Save 18% on your heat bill

Save 18% on your heat bill

Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

September 19th, 2011, 3:52 am #1

Got your attention, didn't I?

Well, that's what the article says, although I think their estimate of 18% is a little optimistic.

The latest issue of Money magazine has an article on weatherization projects. I couldn't find the article online, so I can't post a link. These are the recommendations:

(1) Buy durable weatherstripping for exterior doors. They recommend bronze, and quote a price of $20. However, I bought a roll of Bronze Seal at Ace Hardware today for $13-something. If anyone else is interested, the Ace item number is 51269. This stuff is nailed on and will last forever--foam stripping probably won't last the winter.

(2) Install automatic door sweeps (defined as "draft blocking strips that you attach to the bottom of exterior doors"). To protect against marred floors, they suggest a spring-loaded sweep and recommend one that lifts up as the door opens and presses down when it's closed. Ace has these as well, for around $12.

(3) Cover in-wall air conditioners, as well as window units that are too large to remove for the off-season. They recommend a $60 custom-made cover, although I'm a blue tarp kind of girl myself. Fortunately, I have central air.

(4) Seal cracks where air can enter. They recommend turning on bath, attic and range hood exhaust fans to suck air out of the house. Then hold a stick of burning incense near gaps, such as where pipes enter the wall under sinks and where baseboards meet the floor. Where smoke dances (indicating a draft), spray Great Stuff foam, and use caulk to close up larger cracks.

For spring-loaded door sweeps, they recommend energyfederation.com. I went to their site and it shows lots of helpful products that probably wouldn't have occurred to me.

Also, when I was at Ace, I picked up their latest flyer, and it lists a lot of good deals. They have GE CFLs (squiggly light bulbs) for 2/$3 for 40- and 60-watt equivalents, and 2/$5 for 75 and 100 watt equivalents. Another energy saver, and the price is right. I have had better luck with GE CFLs than some of the other brands.

Any other tips or ideas? (The cheaper the better). Please post them here.
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Joined: October 29th, 2005, 6:29 pm

September 19th, 2011, 12:33 pm #2

Another area to look at. Besides poor insulation, the last apartment I was at I could feel my warm air being sucked up into the attic door. There was a large gap there to cover, but a combo of felt weather stripping and duct tape took care of it.

you could also turn the heat down. I made the mistake of asking the apartment rep if there was a minimum heat setting... the condo's I lived in for instance, you had to keep a min of 55F inside (I'm gone a lot). She told me 75! I said uh okay, and thinking I don't keep it set that high when I in the apartment, I'm certainly not leaving it that high when I leave! Maybe 60.
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Joined: May 23rd, 2006, 5:46 pm

September 19th, 2011, 2:10 pm #3

you can actually buy a cover made just for those that looks pretty darn good.

75 min? she's nuts or what? I could not take that much heat!

insulation, indeed. I walk outside on a frosty morning and we are about the only house with frost or snow (when that happens) still on the roof. Of course my temps may be lower but I had insulation put in right after moving here.

my front door has sweep and seals but I like the sound of the bronze seal and will go check that out. the back door has one but not the other so need to take care of that. Not that I have ever minded a bit of air going in or out..

should get some more new windows this year too. meanwhile we use insulated curtains, and bubble wrap.


Myra in West Texas
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Joined: May 25th, 2006, 12:05 am

September 19th, 2011, 2:36 pm #4

about this attic cover.

Our attic steps pull down from the ceiling and open into the upstairs foyer - I can't cover the stairs with insulation - as it is, with blow in insulation in the floor of the attic, a handful seems to fall out when the attic door is opened. I like the idea of flannel strips or ? door drafts around the door. Is there a cover that wouldn't be attention grabbing? I don't want it to be the first thing someone sees when they go up the stairs, kwim?

We are replacing our door sweeps and have been doing outside maintanence all spring/summer, still have a few things to do - but we're making progress. Replacing door and window trim and caulking them, replacing crawl space vents...
glendaMO
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Joined: December 1st, 2006, 5:36 pm

September 19th, 2011, 3:56 pm #5

Got your attention, didn't I?

Well, that's what the article says, although I think their estimate of 18% is a little optimistic.

The latest issue of Money magazine has an article on weatherization projects. I couldn't find the article online, so I can't post a link. These are the recommendations:

(1) Buy durable weatherstripping for exterior doors. They recommend bronze, and quote a price of $20. However, I bought a roll of Bronze Seal at Ace Hardware today for $13-something. If anyone else is interested, the Ace item number is 51269. This stuff is nailed on and will last forever--foam stripping probably won't last the winter.

(2) Install automatic door sweeps (defined as "draft blocking strips that you attach to the bottom of exterior doors"). To protect against marred floors, they suggest a spring-loaded sweep and recommend one that lifts up as the door opens and presses down when it's closed. Ace has these as well, for around $12.

(3) Cover in-wall air conditioners, as well as window units that are too large to remove for the off-season. They recommend a $60 custom-made cover, although I'm a blue tarp kind of girl myself. Fortunately, I have central air.

(4) Seal cracks where air can enter. They recommend turning on bath, attic and range hood exhaust fans to suck air out of the house. Then hold a stick of burning incense near gaps, such as where pipes enter the wall under sinks and where baseboards meet the floor. Where smoke dances (indicating a draft), spray Great Stuff foam, and use caulk to close up larger cracks.

For spring-loaded door sweeps, they recommend energyfederation.com. I went to their site and it shows lots of helpful products that probably wouldn't have occurred to me.

Also, when I was at Ace, I picked up their latest flyer, and it lists a lot of good deals. They have GE CFLs (squiggly light bulbs) for 2/$3 for 40- and 60-watt equivalents, and 2/$5 for 75 and 100 watt equivalents. Another energy saver, and the price is right. I have had better luck with GE CFLs than some of the other brands.

Any other tips or ideas? (The cheaper the better). Please post them here.
The rubber gasket one I have on my front door has mostly peeled off. I was hoping to replace it with something, but I don't want to have to remove the door if possible.

I will chekc out the bronze weatherstripping for my mother's doors. The foam's not getting it, and her backdoor, we have to stuff wsashcloths in the gaps to help block the air. Without them, you can see daylight all around the door edge.
LisaCNC
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Joined: September 24th, 2009, 3:01 pm

September 19th, 2011, 8:00 pm #6

about this attic cover.

Our attic steps pull down from the ceiling and open into the upstairs foyer - I can't cover the stairs with insulation - as it is, with blow in insulation in the floor of the attic, a handful seems to fall out when the attic door is opened. I like the idea of flannel strips or ? door drafts around the door. Is there a cover that wouldn't be attention grabbing? I don't want it to be the first thing someone sees when they go up the stairs, kwim?

We are replacing our door sweeps and have been doing outside maintanence all spring/summer, still have a few things to do - but we're making progress. Replacing door and window trim and caulking them, replacing crawl space vents...
our attic pull down didn't close all the way for many years. after year 1 we found a huge box to put over the steps when it was closed and i stapled an old comforter to the top of it and line it up with foam AC stripping on the floor. made a HUGE difference.

even now that the (seems like balsa wood) door does close and we have weatherstripping around IT, the box stays as extra insurance against heat loss.

we put plastic up around most of our windows inside and out.

this year i HAVE to remember to get pipe insulation for our radiator pipes inthe basement.

sealing all leaks inthe house - HA - we'd have to just put the whole house in a hefty bag. (we have little to no insulation in the walls. I just seal places that there's a breeze coming in.)
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Joined: May 23rd, 2006, 5:46 pm

September 19th, 2011, 9:34 pm #7

about this attic cover.

Our attic steps pull down from the ceiling and open into the upstairs foyer - I can't cover the stairs with insulation - as it is, with blow in insulation in the floor of the attic, a handful seems to fall out when the attic door is opened. I like the idea of flannel strips or ? door drafts around the door. Is there a cover that wouldn't be attention grabbing? I don't want it to be the first thing someone sees when they go up the stairs, kwim?

We are replacing our door sweeps and have been doing outside maintanence all spring/summer, still have a few things to do - but we're making progress. Replacing door and window trim and caulking them, replacing crawl space vents...
but it is pricey, so something home made along these lines might be just as good.

http://www.cleanairgardening.com/attic-tent.html

Myra in West Texas
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Joined: May 23rd, 2006, 5:46 pm

September 19th, 2011, 9:35 pm #8

The rubber gasket one I have on my front door has mostly peeled off. I was hoping to replace it with something, but I don't want to have to remove the door if possible.

I will chekc out the bronze weatherstripping for my mother's doors. The foam's not getting it, and her backdoor, we have to stuff wsashcloths in the gaps to help block the air. Without them, you can see daylight all around the door edge.
but it is attached to the bottom edge, no idea how you'd do it so it comes out from the bottom without showing where it attaches.

Myra in West Texas
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

September 19th, 2011, 11:58 pm #9

The rubber gasket one I have on my front door has mostly peeled off. I was hoping to replace it with something, but I don't want to have to remove the door if possible.

I will chekc out the bronze weatherstripping for my mother's doors. The foam's not getting it, and her backdoor, we have to stuff wsashcloths in the gaps to help block the air. Without them, you can see daylight all around the door edge.
It nails along the bottom edge.
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

September 20th, 2011, 12:01 am #10

Got your attention, didn't I?

Well, that's what the article says, although I think their estimate of 18% is a little optimistic.

The latest issue of Money magazine has an article on weatherization projects. I couldn't find the article online, so I can't post a link. These are the recommendations:

(1) Buy durable weatherstripping for exterior doors. They recommend bronze, and quote a price of $20. However, I bought a roll of Bronze Seal at Ace Hardware today for $13-something. If anyone else is interested, the Ace item number is 51269. This stuff is nailed on and will last forever--foam stripping probably won't last the winter.

(2) Install automatic door sweeps (defined as "draft blocking strips that you attach to the bottom of exterior doors"). To protect against marred floors, they suggest a spring-loaded sweep and recommend one that lifts up as the door opens and presses down when it's closed. Ace has these as well, for around $12.

(3) Cover in-wall air conditioners, as well as window units that are too large to remove for the off-season. They recommend a $60 custom-made cover, although I'm a blue tarp kind of girl myself. Fortunately, I have central air.

(4) Seal cracks where air can enter. They recommend turning on bath, attic and range hood exhaust fans to suck air out of the house. Then hold a stick of burning incense near gaps, such as where pipes enter the wall under sinks and where baseboards meet the floor. Where smoke dances (indicating a draft), spray Great Stuff foam, and use caulk to close up larger cracks.

For spring-loaded door sweeps, they recommend energyfederation.com. I went to their site and it shows lots of helpful products that probably wouldn't have occurred to me.

Also, when I was at Ace, I picked up their latest flyer, and it lists a lot of good deals. They have GE CFLs (squiggly light bulbs) for 2/$3 for 40- and 60-watt equivalents, and 2/$5 for 75 and 100 watt equivalents. Another energy saver, and the price is right. I have had better luck with GE CFLs than some of the other brands.

Any other tips or ideas? (The cheaper the better). Please post them here.
The article recommends insulating attic hatches. They recommended a $200 attic tent (www.attictent.com). Go take a look and figure out a cheaper alternative!!
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