Who here has a 3D printer?

Who here has a 3D printer?

Joined: May 29th, 2014, 4:33 pm

June 1st, 2017, 9:50 pm #1

I've designed and tested a offset suppressor that is very quiet, due to there not being any metal surfaces that come in contact with the air turbulence. As plastic doesn't resonate like metal does, there is no high pitch tone.

The suppressor is made of three simple parts; the housing, the baffles and the barrel adapter. The adapter has four holes in the design that let's excess air out reducing turbulence behind the pellet and reducing the report from the muzzle end of the suppressor. The baffles has holes that gradually increase in size as the pellet goes through the suppressor,this should also reduce the report. The housing is held on by two screws. The adapter may need slight sanding to allow it to fit onto the barrel (mine is very tight a rubber mallet is needed to remove). You can drill and tap the adapter to make it more secure if you want to be cautious.

I'm not sure if the ATF will have a problem with this, so one should check their state laws!

This is much cheaper to make than buy a suppressor for an airgun. It may takes some time to print. I thought I'd start this thread and see if anyone is interested. It's on Thingiverse, but it's not the complete version and I will upload my current version this weekend.
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Joined: April 27th, 2008, 10:28 pm

June 2nd, 2017, 3:21 am #2

But I only use it for prototyping parts.

Production would be waaay too slow for our needs.

Mike T.
TKO22.com
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Joined: August 3rd, 2015, 11:39 pm

June 3rd, 2017, 11:34 am #3

I don't think it would handle 1500 psi, much less 3,000. I could be wrong. Send me and I'd be more than happy to field test it.
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

June 3rd, 2017, 2:55 pm #4

I've designed and tested a offset suppressor that is very quiet, due to there not being any metal surfaces that come in contact with the air turbulence. As plastic doesn't resonate like metal does, there is no high pitch tone.

The suppressor is made of three simple parts; the housing, the baffles and the barrel adapter. The adapter has four holes in the design that let's excess air out reducing turbulence behind the pellet and reducing the report from the muzzle end of the suppressor. The baffles has holes that gradually increase in size as the pellet goes through the suppressor,this should also reduce the report. The housing is held on by two screws. The adapter may need slight sanding to allow it to fit onto the barrel (mine is very tight a rubber mallet is needed to remove). You can drill and tap the adapter to make it more secure if you want to be cautious.

I'm not sure if the ATF will have a problem with this, so one should check their state laws!

This is much cheaper to make than buy a suppressor for an airgun. It may takes some time to print. I thought I'd start this thread and see if anyone is interested. It's on Thingiverse, but it's not the complete version and I will upload my current version this weekend.
could be printed on the monoprice select, a 200 dollar printer.. Sell 4 of them the printer was free and now you have a 3d printer. Yes, you will see horrible reviews on amazon , but talk to the experts and the monoprice cannot be beat for under 500
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Joined: May 29th, 2014, 4:33 pm

June 3rd, 2017, 3:25 pm #5

I've printed mine on £200 prusa clone from Amazon. They have had good reviews. And haven't regretted buying mine.
Last edited by qyuubi786 on June 3rd, 2017, 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 29th, 2014, 4:33 pm

June 3rd, 2017, 3:34 pm #6

I don't think it would handle 1500 psi, much less 3,000. I could be wrong. Send me and I'd be more than happy to field test it.
I've designed mine to be 3mm thick, it doesn't flex no matter how much I press on it. It definitely won't hold 3000psi of contained pressure but the pressure relief holes should let the pressure drop and keep it safe. As we are limited to sub 12ftlbs here in the UK feel free to test.
Last edited by qyuubi786 on June 3rd, 2017, 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 3rd, 2015, 11:39 pm

June 3rd, 2017, 11:06 pm #7

Sorry, I meant to clarify that exact point. Great idea, though. Maybe if you wrapped it, or maybe even encapsulated it, it would take more extreme pressures.
Like I said, send me one. We could see how much it could take. She's gonna blow, Captain ! LOL
Only $200 bucks for the printer huh ? It would be fun to try.
Thank you for the idea.

Mitch
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Joined: January 3rd, 2014, 6:48 pm

July 1st, 2017, 11:26 pm #8

I've designed and tested a offset suppressor that is very quiet, due to there not being any metal surfaces that come in contact with the air turbulence. As plastic doesn't resonate like metal does, there is no high pitch tone.

The suppressor is made of three simple parts; the housing, the baffles and the barrel adapter. The adapter has four holes in the design that let's excess air out reducing turbulence behind the pellet and reducing the report from the muzzle end of the suppressor. The baffles has holes that gradually increase in size as the pellet goes through the suppressor,this should also reduce the report. The housing is held on by two screws. The adapter may need slight sanding to allow it to fit onto the barrel (mine is very tight a rubber mallet is needed to remove). You can drill and tap the adapter to make it more secure if you want to be cautious.

I'm not sure if the ATF will have a problem with this, so one should check their state laws!

This is much cheaper to make than buy a suppressor for an airgun. It may takes some time to print. I thought I'd start this thread and see if anyone is interested. It's on Thingiverse, but it's not the complete version and I will upload my current version this weekend.
The BATFE shouldn't have a problem with your design, because it doesn't appear that it can be attached to a firearm. Well of course anything COULD be attached somehow--even an automotive oil filter. Also given the plain language in the Bill of Rights and Constitution, the ATF shouldn't have a problem either (LOL...yeah right)!

If you want to increase its strength (not necessarily what you'd want, given that a stronger device might be decreed to be a "silencer" by the ATF), then get a printer that
can handle polycarbonate nozzle temperatures, or maybe use a nylon filament formulation. Even a PC/ABS blend would offer an improvement and not be quite as challenging to print as PC and nylon.

ABS suffers from significant inter-layer bond weakness (what I call "grain" weakness). You can mitigate the shortcoming by dipping your parts in MEK (preferred) or acetone (not quite as good). They will come out cosmetically smoothed-over a bit and the layer bond strength will increase too. I was an experimenter and contributor in the early Defense Distributed days (right after Haveblue made his lower and then Cody Wilson set the media ablaze).

3D printing is a fun hobby and proving its capabilities was satisfying, but I prefer to machine lowers and parts and I hold a few ATF "silencer" Form 1 / tax stamps too.

-Cal
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