Delrin opposed to Nylon....whats the scoop?

Delrin opposed to Nylon....whats the scoop?

Joined: February 15th, 2006, 10:18 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 5:22 pm #1

Been doing a bit of research of the subject and I've seen both Delrin (acetal) and Nylon used for airgun purposes. Primarily I've seen derlin in use. I know they share alot of the same traits (self-lubricating, easy to machine etc..) Delrin is supposed to be better for threading purposes. And Nylon is supposed to be more moisture absorbant. I'm wondering why a machinist would choose one over the other. A prime example of this would be Talon Tunes using Delrin for Marauder baffles and extension but then using Nylon for a muzzle brake. I'm wondering what kind of jobs would call for one plastic over the other. Any insight on this fellas?

Semper Fi,
Derek
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 7:19 pm #2

...and costs more. Chemically, they're the same (acetal) polymer.

The usual reason a machinist might choose one over the other would availability in the shape, color, and size he wants.

Steve
Last edited by pneuguy on December 3rd, 2011, 7:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: February 15th, 2006, 10:18 pm

December 4th, 2011, 2:36 am #3

Derlin has that strength advantage. But I can really just use either or? Most of the nylon I found was cheaper in black...Still strikes me funny that Delrin is more expensive than steel in alot of cases.

Derek
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 4th, 2011, 3:42 am #4

...truth is, more often than not, the exact opposite is the case.

Steve
Last edited by pneuguy on December 4th, 2011, 3:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: February 15th, 2006, 10:18 pm

December 4th, 2011, 6:09 am #5

For many years I thought that PCP air tubes were made out of steel only because I couldn't imagine aluminum would hold up to the high pressures that they use. However after reading the various machining articles on Mr. Quackenbush's site I've learned that quiet a few mftrs use alum for that purpose and it works just fine. Is the manufacturing of plastics more plastics more complex than steel to make the price rise? I'm still learning that steel isn't always the best material for some of the parts I've been making. Prime example is I made a LDC adapter to screw into my Marauder shroud, after comparing it to a similar adapter made of alum it made more sense that I should just use aluminum for future projects as the reduction in weight was drastic. Also alum is cheaper, easier to machine, easier on my tool bits and just as effective as my steel counterpart. Although I have to admit my steel adapter looks pretty nice after a bath is some hot caustic bluing salts . Thanks again for the insight Steve. Out of the plastics is there one you prefer to use over the other for general use?

Derek
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

December 4th, 2011, 6:20 am #6

so dont listen to these edumacated types. (-;
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 4th, 2011, 2:50 pm #7

For many years I thought that PCP air tubes were made out of steel only because I couldn't imagine aluminum would hold up to the high pressures that they use. However after reading the various machining articles on Mr. Quackenbush's site I've learned that quiet a few mftrs use alum for that purpose and it works just fine. Is the manufacturing of plastics more plastics more complex than steel to make the price rise? I'm still learning that steel isn't always the best material for some of the parts I've been making. Prime example is I made a LDC adapter to screw into my Marauder shroud, after comparing it to a similar adapter made of alum it made more sense that I should just use aluminum for future projects as the reduction in weight was drastic. Also alum is cheaper, easier to machine, easier on my tool bits and just as effective as my steel counterpart. Although I have to admit my steel adapter looks pretty nice after a bath is some hot caustic bluing salts . Thanks again for the insight Steve. Out of the plastics is there one you prefer to use over the other for general use?

Derek
...about the properties of different materials. From dirt to Duralumin, cr@p to carbon fiber, sh!t to stainless steel, it seems they all have their uses.

Steve
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2010, 12:03 am

December 4th, 2011, 2:57 pm #8

Been doing a bit of research of the subject and I've seen both Delrin (acetal) and Nylon used for airgun purposes. Primarily I've seen derlin in use. I know they share alot of the same traits (self-lubricating, easy to machine etc..) Delrin is supposed to be better for threading purposes. And Nylon is supposed to be more moisture absorbant. I'm wondering why a machinist would choose one over the other. A prime example of this would be Talon Tunes using Delrin for Marauder baffles and extension but then using Nylon for a muzzle brake. I'm wondering what kind of jobs would call for one plastic over the other. Any insight on this fellas?

Semper Fi,
Derek
Nylon sucks to machine (soft and gummy). Delrin is much easier to machine and can hold consistent dimensions part after part with standard tooling. Nylon on the other hand is tough to machine and your tooling needs to be formed just right or you end up with fuzz and string as a result.

Just from my experience.
Rich
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: December 4th, 2005, 4:26 am

December 4th, 2011, 8:12 pm #9

Been doing a bit of research of the subject and I've seen both Delrin (acetal) and Nylon used for airgun purposes. Primarily I've seen derlin in use. I know they share alot of the same traits (self-lubricating, easy to machine etc..) Delrin is supposed to be better for threading purposes. And Nylon is supposed to be more moisture absorbant. I'm wondering why a machinist would choose one over the other. A prime example of this would be Talon Tunes using Delrin for Marauder baffles and extension but then using Nylon for a muzzle brake. I'm wondering what kind of jobs would call for one plastic over the other. Any insight on this fellas?

Semper Fi,
Derek
As with manufacturing anything slecting the proper material for the job is very important. The reason there are different plastics is because different plastics have differing characteristics such as heat tolerence, machineability, etc. As was pointed out in the thread about aluminum pump tubes, the working environment also plays an important role.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: December 29th, 2009, 3:08 pm

December 4th, 2011, 8:26 pm #10

For many years I thought that PCP air tubes were made out of steel only because I couldn't imagine aluminum would hold up to the high pressures that they use. However after reading the various machining articles on Mr. Quackenbush's site I've learned that quiet a few mftrs use alum for that purpose and it works just fine. Is the manufacturing of plastics more plastics more complex than steel to make the price rise? I'm still learning that steel isn't always the best material for some of the parts I've been making. Prime example is I made a LDC adapter to screw into my Marauder shroud, after comparing it to a similar adapter made of alum it made more sense that I should just use aluminum for future projects as the reduction in weight was drastic. Also alum is cheaper, easier to machine, easier on my tool bits and just as effective as my steel counterpart. Although I have to admit my steel adapter looks pretty nice after a bath is some hot caustic bluing salts . Thanks again for the insight Steve. Out of the plastics is there one you prefer to use over the other for general use?

Derek
Aluminium can perforate and corrode in a matter of hours, I've seen it happen. Take a 1500kg brand new aluminium climbing karabiner and leave it in sea water for a day! Ive been able to break one up by hand, like toffee in a week after being used on a R.I.B whilst diving.
Having said that, diving bottles can be made from aluminium, so I guess it depends on the alloy and the protective coating, anodising or plating ect.
I'm not a metallurgist but used to be a dive shop and service centre owner and I've seen Aluminium bottle 'fizzing' under water. From that point on I always prefered steel for my pressure vessels.

Now, you are planning to fill this to what working pressure?.....And hold it close to your face! Better get it right, that's all I have to say. If you buy a gun off the shelf made of a material that fails at least you can sue if you survive.
Reply
Like
Share