Crosman aluminum valve protection accidently discovered!

Crosman aluminum valve protection accidently discovered!

Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

April 23rd, 2012, 5:11 pm #1

Well, I do believe that I have stumbled upon something here.

A few months ago while thinking about ways other than annodizing to protect the valves in the Crosman made guns, an experiment was conducted on two rifles. One a 1377 based carbine, the other a Benji 392. Both contain aluminum. The 1377 has a complete aluminum valve, the Benji has just the inlet portion made of aluminum.

So, it is. A few months ago the parts were heated with a torch and then sprayed with Dupont Teflon Silicone spray inside and out. The parts were not totally cooled be the spray, but hit enough to ensure complete coverage. Parts were then put aside to cool and then wiped down.

Today the guns have been inspected. The parts are completely free of all the typical signs we see.

The guns have been used in a non-stop use manner.

Interestingly enough, the parts have a slippery nature to them, sort of like oilite bushings.

Thought to share so you guys can give it a try.



"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: December 14th, 2010, 5:08 am

April 23rd, 2012, 5:32 pm #2

is a few months enough time to see the typical damage of corrosion seen in neglected benjis with aluminum valves? i personally havent seen any damage to my 1377 valves and theyre about 2-3 years old now. the benji valves seem to be a different story though
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

April 23rd, 2012, 5:37 pm #3

...a few months, from new to a few months old, the valves displayed signs of torture. Then again, I shoot nearly everyday no less than 25 rounds. That's a lot of pumping and introduction of particulates into the valves, such as water, the main cause of the torture.

I will most certainly check later down the road too.

"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: February 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

April 23rd, 2012, 5:44 pm #4

Well, I do believe that I have stumbled upon something here.

A few months ago while thinking about ways other than annodizing to protect the valves in the Crosman made guns, an experiment was conducted on two rifles. One a 1377 based carbine, the other a Benji 392. Both contain aluminum. The 1377 has a complete aluminum valve, the Benji has just the inlet portion made of aluminum.

So, it is. A few months ago the parts were heated with a torch and then sprayed with Dupont Teflon Silicone spray inside and out. The parts were not totally cooled be the spray, but hit enough to ensure complete coverage. Parts were then put aside to cool and then wiped down.

Today the guns have been inspected. The parts are completely free of all the typical signs we see.

The guns have been used in a non-stop use manner.

Interestingly enough, the parts have a slippery nature to them, sort of like oilite bushings.

Thought to share so you guys can give it a try.



"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
I plink, therefore I am.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 6:52 pm

April 24th, 2012, 1:36 am #5

Well, I do believe that I have stumbled upon something here.

A few months ago while thinking about ways other than annodizing to protect the valves in the Crosman made guns, an experiment was conducted on two rifles. One a 1377 based carbine, the other a Benji 392. Both contain aluminum. The 1377 has a complete aluminum valve, the Benji has just the inlet portion made of aluminum.

So, it is. A few months ago the parts were heated with a torch and then sprayed with Dupont Teflon Silicone spray inside and out. The parts were not totally cooled be the spray, but hit enough to ensure complete coverage. Parts were then put aside to cool and then wiped down.

Today the guns have been inspected. The parts are completely free of all the typical signs we see.

The guns have been used in a non-stop use manner.

Interestingly enough, the parts have a slippery nature to them, sort of like oilite bushings.

Thought to share so you guys can give it a try.



"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
Moisture in the air is the problem. All that pumping is sucking in wet
air causing corrosion in the valves. Being that I live in the desert and
have zero moisture, none of my pumpers valves show any kind of rust or corrosion.
So it's a safe bet that location makes a big difference whether or not your valve rusts
or not.
Great experiment btw, I'm going to have to remember that one just in case I move to a
more humid location.




S.W.A.G. it!
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

April 24th, 2012, 4:24 am #6

Lived in Indiana and now Kentucky. Average elevation of 800ft, mid to moderate humidity range.

"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: February 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

April 25th, 2012, 1:37 am #7

Moisture in the air is the problem. All that pumping is sucking in wet
air causing corrosion in the valves. Being that I live in the desert and
have zero moisture, none of my pumpers valves show any kind of rust or corrosion.
So it's a safe bet that location makes a big difference whether or not your valve rusts
or not.
Great experiment btw, I'm going to have to remember that one just in case I move to a
more humid location.




S.W.A.G. it!
More than enough heat and humidity all summer and part of the fall.

The big Benji valve seems to have more trouble than the comparatively smaller Crosman valves.

I plink, therefore I am.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

April 25th, 2012, 1:52 am #8



"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
Reply
Like
Share

lhd
Joined: November 22nd, 2002, 10:41 pm

May 8th, 2012, 7:08 am #9

Well, I do believe that I have stumbled upon something here.

A few months ago while thinking about ways other than annodizing to protect the valves in the Crosman made guns, an experiment was conducted on two rifles. One a 1377 based carbine, the other a Benji 392. Both contain aluminum. The 1377 has a complete aluminum valve, the Benji has just the inlet portion made of aluminum.

So, it is. A few months ago the parts were heated with a torch and then sprayed with Dupont Teflon Silicone spray inside and out. The parts were not totally cooled be the spray, but hit enough to ensure complete coverage. Parts were then put aside to cool and then wiped down.

Today the guns have been inspected. The parts are completely free of all the typical signs we see.

The guns have been used in a non-stop use manner.

Interestingly enough, the parts have a slippery nature to them, sort of like oilite bushings.

Thought to share so you guys can give it a try.



"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
For/by the military, and its still used even nowadays. Alodine powder or liquid can be used to coat aluminum and provide an extremely corrosion resistant surface. It was usually used as a primer, but it works on its own, and need not be painted.

My first Field Target rifle prototype was coated internally with Alodine liquid to avoid corrosion, since my home-built guns were not anodized.

It IS poisonous however, so care must be taken when handling it.
Reply
Like
Share