A tip for repairing those plastic Crosman rifle stocks.....

A tip for repairing those plastic Crosman rifle stocks.....

Joined: November 15th, 2002, 3:25 am

June 3rd, 2011, 11:44 pm #1

This stock happens to be for a Crosman 766 American Classic, but there are a number of Crosman rifles that utilize the same mounting technique. The support ears that give the stock lateral stability can break if mishandled, and bumped hard enough. Often, folks just put up with the resultant wobbly stock, or they seek out a good replacement stock to replace the broken one. The broken piece is usually held within the clam shell of the receiver, so some folks have tried gluing the piece back to the stock, but this usually doesn't hold up very well, and soon breaks again.

This is a little trick that I have been using for years - it is a simple repair, but seems to hold up quite well.

In the following three pics, the red circles show where the outer portion of the ear has already been cyano-glued back into place. The broken edges of the plastic are prepared by cleaning the faces with denatured alcohol, or some other similar, plastic safe degreaser. The cyano-glue is then applied, and the broken piece placed back into position.



Once the glue dries, a small needle file is used to form a small groove around the outer periphery of the mounting ear. A small (1/16" dia.) hole is drilled at the rear of the mounting ear, from top to bottom. The surface of the plastic is then roughed up with some course grit sandpaper.



The next step is to obtain some small gauge steel wire - about 22 or 24 guage - and loop it through the hole, and twist the wire together firmly, snip off the excess, and fold the tag down flat. I used a heavy-duty garbage bag twist tie, stripped the paper covering off it, and folded it in half, to give me two wires, side by side to reinforce the mounting ear.



The final step is to add a good epoxy cement, such as JB Weld, over the repaired area. This is primarily to maintain the wire in position, but also adds a bit of extra strength to the overall repair.
Viola' - good as new.


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Joined: January 29th, 2002, 1:26 pm

June 4th, 2011, 1:51 am #2

I like this idea! Sometimes a layer of electrical tape between the stock and rear of the receiver firms up the fit. Dave
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Joined: February 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

June 4th, 2011, 1:20 pm #3

This stock happens to be for a Crosman 766 American Classic, but there are a number of Crosman rifles that utilize the same mounting technique. The support ears that give the stock lateral stability can break if mishandled, and bumped hard enough. Often, folks just put up with the resultant wobbly stock, or they seek out a good replacement stock to replace the broken one. The broken piece is usually held within the clam shell of the receiver, so some folks have tried gluing the piece back to the stock, but this usually doesn't hold up very well, and soon breaks again.

This is a little trick that I have been using for years - it is a simple repair, but seems to hold up quite well.

In the following three pics, the red circles show where the outer portion of the ear has already been cyano-glued back into place. The broken edges of the plastic are prepared by cleaning the faces with denatured alcohol, or some other similar, plastic safe degreaser. The cyano-glue is then applied, and the broken piece placed back into position.



Once the glue dries, a small needle file is used to form a small groove around the outer periphery of the mounting ear. A small (1/16" dia.) hole is drilled at the rear of the mounting ear, from top to bottom. The surface of the plastic is then roughed up with some course grit sandpaper.



The next step is to obtain some small gauge steel wire - about 22 or 24 guage - and loop it through the hole, and twist the wire together firmly, snip off the excess, and fold the tag down flat. I used a heavy-duty garbage bag twist tie, stripped the paper covering off it, and folded it in half, to give me two wires, side by side to reinforce the mounting ear.



The final step is to add a good epoxy cement, such as JB Weld, over the repaired area. This is primarily to maintain the wire in position, but also adds a bit of extra strength to the overall repair.
Viola' - good as new.

I plink, therefore I am.
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Joined: October 7th, 2002, 6:38 pm

June 13th, 2011, 8:19 am #4

This stock happens to be for a Crosman 766 American Classic, but there are a number of Crosman rifles that utilize the same mounting technique. The support ears that give the stock lateral stability can break if mishandled, and bumped hard enough. Often, folks just put up with the resultant wobbly stock, or they seek out a good replacement stock to replace the broken one. The broken piece is usually held within the clam shell of the receiver, so some folks have tried gluing the piece back to the stock, but this usually doesn't hold up very well, and soon breaks again.

This is a little trick that I have been using for years - it is a simple repair, but seems to hold up quite well.

In the following three pics, the red circles show where the outer portion of the ear has already been cyano-glued back into place. The broken edges of the plastic are prepared by cleaning the faces with denatured alcohol, or some other similar, plastic safe degreaser. The cyano-glue is then applied, and the broken piece placed back into position.



Once the glue dries, a small needle file is used to form a small groove around the outer periphery of the mounting ear. A small (1/16" dia.) hole is drilled at the rear of the mounting ear, from top to bottom. The surface of the plastic is then roughed up with some course grit sandpaper.



The next step is to obtain some small gauge steel wire - about 22 or 24 guage - and loop it through the hole, and twist the wire together firmly, snip off the excess, and fold the tag down flat. I used a heavy-duty garbage bag twist tie, stripped the paper covering off it, and folded it in half, to give me two wires, side by side to reinforce the mounting ear.



The final step is to add a good epoxy cement, such as JB Weld, over the repaired area. This is primarily to maintain the wire in position, but also adds a bit of extra strength to the overall repair.
Viola' - good as new.

I tried using a wooden stock but even that broke. This idea makes a lot of sense.


Regards,
1008mod
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