California Farm Pest Hunt 8/11/11: Steroids Found on the Farm!!! - PICS

California Farm Pest Hunt 8/11/11: Steroids Found on the Farm!!! - PICS

Joined: November 5th, 2003, 8:29 pm

August 12th, 2011, 5:58 pm #1

It's been a while since the last farm pest hunt as life has gotten in the way, lol, and other priorities have taken precedence over shooting airguns as much as I used to...

After some miscommunications and delayed email checks, found out yesterday morning around 10 am that it was the day to get back in the field!!! :-0 It's quite cool outside and no expectation of it warming up with lots of cloud cover looking across the San Francisco Bay, just isn't "feelin" like its conditions for lots of critter activity but hey, that saying about "The worst day of hunting is better than the greatest day at work" applies!!! Plus our friend Robert Hamilton can't have all he fun pest hunting!!!

So I slam my coffee, tell my daughter to get her gear together(warm clothes, Iphone, snacks, dvds, etc. to keep her busy if she isn't up for walking around or hanging out in the blind). After a short bit, my dogs are barking and my good hunting and shooting buddy Doug Owen is outside and we're loading up my van to start our trek to the farm.

As were driving down the highway and talking up a good storm, some things just never change when hanging out with Doug, we pull off the highway to grab a bite at Carl's Junior before making the last leg of our journey to the farm. It's funny, we're really taking our time getting there, no hurry and no worry, more like just hanging out with a good bud and my daughter and looking at it like we get there when we get there, the pests aren't on a schedule, plus with the way the weather is, hopefully the clouds will burn off and temps will heat up a bit to increase the potential for ground squirrel activity above ground!

Pulling into the farm, the driveway isn't packed with pest birds like in hunts past, pretty bare but this year has been that way from what Doug has told me. But at the end of the hay barn, there are some big black birds that Doug's keen eyes pick out fast and he says pull up and park at this end of the barn and go get em!

I quietly walk to the back of the van and grab my Steroided 392, give it 2 additional pumps(2 storage pumps already) and chamber a 15.9gr exact and slip into the open sided hay barn. Slowly eating up the 50 yards as covertly as I can to not disturb the crows, maybe 8 of them, I'm about to reach the 20' high stack of haybales that I want to shoot from the left side of at the group of 8.

I'm about 8 feet from making it to the corner then out of the corner of my right eye, I see to the left side of the haybale stack, is about 30 yards off is a crow and he sees me, "CAW CAW CAW CAW!!!!!

He takes flight toward the group of 8 which stirs them into a max exodus of cackling mayhem!!! That didn't go as planned, lol, but it sure was a rush!!! Start motioning over to the right side of the haybales to go to the hide and peek around the Almond Trough and sit on a hay bale to scan. Well hello, 2 bushy butts on the edge of the trough, one eating and another proudly sun tanning on a rock at about 15 yards! Easy chip shot, line his shoulder up, safety off, clip, FWAP, smack the rock to the right of him!!! :-0 The 2 scurry into the Almond Trough and I'm saying "what just happened, lol, could I of pulled it that bad?!?!"

With the excitement over, time to get back to the van and pull it up by the blind and unload and explain "What Didn't Happen, lol"!!!

So, we're hanging out and its cool, Leila decides to hang out in the van and talk with her friend that she's heading up to the mountains with for the weekend on the phone while Doug and me play. Here comes Mr. pidgeon who lands near the manure separator about 20 yards away, Doug gives me the nod and I line it up, break the shot, big puff of feathers, he takes flight above the separator then starts losing altitude into/just behind the separator, not gonna give much effort finding him!

Its a slow hunt so I set up a target board at 23yds. to see where my Steroided 392 is at and much to my surprise its around 3.5 - 4" right! A few clicks later and its on.

I go to pull my R7 out of its case and realize I had put another scope on it, in preparation of some R7 challenges in the near future with a fellow airgunning bud lol, and had to sight it in. Good thing I set up that target! After giving it a ton of elevation, it was finally on, note to self, change to droop mounts when ya get home...

One thing is evident, there are more collared doves that imaginable, don't know if they are keeping the pest birds away or if they know they aren't in season but there's prolly a hundred or more bouncing around us and the farm. Can't wait for them to be "in season"!!!

It's starting to pick up after about an hour, a pidgeon makes himself available and Doug is on it with his MROD(.22), click, ting, smack!!! Another pidgeon arrives and I grab the Steroided 392 and feel good knowing its on, especially with how the wind is picking up. 25 yard shot, adjust the Centerpoint 4 - 16 x 40AO IR MD for the range, set on 8x and break the shot, bird drops like a rock!







One thing that is surprising me, in field conditions, at 5 - 6 pumps, the Steroided 392 isn't loud at all. It's not mousefart like Doug's MROD or Rich in Mich Shrouded RWS850(.22) on C02 but I'm getting more and more impressed with it for field use with its self contained power plant that is capable of some big league muzzle energy, lack of recoil/hold sensitivity, durability and accuracy.

The blackbirds and starlings are starting to show up and Doug is on them. Here's a pic of Doug in the hide and a starling on the left, female blackbird on the right:









Another variant of blackbird that we get in northern/coastal California is the red shouldered:





After a few more hours of knocking down the pest bird population and hanging out, it was time to head back home. It was a fine day in the field, especially considering how off the cuff it was, lol. Next go round will be more organized and I'll bring my daughter's rifles for her to shoot. Will probably bring my Steroided Silver Streak as well! Til next time...

Regards,

Tony
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Joined: January 13th, 2006, 11:52 pm

August 12th, 2011, 6:43 pm #2

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Last edited by BSJI on August 12th, 2011, 6:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 5th, 2003, 8:29 pm

August 12th, 2011, 9:45 pm #3






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Joined: December 29th, 2009, 3:08 pm

August 12th, 2011, 10:23 pm #4

It's been a while since the last farm pest hunt as life has gotten in the way, lol, and other priorities have taken precedence over shooting airguns as much as I used to...

After some miscommunications and delayed email checks, found out yesterday morning around 10 am that it was the day to get back in the field!!! :-0 It's quite cool outside and no expectation of it warming up with lots of cloud cover looking across the San Francisco Bay, just isn't "feelin" like its conditions for lots of critter activity but hey, that saying about "The worst day of hunting is better than the greatest day at work" applies!!! Plus our friend Robert Hamilton can't have all he fun pest hunting!!!

So I slam my coffee, tell my daughter to get her gear together(warm clothes, Iphone, snacks, dvds, etc. to keep her busy if she isn't up for walking around or hanging out in the blind). After a short bit, my dogs are barking and my good hunting and shooting buddy Doug Owen is outside and we're loading up my van to start our trek to the farm.

As were driving down the highway and talking up a good storm, some things just never change when hanging out with Doug, we pull off the highway to grab a bite at Carl's Junior before making the last leg of our journey to the farm. It's funny, we're really taking our time getting there, no hurry and no worry, more like just hanging out with a good bud and my daughter and looking at it like we get there when we get there, the pests aren't on a schedule, plus with the way the weather is, hopefully the clouds will burn off and temps will heat up a bit to increase the potential for ground squirrel activity above ground!

Pulling into the farm, the driveway isn't packed with pest birds like in hunts past, pretty bare but this year has been that way from what Doug has told me. But at the end of the hay barn, there are some big black birds that Doug's keen eyes pick out fast and he says pull up and park at this end of the barn and go get em!

I quietly walk to the back of the van and grab my Steroided 392, give it 2 additional pumps(2 storage pumps already) and chamber a 15.9gr exact and slip into the open sided hay barn. Slowly eating up the 50 yards as covertly as I can to not disturb the crows, maybe 8 of them, I'm about to reach the 20' high stack of haybales that I want to shoot from the left side of at the group of 8.

I'm about 8 feet from making it to the corner then out of the corner of my right eye, I see to the left side of the haybale stack, is about 30 yards off is a crow and he sees me, "CAW CAW CAW CAW!!!!!

He takes flight toward the group of 8 which stirs them into a max exodus of cackling mayhem!!! That didn't go as planned, lol, but it sure was a rush!!! Start motioning over to the right side of the haybales to go to the hide and peek around the Almond Trough and sit on a hay bale to scan. Well hello, 2 bushy butts on the edge of the trough, one eating and another proudly sun tanning on a rock at about 15 yards! Easy chip shot, line his shoulder up, safety off, clip, FWAP, smack the rock to the right of him!!! :-0 The 2 scurry into the Almond Trough and I'm saying "what just happened, lol, could I of pulled it that bad?!?!"

With the excitement over, time to get back to the van and pull it up by the blind and unload and explain "What Didn't Happen, lol"!!!

So, we're hanging out and its cool, Leila decides to hang out in the van and talk with her friend that she's heading up to the mountains with for the weekend on the phone while Doug and me play. Here comes Mr. pidgeon who lands near the manure separator about 20 yards away, Doug gives me the nod and I line it up, break the shot, big puff of feathers, he takes flight above the separator then starts losing altitude into/just behind the separator, not gonna give much effort finding him!

Its a slow hunt so I set up a target board at 23yds. to see where my Steroided 392 is at and much to my surprise its around 3.5 - 4" right! A few clicks later and its on.

I go to pull my R7 out of its case and realize I had put another scope on it, in preparation of some R7 challenges in the near future with a fellow airgunning bud lol, and had to sight it in. Good thing I set up that target! After giving it a ton of elevation, it was finally on, note to self, change to droop mounts when ya get home...

One thing is evident, there are more collared doves that imaginable, don't know if they are keeping the pest birds away or if they know they aren't in season but there's prolly a hundred or more bouncing around us and the farm. Can't wait for them to be "in season"!!!

It's starting to pick up after about an hour, a pidgeon makes himself available and Doug is on it with his MROD(.22), click, ting, smack!!! Another pidgeon arrives and I grab the Steroided 392 and feel good knowing its on, especially with how the wind is picking up. 25 yard shot, adjust the Centerpoint 4 - 16 x 40AO IR MD for the range, set on 8x and break the shot, bird drops like a rock!







One thing that is surprising me, in field conditions, at 5 - 6 pumps, the Steroided 392 isn't loud at all. It's not mousefart like Doug's MROD or Rich in Mich Shrouded RWS850(.22) on C02 but I'm getting more and more impressed with it for field use with its self contained power plant that is capable of some big league muzzle energy, lack of recoil/hold sensitivity, durability and accuracy.

The blackbirds and starlings are starting to show up and Doug is on them. Here's a pic of Doug in the hide and a starling on the left, female blackbird on the right:









Another variant of blackbird that we get in northern/coastal California is the red shouldered:





After a few more hours of knocking down the pest bird population and hanging out, it was time to head back home. It was a fine day in the field, especially considering how off the cuff it was, lol. Next go round will be more organized and I'll bring my daughter's rifles for her to shoot. Will probably bring my Steroided Silver Streak as well! Til next time...

Regards,

Tony
except maybe the pigeon. Starlings are threatened and in decline globaly. You should stick to shooting rats that way nobody gets offended!
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Joined: December 29th, 2009, 3:08 pm

August 12th, 2011, 10:26 pm #5

It's been a while since the last farm pest hunt as life has gotten in the way, lol, and other priorities have taken precedence over shooting airguns as much as I used to...

After some miscommunications and delayed email checks, found out yesterday morning around 10 am that it was the day to get back in the field!!! :-0 It's quite cool outside and no expectation of it warming up with lots of cloud cover looking across the San Francisco Bay, just isn't "feelin" like its conditions for lots of critter activity but hey, that saying about "The worst day of hunting is better than the greatest day at work" applies!!! Plus our friend Robert Hamilton can't have all he fun pest hunting!!!

So I slam my coffee, tell my daughter to get her gear together(warm clothes, Iphone, snacks, dvds, etc. to keep her busy if she isn't up for walking around or hanging out in the blind). After a short bit, my dogs are barking and my good hunting and shooting buddy Doug Owen is outside and we're loading up my van to start our trek to the farm.

As were driving down the highway and talking up a good storm, some things just never change when hanging out with Doug, we pull off the highway to grab a bite at Carl's Junior before making the last leg of our journey to the farm. It's funny, we're really taking our time getting there, no hurry and no worry, more like just hanging out with a good bud and my daughter and looking at it like we get there when we get there, the pests aren't on a schedule, plus with the way the weather is, hopefully the clouds will burn off and temps will heat up a bit to increase the potential for ground squirrel activity above ground!

Pulling into the farm, the driveway isn't packed with pest birds like in hunts past, pretty bare but this year has been that way from what Doug has told me. But at the end of the hay barn, there are some big black birds that Doug's keen eyes pick out fast and he says pull up and park at this end of the barn and go get em!

I quietly walk to the back of the van and grab my Steroided 392, give it 2 additional pumps(2 storage pumps already) and chamber a 15.9gr exact and slip into the open sided hay barn. Slowly eating up the 50 yards as covertly as I can to not disturb the crows, maybe 8 of them, I'm about to reach the 20' high stack of haybales that I want to shoot from the left side of at the group of 8.

I'm about 8 feet from making it to the corner then out of the corner of my right eye, I see to the left side of the haybale stack, is about 30 yards off is a crow and he sees me, "CAW CAW CAW CAW!!!!!

He takes flight toward the group of 8 which stirs them into a max exodus of cackling mayhem!!! That didn't go as planned, lol, but it sure was a rush!!! Start motioning over to the right side of the haybales to go to the hide and peek around the Almond Trough and sit on a hay bale to scan. Well hello, 2 bushy butts on the edge of the trough, one eating and another proudly sun tanning on a rock at about 15 yards! Easy chip shot, line his shoulder up, safety off, clip, FWAP, smack the rock to the right of him!!! :-0 The 2 scurry into the Almond Trough and I'm saying "what just happened, lol, could I of pulled it that bad?!?!"

With the excitement over, time to get back to the van and pull it up by the blind and unload and explain "What Didn't Happen, lol"!!!

So, we're hanging out and its cool, Leila decides to hang out in the van and talk with her friend that she's heading up to the mountains with for the weekend on the phone while Doug and me play. Here comes Mr. pidgeon who lands near the manure separator about 20 yards away, Doug gives me the nod and I line it up, break the shot, big puff of feathers, he takes flight above the separator then starts losing altitude into/just behind the separator, not gonna give much effort finding him!

Its a slow hunt so I set up a target board at 23yds. to see where my Steroided 392 is at and much to my surprise its around 3.5 - 4" right! A few clicks later and its on.

I go to pull my R7 out of its case and realize I had put another scope on it, in preparation of some R7 challenges in the near future with a fellow airgunning bud lol, and had to sight it in. Good thing I set up that target! After giving it a ton of elevation, it was finally on, note to self, change to droop mounts when ya get home...

One thing is evident, there are more collared doves that imaginable, don't know if they are keeping the pest birds away or if they know they aren't in season but there's prolly a hundred or more bouncing around us and the farm. Can't wait for them to be "in season"!!!

It's starting to pick up after about an hour, a pidgeon makes himself available and Doug is on it with his MROD(.22), click, ting, smack!!! Another pidgeon arrives and I grab the Steroided 392 and feel good knowing its on, especially with how the wind is picking up. 25 yard shot, adjust the Centerpoint 4 - 16 x 40AO IR MD for the range, set on 8x and break the shot, bird drops like a rock!







One thing that is surprising me, in field conditions, at 5 - 6 pumps, the Steroided 392 isn't loud at all. It's not mousefart like Doug's MROD or Rich in Mich Shrouded RWS850(.22) on C02 but I'm getting more and more impressed with it for field use with its self contained power plant that is capable of some big league muzzle energy, lack of recoil/hold sensitivity, durability and accuracy.

The blackbirds and starlings are starting to show up and Doug is on them. Here's a pic of Doug in the hide and a starling on the left, female blackbird on the right:









Another variant of blackbird that we get in northern/coastal California is the red shouldered:





After a few more hours of knocking down the pest bird population and hanging out, it was time to head back home. It was a fine day in the field, especially considering how off the cuff it was, lol. Next go round will be more organized and I'll bring my daughter's rifles for her to shoot. Will probably bring my Steroided Silver Streak as well! Til next time...

Regards,

Tony
This stuff would be better received in the Crosman Forum Field & Hunting
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Joined: September 16th, 2008, 10:17 pm

August 12th, 2011, 11:21 pm #6

It's been a while since the last farm pest hunt as life has gotten in the way, lol, and other priorities have taken precedence over shooting airguns as much as I used to...

After some miscommunications and delayed email checks, found out yesterday morning around 10 am that it was the day to get back in the field!!! :-0 It's quite cool outside and no expectation of it warming up with lots of cloud cover looking across the San Francisco Bay, just isn't "feelin" like its conditions for lots of critter activity but hey, that saying about "The worst day of hunting is better than the greatest day at work" applies!!! Plus our friend Robert Hamilton can't have all he fun pest hunting!!!

So I slam my coffee, tell my daughter to get her gear together(warm clothes, Iphone, snacks, dvds, etc. to keep her busy if she isn't up for walking around or hanging out in the blind). After a short bit, my dogs are barking and my good hunting and shooting buddy Doug Owen is outside and we're loading up my van to start our trek to the farm.

As were driving down the highway and talking up a good storm, some things just never change when hanging out with Doug, we pull off the highway to grab a bite at Carl's Junior before making the last leg of our journey to the farm. It's funny, we're really taking our time getting there, no hurry and no worry, more like just hanging out with a good bud and my daughter and looking at it like we get there when we get there, the pests aren't on a schedule, plus with the way the weather is, hopefully the clouds will burn off and temps will heat up a bit to increase the potential for ground squirrel activity above ground!

Pulling into the farm, the driveway isn't packed with pest birds like in hunts past, pretty bare but this year has been that way from what Doug has told me. But at the end of the hay barn, there are some big black birds that Doug's keen eyes pick out fast and he says pull up and park at this end of the barn and go get em!

I quietly walk to the back of the van and grab my Steroided 392, give it 2 additional pumps(2 storage pumps already) and chamber a 15.9gr exact and slip into the open sided hay barn. Slowly eating up the 50 yards as covertly as I can to not disturb the crows, maybe 8 of them, I'm about to reach the 20' high stack of haybales that I want to shoot from the left side of at the group of 8.

I'm about 8 feet from making it to the corner then out of the corner of my right eye, I see to the left side of the haybale stack, is about 30 yards off is a crow and he sees me, "CAW CAW CAW CAW!!!!!

He takes flight toward the group of 8 which stirs them into a max exodus of cackling mayhem!!! That didn't go as planned, lol, but it sure was a rush!!! Start motioning over to the right side of the haybales to go to the hide and peek around the Almond Trough and sit on a hay bale to scan. Well hello, 2 bushy butts on the edge of the trough, one eating and another proudly sun tanning on a rock at about 15 yards! Easy chip shot, line his shoulder up, safety off, clip, FWAP, smack the rock to the right of him!!! :-0 The 2 scurry into the Almond Trough and I'm saying "what just happened, lol, could I of pulled it that bad?!?!"

With the excitement over, time to get back to the van and pull it up by the blind and unload and explain "What Didn't Happen, lol"!!!

So, we're hanging out and its cool, Leila decides to hang out in the van and talk with her friend that she's heading up to the mountains with for the weekend on the phone while Doug and me play. Here comes Mr. pidgeon who lands near the manure separator about 20 yards away, Doug gives me the nod and I line it up, break the shot, big puff of feathers, he takes flight above the separator then starts losing altitude into/just behind the separator, not gonna give much effort finding him!

Its a slow hunt so I set up a target board at 23yds. to see where my Steroided 392 is at and much to my surprise its around 3.5 - 4" right! A few clicks later and its on.

I go to pull my R7 out of its case and realize I had put another scope on it, in preparation of some R7 challenges in the near future with a fellow airgunning bud lol, and had to sight it in. Good thing I set up that target! After giving it a ton of elevation, it was finally on, note to self, change to droop mounts when ya get home...

One thing is evident, there are more collared doves that imaginable, don't know if they are keeping the pest birds away or if they know they aren't in season but there's prolly a hundred or more bouncing around us and the farm. Can't wait for them to be "in season"!!!

It's starting to pick up after about an hour, a pidgeon makes himself available and Doug is on it with his MROD(.22), click, ting, smack!!! Another pidgeon arrives and I grab the Steroided 392 and feel good knowing its on, especially with how the wind is picking up. 25 yard shot, adjust the Centerpoint 4 - 16 x 40AO IR MD for the range, set on 8x and break the shot, bird drops like a rock!







One thing that is surprising me, in field conditions, at 5 - 6 pumps, the Steroided 392 isn't loud at all. It's not mousefart like Doug's MROD or Rich in Mich Shrouded RWS850(.22) on C02 but I'm getting more and more impressed with it for field use with its self contained power plant that is capable of some big league muzzle energy, lack of recoil/hold sensitivity, durability and accuracy.

The blackbirds and starlings are starting to show up and Doug is on them. Here's a pic of Doug in the hide and a starling on the left, female blackbird on the right:









Another variant of blackbird that we get in northern/coastal California is the red shouldered:





After a few more hours of knocking down the pest bird population and hanging out, it was time to head back home. It was a fine day in the field, especially considering how off the cuff it was, lol. Next go round will be more organized and I'll bring my daughter's rifles for her to shoot. Will probably bring my Steroided Silver Streak as well! Til next time...

Regards,

Tony
Great post - thanks! nt.
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Joined: August 3rd, 2008, 2:29 pm

August 12th, 2011, 11:21 pm #7

It's been a while since the last farm pest hunt as life has gotten in the way, lol, and other priorities have taken precedence over shooting airguns as much as I used to...

After some miscommunications and delayed email checks, found out yesterday morning around 10 am that it was the day to get back in the field!!! :-0 It's quite cool outside and no expectation of it warming up with lots of cloud cover looking across the San Francisco Bay, just isn't "feelin" like its conditions for lots of critter activity but hey, that saying about "The worst day of hunting is better than the greatest day at work" applies!!! Plus our friend Robert Hamilton can't have all he fun pest hunting!!!

So I slam my coffee, tell my daughter to get her gear together(warm clothes, Iphone, snacks, dvds, etc. to keep her busy if she isn't up for walking around or hanging out in the blind). After a short bit, my dogs are barking and my good hunting and shooting buddy Doug Owen is outside and we're loading up my van to start our trek to the farm.

As were driving down the highway and talking up a good storm, some things just never change when hanging out with Doug, we pull off the highway to grab a bite at Carl's Junior before making the last leg of our journey to the farm. It's funny, we're really taking our time getting there, no hurry and no worry, more like just hanging out with a good bud and my daughter and looking at it like we get there when we get there, the pests aren't on a schedule, plus with the way the weather is, hopefully the clouds will burn off and temps will heat up a bit to increase the potential for ground squirrel activity above ground!

Pulling into the farm, the driveway isn't packed with pest birds like in hunts past, pretty bare but this year has been that way from what Doug has told me. But at the end of the hay barn, there are some big black birds that Doug's keen eyes pick out fast and he says pull up and park at this end of the barn and go get em!

I quietly walk to the back of the van and grab my Steroided 392, give it 2 additional pumps(2 storage pumps already) and chamber a 15.9gr exact and slip into the open sided hay barn. Slowly eating up the 50 yards as covertly as I can to not disturb the crows, maybe 8 of them, I'm about to reach the 20' high stack of haybales that I want to shoot from the left side of at the group of 8.

I'm about 8 feet from making it to the corner then out of the corner of my right eye, I see to the left side of the haybale stack, is about 30 yards off is a crow and he sees me, "CAW CAW CAW CAW!!!!!

He takes flight toward the group of 8 which stirs them into a max exodus of cackling mayhem!!! That didn't go as planned, lol, but it sure was a rush!!! Start motioning over to the right side of the haybales to go to the hide and peek around the Almond Trough and sit on a hay bale to scan. Well hello, 2 bushy butts on the edge of the trough, one eating and another proudly sun tanning on a rock at about 15 yards! Easy chip shot, line his shoulder up, safety off, clip, FWAP, smack the rock to the right of him!!! :-0 The 2 scurry into the Almond Trough and I'm saying "what just happened, lol, could I of pulled it that bad?!?!"

With the excitement over, time to get back to the van and pull it up by the blind and unload and explain "What Didn't Happen, lol"!!!

So, we're hanging out and its cool, Leila decides to hang out in the van and talk with her friend that she's heading up to the mountains with for the weekend on the phone while Doug and me play. Here comes Mr. pidgeon who lands near the manure separator about 20 yards away, Doug gives me the nod and I line it up, break the shot, big puff of feathers, he takes flight above the separator then starts losing altitude into/just behind the separator, not gonna give much effort finding him!

Its a slow hunt so I set up a target board at 23yds. to see where my Steroided 392 is at and much to my surprise its around 3.5 - 4" right! A few clicks later and its on.

I go to pull my R7 out of its case and realize I had put another scope on it, in preparation of some R7 challenges in the near future with a fellow airgunning bud lol, and had to sight it in. Good thing I set up that target! After giving it a ton of elevation, it was finally on, note to self, change to droop mounts when ya get home...

One thing is evident, there are more collared doves that imaginable, don't know if they are keeping the pest birds away or if they know they aren't in season but there's prolly a hundred or more bouncing around us and the farm. Can't wait for them to be "in season"!!!

It's starting to pick up after about an hour, a pidgeon makes himself available and Doug is on it with his MROD(.22), click, ting, smack!!! Another pidgeon arrives and I grab the Steroided 392 and feel good knowing its on, especially with how the wind is picking up. 25 yard shot, adjust the Centerpoint 4 - 16 x 40AO IR MD for the range, set on 8x and break the shot, bird drops like a rock!







One thing that is surprising me, in field conditions, at 5 - 6 pumps, the Steroided 392 isn't loud at all. It's not mousefart like Doug's MROD or Rich in Mich Shrouded RWS850(.22) on C02 but I'm getting more and more impressed with it for field use with its self contained power plant that is capable of some big league muzzle energy, lack of recoil/hold sensitivity, durability and accuracy.

The blackbirds and starlings are starting to show up and Doug is on them. Here's a pic of Doug in the hide and a starling on the left, female blackbird on the right:









Another variant of blackbird that we get in northern/coastal California is the red shouldered:





After a few more hours of knocking down the pest bird population and hanging out, it was time to head back home. It was a fine day in the field, especially considering how off the cuff it was, lol. Next go round will be more organized and I'll bring my daughter's rifles for her to shoot. Will probably bring my Steroided Silver Streak as well! Til next time...

Regards,

Tony
one question --- how is it to work the bolt like that with a scope ? sweet shooter also --- tim may get my C9 in the near future .

TOO many freaks and NOT enough circuses
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Joined: September 26th, 2003, 2:20 am

August 13th, 2011, 4:42 pm #8

except maybe the pigeon. Starlings are threatened and in decline globaly. You should stick to shooting rats that way nobody gets offended!
You bet they are. Every time they invade my yard. They along with the weaver finch are recognized aggressive invader species in the US, and have contributed greatly to the decline of native bird populations. I make it a point to shoot every one I can, and as a result in the past 4 years I have seen a significant increase in the number and variation of native species that come to the bird feeders.
You evidently have no idea what a pest species really is. Blackbirds and crows settle on farms in huge numbers and can devastate a crop field in a matter of hours. Pretty much all birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Act except starlings and weaver finches. However, each state also has its own regulations that allow for pest removal and protection from crop depradation.

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Joined: November 5th, 2003, 8:29 pm

August 13th, 2011, 9:14 pm #9

except maybe the pigeon. Starlings are threatened and in decline globaly. You should stick to shooting rats that way nobody gets offended!
rats. They, along with ground squirrels tremendously affect their operational costs, thus decreasing their profits AND Increasing retail prices of goods like milk, cheese and other dairy products.

Fish and Game allows the dispatching of pests, that are normally considered protected like crows under Farm Depradation circumstances. If one is willing to jump through all the hoops, one can even get a permit to dispatch sea gulls on farms adversely affected by their presence, I know this because we had to look into the process as one of the largest cattle owners west of Montana wanted us to add seagulls to the list of what we are to dispatch BUT its a lengthy, multistep/approval process that costs some money so we passed.

Regards,

Tony
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Joined: November 5th, 2003, 8:29 pm

August 13th, 2011, 9:16 pm #10

You bet they are. Every time they invade my yard. They along with the weaver finch are recognized aggressive invader species in the US, and have contributed greatly to the decline of native bird populations. I make it a point to shoot every one I can, and as a result in the past 4 years I have seen a significant increase in the number and variation of native species that come to the bird feeders.
You evidently have no idea what a pest species really is. Blackbirds and crows settle on farms in huge numbers and can devastate a crop field in a matter of hours. Pretty much all birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Act except starlings and weaver finches. However, each state also has its own regulations that allow for pest removal and protection from crop depradation.

causes decline in local bird populations. I've never heard of any U.S. Fish and Game Agency saying to "not dispatch them!!!"

Regards,

Tony
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