How To: Camo Painting............with pics

How To: Camo Painting............with pics

Joined: May 8th, 2005, 8:32 pm

October 10th, 2006, 4:18 am #1

Though not an airgun, my recently purchased .223 coyote rifle needed to be painted in a camo pattern. Here is what I did to make a high desert camo paint job that sorta matches my camo clothing. The hardest part was taking abrand new rifle and scope set up, and performing the following steps (irreversible in most ways). Anywho here is what I did.


First I picked up the major colors I would need in Ultra Flat Camo Paint from the hardware store. $6 a can, but enough to do many many rifles, or other things.



I also was fortunate that my girlfriend is into scrapbooking, and has many differnt stencils lyin around. Picked a few out that I thought would work well.



Next is masking off that which you do not want to be covered in paint. For me, I covered the yardage and power markings, as well as making darn sure that the lenses were covered. I used 3M Professional masking tape.





Next is that hard part, after this step it is near impossible to go back, so BE ABSOLUTELY SURE you wish to paint your rifle at this point.
So now that it is masked up, use a scotch pad to scuff every surface you wish to paint, this ensures proper adhesion. Be sure to do a good job, as any smooth surfaces will be prone to flaking and chipping.





Next I hung the gun from a strap stud and cleaned all oil from the gun using a volitile solvent, so that it dries fast. After cleaning it do not touch the surface with bare fingers.
At this point you are ready to lay your base color. Here in the sesert we have a LOT of tan, so I used that as my base. Again, here work from a set of camo clothes that you know to work well in your area.
It is also important to take proper safety precautions. You will notice I am inside. Because of that i put a fan blowing air out of the garage, and used a professional, microm painters mask. These fumes are harmful, and proper ventilation is key, outside being best. If you do for any reason start to feel nausious, stop immediately and sit down away from the area. Get fresh air and if problems increase of persist, contact emergency care.



I painted the gun a base tan.



then using the stencils started layering the other colors.





Doont worry, you can always add layers of colors to achieve your desired effect. Once you are satisfied, it simply becomes the waiting game for it to dry. I reccommend at least 24 hours before any seriopus use. The nice thing is that you can alter the design by simply starting over at the masking stage. After time the paint will wear off in high use areas, so it will be necessary to touch up the paint every so often.

The final product is ready for some field testing.







Hope this helps someone.
-Klayton

Uniqueness is my weakness
Last edited by kiddmen57 on October 10th, 2006, 4:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 27th, 2006, 8:07 pm

October 10th, 2006, 4:44 am #2

<IMG alt=IMG_34652.jpg src="http://www.network54.com/Realm/tmp/1160 ... JPG">&nbsp;

_______________________________________

I shoot things that don't shoot back.
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Ivan (HeadHunter_PR)
Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
ivan_copo@hotmail.com
http://headhunterpr.spaces.msn.com
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Joined: August 27th, 2003, 3:46 am

October 10th, 2006, 10:42 am #3

Though not an airgun, my recently purchased .223 coyote rifle needed to be painted in a camo pattern. Here is what I did to make a high desert camo paint job that sorta matches my camo clothing. The hardest part was taking abrand new rifle and scope set up, and performing the following steps (irreversible in most ways). Anywho here is what I did.


First I picked up the major colors I would need in Ultra Flat Camo Paint from the hardware store. $6 a can, but enough to do many many rifles, or other things.



I also was fortunate that my girlfriend is into scrapbooking, and has many differnt stencils lyin around. Picked a few out that I thought would work well.



Next is masking off that which you do not want to be covered in paint. For me, I covered the yardage and power markings, as well as making darn sure that the lenses were covered. I used 3M Professional masking tape.





Next is that hard part, after this step it is near impossible to go back, so BE ABSOLUTELY SURE you wish to paint your rifle at this point.
So now that it is masked up, use a scotch pad to scuff every surface you wish to paint, this ensures proper adhesion. Be sure to do a good job, as any smooth surfaces will be prone to flaking and chipping.





Next I hung the gun from a strap stud and cleaned all oil from the gun using a volitile solvent, so that it dries fast. After cleaning it do not touch the surface with bare fingers.
At this point you are ready to lay your base color. Here in the sesert we have a LOT of tan, so I used that as my base. Again, here work from a set of camo clothes that you know to work well in your area.
It is also important to take proper safety precautions. You will notice I am inside. Because of that i put a fan blowing air out of the garage, and used a professional, microm painters mask. These fumes are harmful, and proper ventilation is key, outside being best. If you do for any reason start to feel nausious, stop immediately and sit down away from the area. Get fresh air and if problems increase of persist, contact emergency care.



I painted the gun a base tan.



then using the stencils started layering the other colors.





Doont worry, you can always add layers of colors to achieve your desired effect. Once you are satisfied, it simply becomes the waiting game for it to dry. I reccommend at least 24 hours before any seriopus use. The nice thing is that you can alter the design by simply starting over at the masking stage. After time the paint will wear off in high use areas, so it will be necessary to touch up the paint every so often.

The final product is ready for some field testing.







Hope this helps someone.
-Klayton

Uniqueness is my weakness
That is just the info I needed for&nbsp;the camo painting on my new stock , juast have to finish the fore arm.

&nbsp;

//Robert
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Joined: February 14th, 2006, 5:33 pm

October 10th, 2006, 11:50 am #4

Though not an airgun, my recently purchased .223 coyote rifle needed to be painted in a camo pattern. Here is what I did to make a high desert camo paint job that sorta matches my camo clothing. The hardest part was taking abrand new rifle and scope set up, and performing the following steps (irreversible in most ways). Anywho here is what I did.


First I picked up the major colors I would need in Ultra Flat Camo Paint from the hardware store. $6 a can, but enough to do many many rifles, or other things.



I also was fortunate that my girlfriend is into scrapbooking, and has many differnt stencils lyin around. Picked a few out that I thought would work well.



Next is masking off that which you do not want to be covered in paint. For me, I covered the yardage and power markings, as well as making darn sure that the lenses were covered. I used 3M Professional masking tape.





Next is that hard part, after this step it is near impossible to go back, so BE ABSOLUTELY SURE you wish to paint your rifle at this point.
So now that it is masked up, use a scotch pad to scuff every surface you wish to paint, this ensures proper adhesion. Be sure to do a good job, as any smooth surfaces will be prone to flaking and chipping.





Next I hung the gun from a strap stud and cleaned all oil from the gun using a volitile solvent, so that it dries fast. After cleaning it do not touch the surface with bare fingers.
At this point you are ready to lay your base color. Here in the sesert we have a LOT of tan, so I used that as my base. Again, here work from a set of camo clothes that you know to work well in your area.
It is also important to take proper safety precautions. You will notice I am inside. Because of that i put a fan blowing air out of the garage, and used a professional, microm painters mask. These fumes are harmful, and proper ventilation is key, outside being best. If you do for any reason start to feel nausious, stop immediately and sit down away from the area. Get fresh air and if problems increase of persist, contact emergency care.



I painted the gun a base tan.



then using the stencils started layering the other colors.





Doont worry, you can always add layers of colors to achieve your desired effect. Once you are satisfied, it simply becomes the waiting game for it to dry. I reccommend at least 24 hours before any seriopus use. The nice thing is that you can alter the design by simply starting over at the masking stage. After time the paint will wear off in high use areas, so it will be necessary to touch up the paint every so often.

The final product is ready for some field testing.







Hope this helps someone.
-Klayton

Uniqueness is my weakness
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Joined: July 29th, 2003, 7:55 pm

October 10th, 2006, 8:42 pm #5

Though not an airgun, my recently purchased .223 coyote rifle needed to be painted in a camo pattern. Here is what I did to make a high desert camo paint job that sorta matches my camo clothing. The hardest part was taking abrand new rifle and scope set up, and performing the following steps (irreversible in most ways). Anywho here is what I did.


First I picked up the major colors I would need in Ultra Flat Camo Paint from the hardware store. $6 a can, but enough to do many many rifles, or other things.



I also was fortunate that my girlfriend is into scrapbooking, and has many differnt stencils lyin around. Picked a few out that I thought would work well.



Next is masking off that which you do not want to be covered in paint. For me, I covered the yardage and power markings, as well as making darn sure that the lenses were covered. I used 3M Professional masking tape.





Next is that hard part, after this step it is near impossible to go back, so BE ABSOLUTELY SURE you wish to paint your rifle at this point.
So now that it is masked up, use a scotch pad to scuff every surface you wish to paint, this ensures proper adhesion. Be sure to do a good job, as any smooth surfaces will be prone to flaking and chipping.





Next I hung the gun from a strap stud and cleaned all oil from the gun using a volitile solvent, so that it dries fast. After cleaning it do not touch the surface with bare fingers.
At this point you are ready to lay your base color. Here in the sesert we have a LOT of tan, so I used that as my base. Again, here work from a set of camo clothes that you know to work well in your area.
It is also important to take proper safety precautions. You will notice I am inside. Because of that i put a fan blowing air out of the garage, and used a professional, microm painters mask. These fumes are harmful, and proper ventilation is key, outside being best. If you do for any reason start to feel nausious, stop immediately and sit down away from the area. Get fresh air and if problems increase of persist, contact emergency care.



I painted the gun a base tan.



then using the stencils started layering the other colors.





Doont worry, you can always add layers of colors to achieve your desired effect. Once you are satisfied, it simply becomes the waiting game for it to dry. I reccommend at least 24 hours before any seriopus use. The nice thing is that you can alter the design by simply starting over at the masking stage. After time the paint will wear off in high use areas, so it will be necessary to touch up the paint every so often.

The final product is ready for some field testing.







Hope this helps someone.
-Klayton

Uniqueness is my weakness
....pretty courageous permanently painting new wood & metal like that! - HV
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Joined: May 8th, 2005, 8:32 pm

October 11th, 2006, 12:25 am #6

I need more dark shadows.

Hey whaddaya gonna do? There are no returns on firearms...lol.
It was an el-cheapo gun, and it is meant to be a beater walking around gun, so what the hey.

Uniqueness is my weakness
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