Co2 operation

Co2 operation

Joined: January 16th, 2006, 1:17 am

December 22nd, 2011, 7:24 am #1

Hey guys trying to find out some info on c02 pressure. Since the hot outside temperature increases co2 pressure, is there a point at which in cold weather the gun will just stop operating? I mean no pressure at all?... I'm not going to be shooting in Antarctica or anything, but would be interested to know if the gun will stop operating...excluding factors such as a frozen bolt handle that won't move and etc. Im talking about just co2 and the cold air.....
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

December 22nd, 2011, 3:08 pm #2

not in normally encountered tempatures..I know the function is negatively affected at about below 60f, and works exceedingly well at 100f, and normal values of 850 psi are about 72 f iirc..... but i havent heard of a fresh co2 not working when its cold.
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Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 22nd, 2011, 3:55 pm #3

Hey guys trying to find out some info on c02 pressure. Since the hot outside temperature increases co2 pressure, is there a point at which in cold weather the gun will just stop operating? I mean no pressure at all?... I'm not going to be shooting in Antarctica or anything, but would be interested to know if the gun will stop operating...excluding factors such as a frozen bolt handle that won't move and etc. Im talking about just co2 and the cold air.....
...becoming "dry" ice. But practically speaking (like to seriously answer your question), CO2 is a lot more tolerant of low temperatures (even below the freezing point of water) than most folks realize. You just have to tune for it.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/79537/me ... 3fps+stdev

Steve
Last edited by pneuguy on December 22nd, 2011, 3:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

December 22nd, 2011, 3:58 pm #4

ive played with liquid nitrogen , ex girlfriend was a chemist.(and now a med student) what is the temp of liquid nitrogen for comparison.?
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Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 22nd, 2011, 4:02 pm #5

Frosty, man. Frosty.

Steve
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

December 22nd, 2011, 4:09 pm #6

thats really cold, hard to comprehend almost...isnt absolute zero -456?
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

December 22nd, 2011, 4:17 pm #7

oops good says 459.67nt
Last edited by robnewyork on December 22nd, 2011, 4:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 22nd, 2011, 4:25 pm #8

thats really cold, hard to comprehend almost...isnt absolute zero -456?
...the other is the absence of heat. That analogy suggests that, because something as cold as boiling LN2 has only about 1/4 the heat energy as something at room temperature, it's a little like air pressure at an altitude of 35,000 feet (i.e., where jets carry millions of passengers every day).

Neither is anything a naked human being can survive for more than a few seconds - but still a long way from absolute zero.

Steve
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

December 22nd, 2011, 4:27 pm #9

as an sr71 pilot in the 70s . (-:
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Joined: November 28th, 2002, 6:26 pm

December 22nd, 2011, 4:31 pm #10

...at altitudes pushing 100,000'. Air pressure up there is closer to only 1/50th of sea level - a prettygood approximation to outer space!

Steve
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