideways?

What part of your foot makes first contact with the target?

What path do your eyes take when doing this kick?

When do you start to breath out on this kick?
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Joined: September 18th, 2009, 4:26 pm

November 14th, 2010, 2:18 am #4

My right spinning back kick is getting pretty good, turning to the cat, spine erect, bending and lifting to position one while I look over the shoulder behind me, fire the kick and return to position one, step down across the toe line into cover step position and cover back to face the target.


My left spinning back kick from a right neutral bow has the most trouble. I've been feeling some pain in my right ankle when I try to keep the knee bent, I jacked my ankle years ago and it gets this weird tension, then if I move it enough it'll pop and then hurts less. I need to practice more is all, the more I practice the better it will get.

I'm the only one who stands in my way, I know what I need to do, and it's my Kenpo, I need to do what I know, make myself DO. But each day is a new day. I made myself practice all my blue stuff. Tomorrow is all my basics and my blue, then Monday is yellow and then class. Tuesday is orange and Wednesday is purple and class. Just gotta practice every day. Brain is a goal seeking mechanism.
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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

November 14th, 2010, 4:17 am #5

Sounds like you have a good handle on it. I feel your pain with the ankle injury, I jacked my right ankle up about two years ago and it has never been the same. I can still kick well enough but running over so many miles causes me to walk with a limp until I can rest it again. I keep trying to figure out some way to get it back to 100% but no luck so far. Anyway good luck with your training.
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Joined: September 18th, 2009, 4:26 pm

November 16th, 2010, 8:06 pm #6

I talked it over with my teacher yesterday after class and more was revealed, as I turned to the cat my foot was falling onto the side, instead of pivoting directly on the ball of my foot, he helped me understand the point of pivot better and as soon as I get off work today I'll be making my sbk even better.
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