Kenpo and the Brain

Kenpo and the Brain

Joined: February 24th, 2004, 3:14 pm

March 29th, 2009, 3:33 pm #1

Last night my wife Barbara and I had the pleasure of attending a PBS segment being filmed. Dr. Daniel Amen,M.D. is a neuro-scientist, psychiatrist, and best selling author. The filming took about 4 hrs but the time flew by as it was all so interesting. He is also a yellow belt at our school. We were at the Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Dr. Amen had some great insight on how our brain controls so many functions of the body, in fact the name of the show is, The Brain in Love. This is also the name of his new book that will be released in August.
As Dr. Dave Crouch mentioned earlier in a post, the brain can be damaged by blunt force trauma as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Dr. Amen is in a new movie called The Last Round, which is about brain damage caused by boxing. This information has really impacted the way I look at contact at our school. With the recent death of Natasha Richardson in a skiing accident, and the overwhelming evidence of brain damage to NFL players, it is obvious to me that we need to be extra vigilant in protecting our students. The idea of hitting a soccer ball with your head, as an example, is dangerous. In a system that is based on logic, we have to apply logic to living our lives and the way we approach our sports.
The good news that I want to share with you is that Dr. Amen mentioned last night that there are tremendous benefits of studying kenpo karate. The obvious physical exercise, which leads to a healthier brain, is over shadowed by the fact that kenpo stimulates the brain and enhances thinking, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed. You have to get your hands, your eyes, and your feet to all work together at the same time, while you are thinking about your curriculum. What a great thing to be able to share with parents that their children can become smarter as a result of their training in kenpo. For those of us who have a passion for kenpo, this is one more great attribute for what we do.
Alcohol, caffeine, bad diet, and lack of exercise can lead to negative reactions to the brain. He has proven that keeping your brain healthy leads to a longer and more productive life. I suggest reading Dr. Amen`s books and if you get a chance watch his PBS shows.
Respectfully,
Bob White
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Joined: March 10th, 2008, 4:57 am

March 29th, 2009, 3:47 pm #2

Mr. White,
Excellent post! I would love to have been there for Dr. Daniels show. You however bring up some very valid points to the marvel that is the human brain. I recently finished a psychology class that allowed me to better understand the cognitive development process and how this works for children, (things I just never knew). A light bulb went on and I have had more fun working with the kids in my class over the last month then in the previous twenty years. So just to add (if I may) to your already great post, The understanding of the psychology of the human brain will help a tremendous amount when it comes to being or striving to be a good or great Kenpo teacher. Some things are learned with time, but why not get a head start (pun intended) on the job by taking a psych class or two.
Good Stuff!!!
Todd Durgan
Last edited by sumdumguy on March 29th, 2009, 3:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 9th, 2003, 1:19 pm

March 30th, 2009, 3:39 am #3

Yes this is very interesting SGM White Sir. Does Dr. Amen talk about the relationship between the brain and relaxation? Our ancestors in the Art talked at being at peace. I've been taught about being in the moment, and i'm still learning more about that statement today. It has lead me to the study of the brain. Sir my wife was hit by a van, and spent 6 days in ICU. She could only remember one name 'Amen'. She slowly got her memory back, but i had to take her for many visits to her Neo Doctor. He really explained to me exactly how delicate our brains are. Wamboi is all better today, but 2 years now she still can't recall the day she was hit. Her brain has blocked it out.

www.geocities.com/kkfkenpo
www.geocities.com/africansportkarate
kkfkenpo@yahoo.com
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Joined: February 5th, 2004, 6:37 pm

March 30th, 2009, 7:26 am #4

Last night my wife Barbara and I had the pleasure of attending a PBS segment being filmed. Dr. Daniel Amen,M.D. is a neuro-scientist, psychiatrist, and best selling author. The filming took about 4 hrs but the time flew by as it was all so interesting. He is also a yellow belt at our school. We were at the Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Dr. Amen had some great insight on how our brain controls so many functions of the body, in fact the name of the show is, The Brain in Love. This is also the name of his new book that will be released in August.
As Dr. Dave Crouch mentioned earlier in a post, the brain can be damaged by blunt force trauma as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Dr. Amen is in a new movie called The Last Round, which is about brain damage caused by boxing. This information has really impacted the way I look at contact at our school. With the recent death of Natasha Richardson in a skiing accident, and the overwhelming evidence of brain damage to NFL players, it is obvious to me that we need to be extra vigilant in protecting our students. The idea of hitting a soccer ball with your head, as an example, is dangerous. In a system that is based on logic, we have to apply logic to living our lives and the way we approach our sports.
The good news that I want to share with you is that Dr. Amen mentioned last night that there are tremendous benefits of studying kenpo karate. The obvious physical exercise, which leads to a healthier brain, is over shadowed by the fact that kenpo stimulates the brain and enhances thinking, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed. You have to get your hands, your eyes, and your feet to all work together at the same time, while you are thinking about your curriculum. What a great thing to be able to share with parents that their children can become smarter as a result of their training in kenpo. For those of us who have a passion for kenpo, this is one more great attribute for what we do.
Alcohol, caffeine, bad diet, and lack of exercise can lead to negative reactions to the brain. He has proven that keeping your brain healthy leads to a longer and more productive life. I suggest reading Dr. Amen`s books and if you get a chance watch his PBS shows.
Respectfully,
Bob White
Mr. White presents a strong statement about the need to protect our students. When I first started training in kenpo (about 11 yrs ago) and competing in tournaments, the sparring rules were that color belts could only hit to the body, and focus shots (no contact) to the head or face. I don't know when these rules were developed, but they served two purposes. The first was for the protection of the students. Having untrained students with no control belting each other in the head is dangerous. The second purpose was to teach students a good body punch. Over the years these rules have been relaxed, first at tournaments, and then at the studios I have trained at (to keep up with the tournament rules). Now more than ever, I see guys slugging it out on the sparring floor, without any regard for the injury they may suffer themselves, or give to their opponents.

I think what disturbs me the most is that the rules in tournaments for kids now let them hit to the head, and I can't tell you how many times I have heard parents and instructors tell their kids to knock off their opponents heads. The utter disregard for the safety of their kid's opponent is sickening. Children's skulls are not fully developed and are more easily susceptible to damage, even with head gear on. As instructors, our students put their trust in us to protect them, to not give them more than they are capable of handling. They trust us, because we have the experience. Parents trust us with their kids, but in this regard, I think we are failing. What is the benefit of allowing kids to hit each other in the head when sparring? We have increased the risk to their well being for no real purpose. I hope that Mr. White's post will give us pause to think about how we can best serve our student's interest. I also would like those instructors who promote tournaments, judge at tournaments, or send students to tournaments, to have a real discussion about the sparring rules, to make sure the risk involved at a tournament is worth the reward for competing at it.


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Joined: February 24th, 2004, 3:14 pm

March 30th, 2009, 12:50 pm #5

Mr. White,
Excellent post! I would love to have been there for Dr. Daniels show. You however bring up some very valid points to the marvel that is the human brain. I recently finished a psychology class that allowed me to better understand the cognitive development process and how this works for children, (things I just never knew). A light bulb went on and I have had more fun working with the kids in my class over the last month then in the previous twenty years. So just to add (if I may) to your already great post, The understanding of the psychology of the human brain will help a tremendous amount when it comes to being or striving to be a good or great Kenpo teacher. Some things are learned with time, but why not get a head start (pun intended) on the job by taking a psych class or two.
Good Stuff!!!
Todd Durgan
Hello Mr. Durgan
I have not seen you in a while and I hope you are doing well. Thank you for your reply. I would be interested in what you have learned in your class to help in the instruction of children. I respect your desire for continuing education and I have the same desire. Anything you can share that will help would be appreciated.
Respectfully,
Bob White
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Joined: May 30th, 2005, 8:31 pm

March 30th, 2009, 3:45 pm #6

Last night my wife Barbara and I had the pleasure of attending a PBS segment being filmed. Dr. Daniel Amen,M.D. is a neuro-scientist, psychiatrist, and best selling author. The filming took about 4 hrs but the time flew by as it was all so interesting. He is also a yellow belt at our school. We were at the Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Dr. Amen had some great insight on how our brain controls so many functions of the body, in fact the name of the show is, The Brain in Love. This is also the name of his new book that will be released in August.
As Dr. Dave Crouch mentioned earlier in a post, the brain can be damaged by blunt force trauma as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Dr. Amen is in a new movie called The Last Round, which is about brain damage caused by boxing. This information has really impacted the way I look at contact at our school. With the recent death of Natasha Richardson in a skiing accident, and the overwhelming evidence of brain damage to NFL players, it is obvious to me that we need to be extra vigilant in protecting our students. The idea of hitting a soccer ball with your head, as an example, is dangerous. In a system that is based on logic, we have to apply logic to living our lives and the way we approach our sports.
The good news that I want to share with you is that Dr. Amen mentioned last night that there are tremendous benefits of studying kenpo karate. The obvious physical exercise, which leads to a healthier brain, is over shadowed by the fact that kenpo stimulates the brain and enhances thinking, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed. You have to get your hands, your eyes, and your feet to all work together at the same time, while you are thinking about your curriculum. What a great thing to be able to share with parents that their children can become smarter as a result of their training in kenpo. For those of us who have a passion for kenpo, this is one more great attribute for what we do.
Alcohol, caffeine, bad diet, and lack of exercise can lead to negative reactions to the brain. He has proven that keeping your brain healthy leads to a longer and more productive life. I suggest reading Dr. Amen`s books and if you get a chance watch his PBS shows.
Respectfully,
Bob White
Mr. White, in 1995 I had a terrible accident at home, one night I passed through a window, I was sleepy, and cut myself with the glass in my stomach, I had my guts and internals on my hands, was like a Hara Kiri, can you imagine my wife of that moment waking up and asking ¿ what happen ? My response was " Nothing, just I´m dying " ( not the most smart answer) . I was 15 days in Hospital, almost dye, and for me were two points that saved me, * how I controlled the emotions to take decisions ( call to neighbor Doctor ), calm my family and control myself. In Hospital I conytrolled all my emotions as I could, my brain worked perfectly and I did not became in desesperation and nothing, always with a smile in my face ( hard to believe ). I knew this would be very important for my family how they could see me. * The second point was my faith in Jesus, I said is his Will, and I´m sure I heard " is not your moment yet but you have a mission here " . For another time I could tell you more, but I´m sure my control of my mind was thanks for the 22 years of training in Kenpo at that time, march 5, 23:30 hrs., 1995.
Regards
Sergio Correa
Santiago Chile.
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

March 30th, 2009, 11:35 pm #7

Last night my wife Barbara and I had the pleasure of attending a PBS segment being filmed. Dr. Daniel Amen,M.D. is a neuro-scientist, psychiatrist, and best selling author. The filming took about 4 hrs but the time flew by as it was all so interesting. He is also a yellow belt at our school. We were at the Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Dr. Amen had some great insight on how our brain controls so many functions of the body, in fact the name of the show is, The Brain in Love. This is also the name of his new book that will be released in August.
As Dr. Dave Crouch mentioned earlier in a post, the brain can be damaged by blunt force trauma as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Dr. Amen is in a new movie called The Last Round, which is about brain damage caused by boxing. This information has really impacted the way I look at contact at our school. With the recent death of Natasha Richardson in a skiing accident, and the overwhelming evidence of brain damage to NFL players, it is obvious to me that we need to be extra vigilant in protecting our students. The idea of hitting a soccer ball with your head, as an example, is dangerous. In a system that is based on logic, we have to apply logic to living our lives and the way we approach our sports.
The good news that I want to share with you is that Dr. Amen mentioned last night that there are tremendous benefits of studying kenpo karate. The obvious physical exercise, which leads to a healthier brain, is over shadowed by the fact that kenpo stimulates the brain and enhances thinking, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed. You have to get your hands, your eyes, and your feet to all work together at the same time, while you are thinking about your curriculum. What a great thing to be able to share with parents that their children can become smarter as a result of their training in kenpo. For those of us who have a passion for kenpo, this is one more great attribute for what we do.
Alcohol, caffeine, bad diet, and lack of exercise can lead to negative reactions to the brain. He has proven that keeping your brain healthy leads to a longer and more productive life. I suggest reading Dr. Amen`s books and if you get a chance watch his PBS shows.
Respectfully,
Bob White
are NOT the same!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxtUH_bHBxs


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Joined: February 24th, 2004, 3:14 pm

March 30th, 2009, 11:45 pm #8

Our church had this clip about a year ago. I purchased the 2 dvd`s that he has out and share them with our friends. He is very funny and delivers a great message. Dr. Amen has watched these dvd`s and mentioned that he enjoyed them. Thanks again Tom,
Bob White
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Joined: March 10th, 2008, 4:57 am

March 31st, 2009, 6:06 am #9

Hello Mr. Durgan
I have not seen you in a while and I hope you are doing well. Thank you for your reply. I would be interested in what you have learned in your class to help in the instruction of children. I respect your desire for continuing education and I have the same desire. Anything you can share that will help would be appreciated.
Respectfully,
Bob White
Well Mr. White
First off I am flattered that you remember me. Secondly I am no Dr. and my studies are not real extensive but the biggest thing that helped was the knowledge of two things, the cognitive development of children and the three styles of learning. I think that the four stages of cognitive development is pretty well known, so I kind of feel like and idiot just learning about it. The three different styles or methods that a person learns is also evidently common knowledge, and well I feel about the same. So I probably don't really have any insight to offer on this topic but It's helping me and that's really what counts, I suppose.

Understanding that we all develop in stages, is fairly common knowledge. Their are four stages of cognitive development that most people go through. Some never get past the first, second, or third, these people are usually seen as being mentally handicapped or retarded. These four stages are as follows; Sensorimotor Stage, Pre-operational Stage, Concrete operational Stage, and Formal Operational Stage. click here this link is one of many sources to research the four cognitive development stages.
It's really about taking some time and researching these topics through studies that have been done, after that realizing that those kids only pick up certain things and until it's rearranged to input (information) for them to comprehend. Logic does not play a part until late in the third or early into the fourth stage. Ok I have gone on long enough, I am sure everyone will have their two cents. This is my journey, and right now, it's good!!!
Keep your knees bent
Todd Durgan
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Joined: February 24th, 2004, 3:14 pm

March 31st, 2009, 1:37 pm #10

Thanks. I feel that the desire to be a good teacher is a major part of getting there. You seeking continued education to help with your teaching skills says quite a lot. You are right about it being your journey but it certainly makes your students journey more productive when their teacher is sensitive to how they learn.
Tom Bleecker posted something about John Wooden recently. If you get a chance I believe you would get some great teaching information from his books. As I have mentioned earlier his book,"Wooden on Leadership", is full of some great material. One of John Wooden`s quotes is, "Do not mistake activity for achievement". This immediatly reminded me of the the Freestyle Techniques. A lot to remember but not much upside.
Respectfully,
Bob White
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