pellet molds

pellet molds

Joined: May 3rd, 2008, 8:44 pm

June 13th, 2008, 5:16 pm #1

can anyone tell me where to get a mold for some .22 pellets
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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 9:26 pm

June 13th, 2008, 5:50 pm #2

There are a lot of safety issues when messing with lead. Also it takes a lot of time to perfect the skill of molding pellets. In my opinion purchasing pellets is the best way to go.
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Joined: January 21st, 2008, 6:04 pm

June 13th, 2008, 6:43 pm #3

can anyone tell me where to get a mold for some .22 pellets
but have had no luck finding one in th U.S. I have seen a few old ones out of country but that drives the price up quite a bit(shipping & weak dollar).They cast a heavy type bullet one at a time, not really a pellet since it has no skirt.I contacted one or two custom mold makers that refused to try it...The main problem with that was I couldn't make them understand that it was for a pellet gun but that I really didn't care if it had a skirt or not.Most suggested I try swagging a pellet but the equipment to start up is expensive.If you find a mold please let me know.
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Joined: April 20th, 2008, 12:16 am

June 13th, 2008, 9:25 pm #4

There are a lot of safety issues when messing with lead. Also it takes a lot of time to perfect the skill of molding pellets. In my opinion purchasing pellets is the best way to go.
of us that have been casting our lead bullets for eons????? Casting pellets is no more dangerous that casting bullets. Get a copy of Lyman's Lead Casting Book and use common sense and it is a snap to do (of course with a proper furnace and other proper equipment) and very pleasueable. All you need are a set of molds or even one mold and away you go.
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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 9:26 pm

June 13th, 2008, 10:00 pm #5

The amount of time and energy spent making the pellets may not be worth it. It may also be really hard to get some good pellets out of the molds. He could spend countless hours working on a batch of pellets and only a few could come out well. But if he does decide to make his own he should probably try making round balls or bullet shaped pellets which would be far easier. He should also wear the proper equipment to prevent any lead from entering his body. Just be safe.
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Joined: April 20th, 2008, 12:16 am

June 13th, 2008, 10:36 pm #6

pellets would be a pain in the patooti!!! Probably very tedious trying to handle such small molds and then trying to decap them etc.; HOWEVER, I know some old codgers that get great pleasure doing anything that has to do with casting.

My mani point was that the danger in casting is almost nill IF proper ventilation and other safety practices are followed.

I myself buy my pellets. I still do some bullet casting but mostly buy now-a-days. Back when I started casting (1950s) it was a must in some cases as that was the only way to get/make certain bullets for odd ball/uncommon cartridges.
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

June 13th, 2008, 11:20 pm #7

can anyone tell me where to get a mold for some .22 pellets
..molds (they were once marketed by Beeman). Odd little brass molds that didn't really work quite like any other mold. Would case a spitzer shaped pellet with a thin flange around the base....flange would engrave the rifling fully, the pellet body would ride on top of the lands. Heavy pellets. Had the .177 and the .22; believe at lest some .20's and .25's were made.

Never did shoot real well in most guns, but if they happened to match your bore well, could shoot well enough to be useful. Becasue of the design, worked best in guns that inserted the pellet into the bore (pre-engraving them)...bold type guns, like Benajmains or the old Sterling springers.
------
this was snached from one of the on-line Beeman's sourses:

CASTING PELLETS

Commercial production of pellets is primarily by swaging. The shape of the diabolo pellet does not lend itself well to casting, but it is possible to cast some unusually heavy, bullet shaped pellets using some pellet molds. Because of their bullet shape, such pellets have greater friction, but the special shape and extreme weight, and the capacity for being homemade, makes these pellets of special interest to the serious airgun hunter, experimenter, and survivalist. The McGuire pellet mold casts sharply pointed "Spitzer", hollow-base bullet-shape pellets. The .177” (4.5 mm) pellet from these molds weighs 14 grains (0.91 gms.) and the .22” (5.5 mm) pellet weighs 20 grains (1.3 gms.). The best material for casting is melted down pellet lead retrieved from a metal pellet trap. Caution: Melting down pellet lead retrieved from a "silent" pellet trap which utilizes putty or other material to trap the pellets should be done with great caution and only where there is a great deal of ventilation and a fire extinguisher handy. Firearm bullet lead generally has a bit too much tin, zinc, or antimony to be soft enough for airgun pellets, but such material can be mixed with pure lead to make it satisfactory for this purpose. Very light oiling of these bullet style pellets probably is advisable.
Last edited by gubb33ps on June 13th, 2008, 11:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 20th, 2006, 3:00 pm

June 13th, 2008, 11:44 pm #8

pellets would be a pain in the patooti!!! Probably very tedious trying to handle such small molds and then trying to decap them etc.; HOWEVER, I know some old codgers that get great pleasure doing anything that has to do with casting.

My mani point was that the danger in casting is almost nill IF proper ventilation and other safety practices are followed.

I myself buy my pellets. I still do some bullet casting but mostly buy now-a-days. Back when I started casting (1950s) it was a must in some cases as that was the only way to get/make certain bullets for odd ball/uncommon cartridges.
A cast ten grain pure lead pellet without flaws would be a work of art.

Have you ever tired to cast .22 cal bullets? Even heavy ones with little surface like 60 grainers for gas checks are basically impossible without some Tin in the mix. You have to fight the low level of heat in that tiny charge of lead, decent fill out is hard to get. My best efforts with hard alloys were less than 50%. Most ended back up in the pot.

I too have the LEM mold for .22. IMO there's a reason it wasn't popular, basically you can't make useful pellets with 'em.

Doug Owen
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 12:49 am

June 14th, 2008, 12:39 am #9

especially if new to casting. I do a fair bit of casting, I've made hundreds of
slugs for my .50 and .30 and it works out cheaper than off the shelf, plus
it's enjoyable. The .30's are a fair bit trickier to cast without flaws because
of their small size. Those are 155gr, so imagine what 10 times smaller might
be like. Even if you find a way to make a few succesfully, will they be as
accurate as regular 2c apiece swaged pellets?
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Joined: January 21st, 2008, 6:04 pm

June 14th, 2008, 4:57 am #10

..molds (they were once marketed by Beeman). Odd little brass molds that didn't really work quite like any other mold. Would case a spitzer shaped pellet with a thin flange around the base....flange would engrave the rifling fully, the pellet body would ride on top of the lands. Heavy pellets. Had the .177 and the .22; believe at lest some .20's and .25's were made.

Never did shoot real well in most guns, but if they happened to match your bore well, could shoot well enough to be useful. Becasue of the design, worked best in guns that inserted the pellet into the bore (pre-engraving them)...bold type guns, like Benajmains or the old Sterling springers.
------
this was snached from one of the on-line Beeman's sourses:

CASTING PELLETS

Commercial production of pellets is primarily by swaging. The shape of the diabolo pellet does not lend itself well to casting, but it is possible to cast some unusually heavy, bullet shaped pellets using some pellet molds. Because of their bullet shape, such pellets have greater friction, but the special shape and extreme weight, and the capacity for being homemade, makes these pellets of special interest to the serious airgun hunter, experimenter, and survivalist. The McGuire pellet mold casts sharply pointed "Spitzer", hollow-base bullet-shape pellets. The .177” (4.5 mm) pellet from these molds weighs 14 grains (0.91 gms.) and the .22” (5.5 mm) pellet weighs 20 grains (1.3 gms.). The best material for casting is melted down pellet lead retrieved from a metal pellet trap. Caution: Melting down pellet lead retrieved from a "silent" pellet trap which utilizes putty or other material to trap the pellets should be done with great caution and only where there is a great deal of ventilation and a fire extinguisher handy. Firearm bullet lead generally has a bit too much tin, zinc, or antimony to be soft enough for airgun pellets, but such material can be mixed with pure lead to make it satisfactory for this purpose. Very light oiling of these bullet style pellets probably is advisable.
I'd like to give them a try.I hear they are a pain to work with but I'm tempted any way.
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