I think that...

I think that...

Joined: February 25th, 2009, 8:54 am

May 14th, 2009, 12:52 am #1

kenpo is really cool. I do know however that nobody is capable of being really excellent at more than one or two strikes and a handful of other strikes that they are OK at. After that things fall apart. Now that is not a reason not to have a wide toolbox. But the fact is that most of your time should be training your base move/moves. The key is finding your best move/moves. Those are your strongest moves through which you can focus full intent. And though you may have a few good ones there will be only really one which is the base. Now for the most part idealistically this should be hitting off the back hand. There are exceptions like Bill Wallace but his methodology is not an ideal situation. So really unless you are in some way miraculously gifted at a more obscure move as is wallace then you are best training the punch off the back hand. That being the straight punch because it is more controllable. This is how I see it personally and I realize there are other opinions.
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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

May 14th, 2009, 1:31 am #2

For now I don't totally agree. I dont want to be overly focused on a few singular basics. I don't see the hang up with getting good at many different basics.

The way I am seeing it for now is that most of the basics travel down the same or similar lines of entry
So I work the pattern getting the motion in gear with
the correct principles. The weapons I change often.

So for example the Hammer Fist, Knuckle Rake, A claw or what ever "head" I put at the end of my mace still kind
of follows the same path so I work on my travel of the path and swap weapons, maybe a hammer fist for so many reps and then a fixed blade knife, then maybe a finger slice.

Maybe I'm wrong but I find that by keeping my focus on the patterns of motion I become more universal in my use of many basics. Pardon the pun.
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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

May 14th, 2009, 1:39 am #3

Something that I find interesting to work with is
core movement. If you look at just the motion the hips
make when throwing said basic, then work on that in isolation then relax the limbs and see how many other
moves use the same core motion. The basic becomes the
energy generated by your core and can then be expressed
through a multitude of different tools. That is one way
to get good at basics without having to limit yourself to just one punch or one kick. Your thoughts?
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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 8:54 am

May 14th, 2009, 2:32 am #4

that your observation is quite accurate and you need to train different moves. However I really feel that as far as having really excellent application you can only have one or two supreme moves. Now I mean relative to yourself. It may appear to others that you have many excellent moves but I really think comparatively we are only capable of a small core that achieves OUR maximum potential for ourselves. I think a defined and mature player will be able to quickly articulate their best strike when asked. Now I think we may be very good at many moves but in our heart of hearts we know what out most mature and cleanest strike is. I think we need to train that more than the others. At least mentally run the tape of it more and I think we naturally do.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 14th, 2009, 2:20 pm #5

When swinging a hammer you need the wrist, elbow and shoulder to accomplish it with power.

This is a similar statement:

**********
Kenpo students are usually aware of coordination of upper and lower body, but Tai Chi and stillness requires distinguishing between substantial and insubstantial; that is the amount of weight on each foot, when one leg is full and the other empty, or partially so, and which corresponding hand movement is substantial or insubstantial; that is, the amount of extension or force of each hand, arm, shoulder or back movement. With this one must be aware of where movement emanates. For instance, most Kenpo students begin the punch with the fist moving forward. But the actual movement must first come from the elbow; yet the elbow cannot move without the shoulder behind it; and, this is where most Kenpo students get their speed.
***********

Your best moves come naturally, why you need to train in others...

Regards
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Joined: July 10th, 2004, 10:13 pm

May 14th, 2009, 4:11 pm #6

that your observation is quite accurate and you need to train different moves. However I really feel that as far as having really excellent application you can only have one or two supreme moves. Now I mean relative to yourself. It may appear to others that you have many excellent moves but I really think comparatively we are only capable of a small core that achieves OUR maximum potential for ourselves. I think a defined and mature player will be able to quickly articulate their best strike when asked. Now I think we may be very good at many moves but in our heart of hearts we know what out most mature and cleanest strike is. I think we need to train that more than the others. At least mentally run the tape of it more and I think we naturally do.
I think we all get comfortable and "perfect" certain moves that become our "go to" in times of stress, but I think that "moves" are obviously very different than weapons....targets often dictate weapons so in the sense of moves, are you meaning all encompassing such as a particular technique to a particular target is your bread and butter? I'm not clear on what you mean by "moves"
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Joined: March 5th, 2005, 2:18 pm

May 14th, 2009, 6:24 pm #7

kenpo is really cool. I do know however that nobody is capable of being really excellent at more than one or two strikes and a handful of other strikes that they are OK at. After that things fall apart. Now that is not a reason not to have a wide toolbox. But the fact is that most of your time should be training your base move/moves. The key is finding your best move/moves. Those are your strongest moves through which you can focus full intent. And though you may have a few good ones there will be only really one which is the base. Now for the most part idealistically this should be hitting off the back hand. There are exceptions like Bill Wallace but his methodology is not an ideal situation. So really unless you are in some way miraculously gifted at a more obscure move as is wallace then you are best training the punch off the back hand. That being the straight punch because it is more controllable. This is how I see it personally and I realize there are other opinions.
Way back when, Dave Brock limited me to only two moves for a tournament in Laguna Beach. Only two. I got pretty good at those two moves and worked my way up the elimination ladder pretty well. The experiment worked. Then I ran into someone who could defend against both of those moves pretty well. End of experiment. I improved those two moves a lot but the lack of variety caused me to lose.

What you're saying has merit however I spend all of my time on the mat drilling to prove you wrong. So far, I think I'm pretty good at it. I may not be exceptional at any particular moves but I have pretty good repertoire of effective moves. I think the bad guy will be satisfied with my selection.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
peterson_charlie@hotmail.com

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