Shooting a 397..

Shooting a 397..

PZ1
Joined: July 31st, 2009, 2:05 pm

July 12th, 2012, 3:57 am #1

I read various sites. They all mention to store one pump ( or more ) before you place it away. Also they say not to cock before pumping, others recommend do not cock but leave the action open, others cock but do not load...etc before pumpimg.
Lube only the three pumping pivots and to check the pumper each time before you use it that these three pivot points display lube. The lube, such as Crosman PellGun Lube, will eventually lube the piston as well. Much of this information is not the "official" Crosman manual that is packed with a Benjamin. It is pump ( no more than 8 times for box stock 397..) then cock and load. Fire, and repeat.What is the current recommended proceedure for a box stock 397PA?
Thank you to all !
Pete
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Joined: February 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

July 12th, 2012, 11:40 am #2


Ah ha! Another new Benji owner!

When storing the rifle it is best not keep it cocked. If the spring of a spring-piston rifle will loose power by being stored cocked, so to will the hammer spring of a pumper. I put a pump or two of air into the gun and that's it when I put it away. I always pump first and then load. I guess I feel safer if loading is the last thing I do before shooting. I have an older Crosman rifle that needs to be cocked before pumping. It has a separate knob to cock it. I loaded it first one time and then pumped it without cocking it and the air charge was enough on the first pump to blow the pellet out the barrel right past my ear. Since then, no matter which pumper I'm shooting I pump first and then load.

The aluminum valve needs some oil in it to prevent corrosion. Keeping the pivot points well lubed is supposed to take care of it, but I like to put a drop right on the back side of the piston in my 392 (same gun just different caliber). You can see the back end of it in the pump slot with the pump arm fully extended. I have taken to lubing the Benji nearly every time I use it. It's on it's second valve and is working torwards its third - and it's only 4 years old! Hopefully your rifle has a brass valve.

One more thing, check inside the muzzle for paint overspray. If any is found it needs to be removed to get the best accuracy possible.


Anything that is complex is not useful and anything that is useful is simple
- Mikhail Kalashnikov
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PZ1
Joined: July 31st, 2009, 2:05 pm

July 12th, 2012, 1:07 pm #3

This is my third pumper. Had a Sheridan Blue Streak and a 392. I followed the routine. Pump, cock, load, fire. Put-a-way with one pump, etc. I looked at my bore, and it looked spotless, but I'll look again at the muzzle more carefully. Yes,it does have brass valving, luckily.
Thanks , Andy, for your tips !
Pete
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Joined: March 1st, 2002, 12:22 am

July 12th, 2012, 4:36 pm #4


that should go in the reference section


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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 12:14 am

July 15th, 2012, 12:51 am #5

The weight of the vehicle will load the springs and cause them to weaken and sag. Just like a cocked air gun.

or is this information inaccurate?

Perhaps different springs do different things when compressed. I KNOW that there is no reason that a compressed spring should be weakened by prolonged positioning in a compressed state. At least from a metalurgical stand point.

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