1701 as Carbine

1701 as Carbine

Joined: March 1st, 2002, 12:22 am

October 10th, 2011, 6:37 am #1


<img border="0" alt="Photobucket" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... G_7382.jpg">

1399 stock, Gamo 4x scope.

The carbine format is,well, fun. Made a huge impact on my ability to shoot it well.

The 1701, as a carbine, took a few turns I'd noit aniticipated. First carbine incarnation was with open sights. This brought the front sight _inside_ the focal point of my dominant eye, and it fuzzed out (the sight, not my eyeball...) With the sight very unclear, my groups suffered. Shooting it as a pistol, using normal pistol forms put the front sight out to where I could focus clearly on the sight blade.

Putting the scope on fixed that. And the true accuracy of the 1701 finally revealed itself. And the limitations of the carbine format also showed up. Ragged holes showed the potential. The carbine's light wieght magnified any flaw in your technique: I have the habit of pushing the gun left and up during the firing cycle... <img alt="happy.gif" src="/images/happy.gif" width="14" height="14">  (which I'm taking is from my squeezing the grip during trigger pull. relaxing the trigger hand stops it, but that will take some practice) My heartbeat was also very evident if you didnt shoot fairly quick once on target. 

The other "limitation" of the carbine format is the ergonomic form factor. It will need a forearm, to protect the air guage, and give your left hand something to hang on to, other than the air tube.

In carbine format, you could easily imagine some short range mutations of some airgunning games: nano-sniping, using .22LR shell casings, micro benchrest, and backyard FT (using the samll reducers).

But I think the _best_ use of the 1701 as carbine would be instruction of new shooters. Low report, no recoil. easy trigger pull. Get the fundamentals down, then move on to bigger guns.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab
<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... od-1-1.jpg">
the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
Last edited by dan_house on October 10th, 2011, 2:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 31st, 2006, 2:52 am

October 10th, 2011, 10:51 am #2

I like carbines. Very nice..
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Joined: July 12th, 2006, 11:35 pm

October 10th, 2011, 1:01 pm #3

<img border="0" alt="Photobucket" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... G_7382.jpg">

1399 stock, Gamo 4x scope.

The carbine format is,well, fun. Made a huge impact on my ability to shoot it well.

The 1701, as a carbine, took a few turns I'd noit aniticipated. First carbine incarnation was with open sights. This brought the front sight _inside_ the focal point of my dominant eye, and it fuzzed out (the sight, not my eyeball...) With the sight very unclear, my groups suffered. Shooting it as a pistol, using normal pistol forms put the front sight out to where I could focus clearly on the sight blade.

Putting the scope on fixed that. And the true accuracy of the 1701 finally revealed itself. And the limitations of the carbine format also showed up. Ragged holes showed the potential. The carbine's light wieght magnified any flaw in your technique: I have the habit of pushing the gun left and up during the firing cycle... <img alt="happy.gif" src="/images/happy.gif" width="14" height="14">  (which I'm taking is from my squeezing the grip during trigger pull. relaxing the trigger hand stops it, but that will take some practice) My heartbeat was also very evident if you didnt shoot fairly quick once on target. 

The other "limitation" of the carbine format is the ergonomic form factor. It will need a forearm, to protect the air guage, and give your left hand something to hang on to, other than the air tube.

In carbine format, you could easily imagine some short range mutations of some airgunning games: nano-sniping, using .22LR shell casings, micro benchrest, and backyard FT (using the samll reducers).

But I think the _best_ use of the 1701 as carbine would be instruction of new shooters. Low report, no recoil. easy trigger pull. Get the fundamentals down, then move on to bigger guns.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab
<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... od-1-1.jpg">
the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
I like it Dan. I like a short gun also. That is a .177?


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Joined: February 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

October 10th, 2011, 2:06 pm #4

<img border="0" alt="Photobucket" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... G_7382.jpg">

1399 stock, Gamo 4x scope.

The carbine format is,well, fun. Made a huge impact on my ability to shoot it well.

The 1701, as a carbine, took a few turns I'd noit aniticipated. First carbine incarnation was with open sights. This brought the front sight _inside_ the focal point of my dominant eye, and it fuzzed out (the sight, not my eyeball...) With the sight very unclear, my groups suffered. Shooting it as a pistol, using normal pistol forms put the front sight out to where I could focus clearly on the sight blade.

Putting the scope on fixed that. And the true accuracy of the 1701 finally revealed itself. And the limitations of the carbine format also showed up. Ragged holes showed the potential. The carbine's light wieght magnified any flaw in your technique: I have the habit of pushing the gun left and up during the firing cycle... <img alt="happy.gif" src="/images/happy.gif" width="14" height="14">  (which I'm taking is from my squeezing the grip during trigger pull. relaxing the trigger hand stops it, but that will take some practice) My heartbeat was also very evident if you didnt shoot fairly quick once on target. 

The other "limitation" of the carbine format is the ergonomic form factor. It will need a forearm, to protect the air guage, and give your left hand something to hang on to, other than the air tube.

In carbine format, you could easily imagine some short range mutations of some airgunning games: nano-sniping, using .22LR shell casings, micro benchrest, and backyard FT (using the samll reducers).

But I think the _best_ use of the 1701 as carbine would be instruction of new shooters. Low report, no recoil. easy trigger pull. Get the fundamentals down, then move on to bigger guns.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab
<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... od-1-1.jpg">
the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
To my eye, a big pistol like the 1701 or the Marauder Pistol cries out to be carbinized.
Looks like fun.

I plink, therefore I am.
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Joined: March 1st, 2002, 12:22 am

October 10th, 2011, 2:22 pm #5

I like it Dan. I like a short gun also. That is a .177?


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esy to feed, even localy in the Bozone

dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab

the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
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Joined: March 1st, 2002, 12:22 am

October 10th, 2011, 2:31 pm #6

<img border="0" alt="Photobucket" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... G_7382.jpg">

1399 stock, Gamo 4x scope.

The carbine format is,well, fun. Made a huge impact on my ability to shoot it well.

The 1701, as a carbine, took a few turns I'd noit aniticipated. First carbine incarnation was with open sights. This brought the front sight _inside_ the focal point of my dominant eye, and it fuzzed out (the sight, not my eyeball...) With the sight very unclear, my groups suffered. Shooting it as a pistol, using normal pistol forms put the front sight out to where I could focus clearly on the sight blade.

Putting the scope on fixed that. And the true accuracy of the 1701 finally revealed itself. And the limitations of the carbine format also showed up. Ragged holes showed the potential. The carbine's light wieght magnified any flaw in your technique: I have the habit of pushing the gun left and up during the firing cycle... <img alt="happy.gif" src="/images/happy.gif" width="14" height="14">  (which I'm taking is from my squeezing the grip during trigger pull. relaxing the trigger hand stops it, but that will take some practice) My heartbeat was also very evident if you didnt shoot fairly quick once on target. 

The other "limitation" of the carbine format is the ergonomic form factor. It will need a forearm, to protect the air guage, and give your left hand something to hang on to, other than the air tube.

In carbine format, you could easily imagine some short range mutations of some airgunning games: nano-sniping, using .22LR shell casings, micro benchrest, and backyard FT (using the samll reducers).

But I think the _best_ use of the 1701 as carbine would be instruction of new shooters. Low report, no recoil. easy trigger pull. Get the fundamentals down, then move on to bigger guns.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab
<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... od-1-1.jpg">
the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
(it was late when I posted, had been working thru some other things that threaten to occupy a lot of my time in the future, and found two Black widows in the shop....)

First is the lighting conditions in the shop were perfect for seeing the pellet, for a lot of the shots, on its way to the target. Looked like a silver grey laser beam. Made calling shots very easy (and reasonably correct). I credit part of that to the relatively low velocity of the 1701

Second, after the light changed to where the "laser beam" effect had stopped, I noticed after the shot broke, and the pel had struck the target, where the crosshairs rested on target (importance of follow thru) is where the pel had landed.  

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab

the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

October 10th, 2011, 2:43 pm #7

potential dan .. How wouls this rig stack up against similar size carbines?
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Joined: March 1st, 2002, 12:22 am

October 10th, 2011, 4:00 pm #8


Except maybe a stock Izzy 42/46....

Remember, its a low power pistol. Just happens to be able to accept a stock

 

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab

the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
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Joined: April 21st, 2010, 12:36 am

October 10th, 2011, 5:04 pm #9

<img border="0" alt="Photobucket" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... G_7382.jpg">

1399 stock, Gamo 4x scope.

The carbine format is,well, fun. Made a huge impact on my ability to shoot it well.

The 1701, as a carbine, took a few turns I'd noit aniticipated. First carbine incarnation was with open sights. This brought the front sight _inside_ the focal point of my dominant eye, and it fuzzed out (the sight, not my eyeball...) With the sight very unclear, my groups suffered. Shooting it as a pistol, using normal pistol forms put the front sight out to where I could focus clearly on the sight blade.

Putting the scope on fixed that. And the true accuracy of the 1701 finally revealed itself. And the limitations of the carbine format also showed up. Ragged holes showed the potential. The carbine's light wieght magnified any flaw in your technique: I have the habit of pushing the gun left and up during the firing cycle... <img alt="happy.gif" src="/images/happy.gif" width="14" height="14">  (which I'm taking is from my squeezing the grip during trigger pull. relaxing the trigger hand stops it, but that will take some practice) My heartbeat was also very evident if you didnt shoot fairly quick once on target. 

The other "limitation" of the carbine format is the ergonomic form factor. It will need a forearm, to protect the air guage, and give your left hand something to hang on to, other than the air tube.

In carbine format, you could easily imagine some short range mutations of some airgunning games: nano-sniping, using .22LR shell casings, micro benchrest, and backyard FT (using the samll reducers).

But I think the _best_ use of the 1701 as carbine would be instruction of new shooters. Low report, no recoil. easy trigger pull. Get the fundamentals down, then move on to bigger guns.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab
<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... od-1-1.jpg">
the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
P-Rod forestock to try and fit to the 1701P. Looks like it might fit with a little bit of Dremel work on the stock and a new barrel band for the 1701P.

Carl
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

October 11th, 2011, 12:22 am #10

<img border="0" alt="Photobucket" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... G_7382.jpg">

1399 stock, Gamo 4x scope.

The carbine format is,well, fun. Made a huge impact on my ability to shoot it well.

The 1701, as a carbine, took a few turns I'd noit aniticipated. First carbine incarnation was with open sights. This brought the front sight _inside_ the focal point of my dominant eye, and it fuzzed out (the sight, not my eyeball...) With the sight very unclear, my groups suffered. Shooting it as a pistol, using normal pistol forms put the front sight out to where I could focus clearly on the sight blade.

Putting the scope on fixed that. And the true accuracy of the 1701 finally revealed itself. And the limitations of the carbine format also showed up. Ragged holes showed the potential. The carbine's light wieght magnified any flaw in your technique: I have the habit of pushing the gun left and up during the firing cycle... <img alt="happy.gif" src="/images/happy.gif" width="14" height="14">  (which I'm taking is from my squeezing the grip during trigger pull. relaxing the trigger hand stops it, but that will take some practice) My heartbeat was also very evident if you didnt shoot fairly quick once on target. 

The other "limitation" of the carbine format is the ergonomic form factor. It will need a forearm, to protect the air guage, and give your left hand something to hang on to, other than the air tube.

In carbine format, you could easily imagine some short range mutations of some airgunning games: nano-sniping, using .22LR shell casings, micro benchrest, and backyard FT (using the samll reducers).

But I think the _best_ use of the 1701 as carbine would be instruction of new shooters. Low report, no recoil. easy trigger pull. Get the fundamentals down, then move on to bigger guns.

 


dr_subsonic's pneumatic research lab
<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v301/ ... od-1-1.jpg">
the Lunatic Fringe of American Airgunning
Southwest Montana's headquarters for Airgunning Supremacy
Proud Sponsor of team_subsonic
Same accuracy potential...adding a sto0ck down/t change the mechanical accuracy, just makes it easier for humans to shoot better.

Carbine...shrouded...and ramped up a little bit to 7.8 foot pounds.
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Will shoot well at 20 yards.
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And makes a nice companuion to a .22 P-Rod. Run them both at 650fps, so the trajecotry/windage is about the same out to 40 yards.
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