Metallurgy question...

Metallurgy question...

Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

June 25th, 2012, 3:20 pm #1

Hi guys,

Wondering if y'all know some temperature numbers for the heat treating of barrels, air chambers & miscellaneous parts on Crosman's?

Not sure where it applies, but thinking in terms of re-bluing parts, baked finishes, welding, brazing & soldering jobs at temperatures that might undo factory heat treatment if it exists. One method of blueing is to heat yellow or orange or near cherry red and quench in various types or weights of oil depending on desired finish. Even cold blue is better when parts are heated, but...?

I'm not sure which parts might have been heat treated in the first place except those that are obviously hardened like hammer sleeve etc. Any guidelines in general? No harm no foul? I'm aware of normalizing an entire piece after a process to realign grain throughout, so that parts don't warp, but wondering about those temps also. Suggestions?

Mine are vintage guns from the late 40's to mid 60's.

Thanks!
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Joined: August 29th, 2011, 4:50 pm

June 25th, 2012, 3:59 pm #2

All depends on alloy, really, different alloys get different treats, so to make it right you need the alloy and the process of treatment, ooooooor you could do what everyone else does and just guess!!! (and hope for the best) Dave.
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Joined: January 4th, 2010, 4:13 am

June 25th, 2012, 9:26 pm #3

Hi guys,

Wondering if y'all know some temperature numbers for the heat treating of barrels, air chambers & miscellaneous parts on Crosman's?

Not sure where it applies, but thinking in terms of re-bluing parts, baked finishes, welding, brazing & soldering jobs at temperatures that might undo factory heat treatment if it exists. One method of blueing is to heat yellow or orange or near cherry red and quench in various types or weights of oil depending on desired finish. Even cold blue is better when parts are heated, but...?

I'm not sure which parts might have been heat treated in the first place except those that are obviously hardened like hammer sleeve etc. Any guidelines in general? No harm no foul? I'm aware of normalizing an entire piece after a process to realign grain throughout, so that parts don't warp, but wondering about those temps also. Suggestions?

Mine are vintage guns from the late 40's to mid 60's.

Thanks!
I would not reccomend the quench method of bluing for reworked parts, unless you are possitive of the material and are confident of your heat treatment temps etc.
As far as needing to heat parts for soldering or bluing you shouldn't need to heat the part to the point of damaging the part. In the case of soldering you need to know the flow temp of the solder, it should be below the point where the metal would lose its hardness. Bluing solutions do not normally require heats so high that there is any danger of heat damage.

I suggest if at all possible to not re heatreat old parts if they need heat treatment consider replacing them, put the old part in a drawer and label it as the original until you find a replacment part, and if the replacement has the same problem experiment on that. At least you won't do any further damage to the original. As Dave stated unless you know for sure what type of metal you have you can only guess.

James S
Last edited by jamesinadvance on June 25th, 2012, 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 12th, 2002, 5:26 am

June 26th, 2012, 2:38 pm #4

Hi guys,

Wondering if y'all know some temperature numbers for the heat treating of barrels, air chambers & miscellaneous parts on Crosman's?

Not sure where it applies, but thinking in terms of re-bluing parts, baked finishes, welding, brazing & soldering jobs at temperatures that might undo factory heat treatment if it exists. One method of blueing is to heat yellow or orange or near cherry red and quench in various types or weights of oil depending on desired finish. Even cold blue is better when parts are heated, but...?

I'm not sure which parts might have been heat treated in the first place except those that are obviously hardened like hammer sleeve etc. Any guidelines in general? No harm no foul? I'm aware of normalizing an entire piece after a process to realign grain throughout, so that parts don't warp, but wondering about those temps also. Suggestions?

Mine are vintage guns from the late 40's to mid 60's.

Thanks!
even as a 35 year TIG welder. Exceptions are small parts I can heat treat afterwords.

Same with quench bluing. A boiling water bath over cold blue is good, so is rust blue.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

June 26th, 2012, 3:50 pm #5

Thanks for the tips.
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