woops, completely ruined my project

woops, completely ruined my project

Joined: December 14th, 2010, 5:08 am

September 7th, 2012, 10:59 pm #1

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
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Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

September 7th, 2012, 11:39 pm #2



Steve
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Joined: April 23rd, 2012, 11:10 pm

September 8th, 2012, 12:40 am #3

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
Not air gun related, but...

Ceiling tile in my camper. Compound bend into the hallway. Two widths.

Measured. Measured again. Marked. Measured again. Cut.

It's short by 2 1/4 inches !

No idea how it happens, but it does !
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Joined: January 25th, 2009, 3:32 am

September 8th, 2012, 1:48 am #4

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
tap it and thread in a setscrew as a filler?
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Joined: March 1st, 2002, 12:22 am

September 8th, 2012, 2:31 am #5

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
for the mods class you just took

weve all dunnit....

my 1.5 397 build I made a shroud for the cut down barrel. Epoxied it over the factory barrel, made it look nice. PRoceeded quickly outgrow and then shoot apart said shroud, and decided to remove it to build a new better from what I d learned.

The 4 dollar tube of 5 minute epoxy from BoxMart is stronger than the bareel solder job, and the barrel ripped right off with the shroud

So I have a pair Donation to the cause if some one has need of barrel or pump toob for experimental purposes.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab

the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
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Joined: December 14th, 2010, 5:08 am

September 8th, 2012, 2:53 am #6

im gonna see if theres any way to use the stock on my HB22.

i have a bunch of (EVEN MORE) spare parts now to screw around with. or maybe i could just weld the hole shut.

hell.. i could even just add a whole bunch of weird shit to it and make it some kind of steampunk prop
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Joined: July 4th, 2012, 7:51 pm

September 8th, 2012, 4:02 am #7

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
....until I bought a replacement. That led to a procedural change. You get over things like that, but not at the time it happens .

 


Wyo
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Joined: June 11th, 2004, 3:53 pm

September 8th, 2012, 2:57 pm #8

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
you're not really 'smithing. If you're really 'into' it, you probably can't remember how many times you've had to fix an OOPS. Took me 3 years to find an use for a 2260 tube I drilled wrong for valve anchor screws.

Just have fun...

Be Well... Tom

"A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity." - Sigmund Freud
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 12:14 am

September 9th, 2012, 2:10 am #9

i went to drill a hole in my 392 tube to screw in a co2 cartridge to the valve and ended up drilling in the completely wrong spot. normally when im working on it i just put scratches in the brass where im about to work. well there happened to be an identical scratch about an inch away from where i was supposed to drill. i now have a big gaping hole in front of the valve face

that'll teach me to screw around when its 110 degrees in the shop (yeah, im just gonna blame the heat on this one)

:P
brass round tube is 'in stock" at my local Ace hardware store.

Cut a short length, then halve the diameter.

Small differences in diameter are easily bent to suit.
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