Kim and the Crazy Quilt

Kim and the Crazy Quilt

Joined: May 25th, 2006, 12:07 am

June 15th, 2012, 3:54 pm #1

or How Kim Went Crazy Trying to Learn Something New...

First of all - let me say that all the women involved are doing this for free and extremely kind and gracious. I am the crazy on in this story AND I KNOW IT!

My whole goal was to learn really nice surface embroidery so that I could do embroidered pictures or the kind of pictures that have different kinds of fabric in them, but they look like something.

I have a lot of embroidery experience and I would say my skill is past beginner for most basic stitches. I gave it up for a long time, though, so I haven't got a lot of stuff and kind of don't want a lot, either. I've got a couple hoops in different sizes and I buy floss as needed for a project then use it up in small 'use it up' projects like little Swedish huck weaving bags.

I do have a lot of thread and strings in white and a pale taupe that I am beginning to dye for a bit of selection.

I am trapped in the 70's (I guess) and the only cotton I have in the house is white or unbleached muslin. I never sew with cotton. I haven't since my kids were little and I was making their own clothes.

The only quilting I ever did was with my grandma. Grandma S. (sigh) She was.... uhhh... :-/ What does a person say about Grandma Olive... She was very happy with herself and her life. She liked quilting and sewing clothes for international orphans. The clothes were made of Fortrel (sp?) so they are probably still around somewhere... not worn out... just like all the clothes she made for me when I was a kid. Anyway- she was tone deaf, but liked to sing and had no sense of colour, but liked to quilt!

I spent a lot of summers being her slave monkey tying off quilts for her. She couldn't quite be convinced that the Great Depression was over and she could teach the VERY cheapest among us a thing or two about saving a penny. AND I MEAN A PENNY. She had a drawer full of short elastic and she would just rifle through it to find a piece when making orphan clothes for example. She never used a seam ripper. She used an old razor blade that was too dull for other things and when it wouldn't cut anymore she would resharpen it.... :-P

Anyway- that was a diverting side trip.

As you all know I've been feeling... menopausal? Sad? Something? And I think when you feel like that it is good to learn something new. SO I've been on this list for a year and I've done a couple things with them and THOUGHT that I would be able to learn some things that would help me in my future crazy quilting needlework goals.

The way the classes are run is HIGHLY organized. You get one lesson at a time and you can't go on until your mentor is satisfied that it is correct. Crazy quilting is a little bit subjective, but they are teaching you the rigid rules before you branch off and do your own thing. I see their point.

I have had one mentor with them. She was from the same province as I am, similar age, same job and when I say I can't get something she believes me. We just really clicked and I was happy that I got her again. I had a couple things made, she said they were correct then I got a call from the organizer (yes... she calls!) and she said my mentor had an emergency and she was going to have to send me to someone else... who just happens to be her best friend... My new mentor is a wonderful person (I'm sure) but I kind of got dumped on her. Then I was told everything I had done was WRONG and had to start over.

So I started over and I just felt very pecked to death! I STILL don't know how the hell to chose a focus fabric or a theme! A THEME! It is a $^%&$# thread roll up. There is no theme...

My insanity creeped to the top there... sorry...

So now I've gotten as far as the actual embroidery and I still hate it. I might even hate it more. I have templates that I have to use for the stitches. I am now on the seam treatment portion of the lesson. I have to put all the stitches together on lines or seams and prove knowledge. It is a list of 13 stitches. When I am done that I have to photocopy or trace my block and show her what I would do on my actual block and the colours I would use.

And trust me - she won't like the colours that I pick and I'm sure she is right. I've never done anything like this before and I swear I will NEVER do anything like this again. I think my mentor is used to being gushed over a little more than I ever would, too. I have been carefully neutral whenever she asks me if I like what I'm doing or enjoying it. A couple days ago I was very honest and told her exactly how I feel and she wrote back saying she hates it when she has artistic block, too. That is not it! It is not artistic block. It is that I HATE IT.

So - reasons not to quit: I've put a lot of money into this stupid project and I need to finish before I can do anything else. There is nowhere locally to learn this and they really are everywhere on the internet. These women really ARE knowledgeable and I could learn a lot from them if I had a better attitude.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 24th, 2006, 6:46 pm

June 15th, 2012, 4:14 pm #2

I understand that maybe your a bit hormonal, but learning something new is supposed to be fun, especially, if your doing it to help yourself feel better.. and quite frankly reading thru what they have had you do, made me want to quit and I am not even in the class... you used the word organized.. I would use the word overly rigid...quilting should be an expression of your creativity... not someone else's. So what if your mentor doesn't like your color scheme, if you do then that should be good enough, I have a hard time with colors too:> that is something that comes with time and practice. But come on this is supposed to be fun and relaxing... Even if they (the women) are spread out all over the web there are many sites I am sure that would welcome you in with open arms...

If your determined to see it thru is there someway you can take a break from it for a bit?

" life isnt about waiting for the storms to pass, its about learning to dance in the rain."
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

June 15th, 2012, 4:50 pm #3

Have you contacted your original mentor to see when she is coming back? Could you have a medical emergency until then? I think this stress qualifies as medical emergency.

Now you are making me wonder if these women are on some of the same boards I post on. Quilting should NOT be that rigid.

------
The road to success is always under construction.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 25th, 2006, 12:07 am

June 15th, 2012, 5:20 pm #4

or list ANYWHERE you and I know some of the same people. I get the feeling that they talk and that I would be quietly snubbed if I tried to re-sub somewhere else.

Honestly I know that they just want me to have a good foundation and it is for MY benefit. That being said it is SO far out of my element that I can't even wrap my head around it and don't know WHY I ever thought that decorating things with lines of different stitches would be for me.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 28th, 2006, 3:48 am

June 15th, 2012, 6:17 pm #5

or How Kim Went Crazy Trying to Learn Something New...

First of all - let me say that all the women involved are doing this for free and extremely kind and gracious. I am the crazy on in this story AND I KNOW IT!

My whole goal was to learn really nice surface embroidery so that I could do embroidered pictures or the kind of pictures that have different kinds of fabric in them, but they look like something.

I have a lot of embroidery experience and I would say my skill is past beginner for most basic stitches. I gave it up for a long time, though, so I haven't got a lot of stuff and kind of don't want a lot, either. I've got a couple hoops in different sizes and I buy floss as needed for a project then use it up in small 'use it up' projects like little Swedish huck weaving bags.

I do have a lot of thread and strings in white and a pale taupe that I am beginning to dye for a bit of selection.

I am trapped in the 70's (I guess) and the only cotton I have in the house is white or unbleached muslin. I never sew with cotton. I haven't since my kids were little and I was making their own clothes.

The only quilting I ever did was with my grandma. Grandma S. (sigh) She was.... uhhh... :-/ What does a person say about Grandma Olive... She was very happy with herself and her life. She liked quilting and sewing clothes for international orphans. The clothes were made of Fortrel (sp?) so they are probably still around somewhere... not worn out... just like all the clothes she made for me when I was a kid. Anyway- she was tone deaf, but liked to sing and had no sense of colour, but liked to quilt!

I spent a lot of summers being her slave monkey tying off quilts for her. She couldn't quite be convinced that the Great Depression was over and she could teach the VERY cheapest among us a thing or two about saving a penny. AND I MEAN A PENNY. She had a drawer full of short elastic and she would just rifle through it to find a piece when making orphan clothes for example. She never used a seam ripper. She used an old razor blade that was too dull for other things and when it wouldn't cut anymore she would resharpen it.... :-P

Anyway- that was a diverting side trip.

As you all know I've been feeling... menopausal? Sad? Something? And I think when you feel like that it is good to learn something new. SO I've been on this list for a year and I've done a couple things with them and THOUGHT that I would be able to learn some things that would help me in my future crazy quilting needlework goals.

The way the classes are run is HIGHLY organized. You get one lesson at a time and you can't go on until your mentor is satisfied that it is correct. Crazy quilting is a little bit subjective, but they are teaching you the rigid rules before you branch off and do your own thing. I see their point.

I have had one mentor with them. She was from the same province as I am, similar age, same job and when I say I can't get something she believes me. We just really clicked and I was happy that I got her again. I had a couple things made, she said they were correct then I got a call from the organizer (yes... she calls!) and she said my mentor had an emergency and she was going to have to send me to someone else... who just happens to be her best friend... My new mentor is a wonderful person (I'm sure) but I kind of got dumped on her. Then I was told everything I had done was WRONG and had to start over.

So I started over and I just felt very pecked to death! I STILL don't know how the hell to chose a focus fabric or a theme! A THEME! It is a $^%&$# thread roll up. There is no theme...

My insanity creeped to the top there... sorry...

So now I've gotten as far as the actual embroidery and I still hate it. I might even hate it more. I have templates that I have to use for the stitches. I am now on the seam treatment portion of the lesson. I have to put all the stitches together on lines or seams and prove knowledge. It is a list of 13 stitches. When I am done that I have to photocopy or trace my block and show her what I would do on my actual block and the colours I would use.

And trust me - she won't like the colours that I pick and I'm sure she is right. I've never done anything like this before and I swear I will NEVER do anything like this again. I think my mentor is used to being gushed over a little more than I ever would, too. I have been carefully neutral whenever she asks me if I like what I'm doing or enjoying it. A couple days ago I was very honest and told her exactly how I feel and she wrote back saying she hates it when she has artistic block, too. That is not it! It is not artistic block. It is that I HATE IT.

So - reasons not to quit: I've put a lot of money into this stupid project and I need to finish before I can do anything else. There is nowhere locally to learn this and they really are everywhere on the internet. These women really ARE knowledgeable and I could learn a lot from them if I had a better attitude.
And as others have said, a hobby should be relaxing and fun. Color is subjective.

I liked your description of your grandmother. She sounds a lot like mine was. She made the ugliest quilts out of double-knit polyester. Those suckers will never wear out, partly because they're polyester and partly because they're so ugly they're only used under something else so you don't have to look at them!

Edited for spelling.
Last edited by SandyinMI on June 15th, 2012, 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 6th, 2008, 10:30 am

June 15th, 2012, 6:31 pm #6

or How Kim Went Crazy Trying to Learn Something New...

First of all - let me say that all the women involved are doing this for free and extremely kind and gracious. I am the crazy on in this story AND I KNOW IT!

My whole goal was to learn really nice surface embroidery so that I could do embroidered pictures or the kind of pictures that have different kinds of fabric in them, but they look like something.

I have a lot of embroidery experience and I would say my skill is past beginner for most basic stitches. I gave it up for a long time, though, so I haven't got a lot of stuff and kind of don't want a lot, either. I've got a couple hoops in different sizes and I buy floss as needed for a project then use it up in small 'use it up' projects like little Swedish huck weaving bags.

I do have a lot of thread and strings in white and a pale taupe that I am beginning to dye for a bit of selection.

I am trapped in the 70's (I guess) and the only cotton I have in the house is white or unbleached muslin. I never sew with cotton. I haven't since my kids were little and I was making their own clothes.

The only quilting I ever did was with my grandma. Grandma S. (sigh) She was.... uhhh... :-/ What does a person say about Grandma Olive... She was very happy with herself and her life. She liked quilting and sewing clothes for international orphans. The clothes were made of Fortrel (sp?) so they are probably still around somewhere... not worn out... just like all the clothes she made for me when I was a kid. Anyway- she was tone deaf, but liked to sing and had no sense of colour, but liked to quilt!

I spent a lot of summers being her slave monkey tying off quilts for her. She couldn't quite be convinced that the Great Depression was over and she could teach the VERY cheapest among us a thing or two about saving a penny. AND I MEAN A PENNY. She had a drawer full of short elastic and she would just rifle through it to find a piece when making orphan clothes for example. She never used a seam ripper. She used an old razor blade that was too dull for other things and when it wouldn't cut anymore she would resharpen it.... :-P

Anyway- that was a diverting side trip.

As you all know I've been feeling... menopausal? Sad? Something? And I think when you feel like that it is good to learn something new. SO I've been on this list for a year and I've done a couple things with them and THOUGHT that I would be able to learn some things that would help me in my future crazy quilting needlework goals.

The way the classes are run is HIGHLY organized. You get one lesson at a time and you can't go on until your mentor is satisfied that it is correct. Crazy quilting is a little bit subjective, but they are teaching you the rigid rules before you branch off and do your own thing. I see their point.

I have had one mentor with them. She was from the same province as I am, similar age, same job and when I say I can't get something she believes me. We just really clicked and I was happy that I got her again. I had a couple things made, she said they were correct then I got a call from the organizer (yes... she calls!) and she said my mentor had an emergency and she was going to have to send me to someone else... who just happens to be her best friend... My new mentor is a wonderful person (I'm sure) but I kind of got dumped on her. Then I was told everything I had done was WRONG and had to start over.

So I started over and I just felt very pecked to death! I STILL don't know how the hell to chose a focus fabric or a theme! A THEME! It is a $^%&$# thread roll up. There is no theme...

My insanity creeped to the top there... sorry...

So now I've gotten as far as the actual embroidery and I still hate it. I might even hate it more. I have templates that I have to use for the stitches. I am now on the seam treatment portion of the lesson. I have to put all the stitches together on lines or seams and prove knowledge. It is a list of 13 stitches. When I am done that I have to photocopy or trace my block and show her what I would do on my actual block and the colours I would use.

And trust me - she won't like the colours that I pick and I'm sure she is right. I've never done anything like this before and I swear I will NEVER do anything like this again. I think my mentor is used to being gushed over a little more than I ever would, too. I have been carefully neutral whenever she asks me if I like what I'm doing or enjoying it. A couple days ago I was very honest and told her exactly how I feel and she wrote back saying she hates it when she has artistic block, too. That is not it! It is not artistic block. It is that I HATE IT.

So - reasons not to quit: I've put a lot of money into this stupid project and I need to finish before I can do anything else. There is nowhere locally to learn this and they really are everywhere on the internet. These women really ARE knowledgeable and I could learn a lot from them if I had a better attitude.
Bull Shit!

Anything I do that I don't have to do is for fun. Also I almost never follow instructions. But I have a good time, like and use what I make. I'm not making valuable heirlooms here, just stuff that I can use and give to people I love. I've made plenty of quilts that wouldn't measure up to lots of people standards. But they have been used and washed and used up.

Having a solid foundation sounds all good and well but to me it sounds like they have control issues. They just want to be in charge and think that their way is the only way. I'm sorry but I know for a fact that people do stuff in a different way and still get to the same finish line.

So if it were me I don't care how much money I spent I would quit and do it on my own(wing it) or find a good book. Did I say it should be fun.

Kind of rambling here but this is the kind of behavior that ticks me off. Most of these types of crafts were used with what people had on hand. Another reason I don't quilt the "proper way", I'm not spending a big amount to have a quilt I don't want to let the dogs sit on. And plenty of times when I've "winged it" I like the finished item so much better than the inspirational one.

Hugs to you Kim, in my opinion its not you who has the wrong attitude.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 20th, 2006, 5:53 pm

June 15th, 2012, 8:47 pm #7

or How Kim Went Crazy Trying to Learn Something New...

First of all - let me say that all the women involved are doing this for free and extremely kind and gracious. I am the crazy on in this story AND I KNOW IT!

My whole goal was to learn really nice surface embroidery so that I could do embroidered pictures or the kind of pictures that have different kinds of fabric in them, but they look like something.

I have a lot of embroidery experience and I would say my skill is past beginner for most basic stitches. I gave it up for a long time, though, so I haven't got a lot of stuff and kind of don't want a lot, either. I've got a couple hoops in different sizes and I buy floss as needed for a project then use it up in small 'use it up' projects like little Swedish huck weaving bags.

I do have a lot of thread and strings in white and a pale taupe that I am beginning to dye for a bit of selection.

I am trapped in the 70's (I guess) and the only cotton I have in the house is white or unbleached muslin. I never sew with cotton. I haven't since my kids were little and I was making their own clothes.

The only quilting I ever did was with my grandma. Grandma S. (sigh) She was.... uhhh... :-/ What does a person say about Grandma Olive... She was very happy with herself and her life. She liked quilting and sewing clothes for international orphans. The clothes were made of Fortrel (sp?) so they are probably still around somewhere... not worn out... just like all the clothes she made for me when I was a kid. Anyway- she was tone deaf, but liked to sing and had no sense of colour, but liked to quilt!

I spent a lot of summers being her slave monkey tying off quilts for her. She couldn't quite be convinced that the Great Depression was over and she could teach the VERY cheapest among us a thing or two about saving a penny. AND I MEAN A PENNY. She had a drawer full of short elastic and she would just rifle through it to find a piece when making orphan clothes for example. She never used a seam ripper. She used an old razor blade that was too dull for other things and when it wouldn't cut anymore she would resharpen it.... :-P

Anyway- that was a diverting side trip.

As you all know I've been feeling... menopausal? Sad? Something? And I think when you feel like that it is good to learn something new. SO I've been on this list for a year and I've done a couple things with them and THOUGHT that I would be able to learn some things that would help me in my future crazy quilting needlework goals.

The way the classes are run is HIGHLY organized. You get one lesson at a time and you can't go on until your mentor is satisfied that it is correct. Crazy quilting is a little bit subjective, but they are teaching you the rigid rules before you branch off and do your own thing. I see their point.

I have had one mentor with them. She was from the same province as I am, similar age, same job and when I say I can't get something she believes me. We just really clicked and I was happy that I got her again. I had a couple things made, she said they were correct then I got a call from the organizer (yes... she calls!) and she said my mentor had an emergency and she was going to have to send me to someone else... who just happens to be her best friend... My new mentor is a wonderful person (I'm sure) but I kind of got dumped on her. Then I was told everything I had done was WRONG and had to start over.

So I started over and I just felt very pecked to death! I STILL don't know how the hell to chose a focus fabric or a theme! A THEME! It is a $^%&$# thread roll up. There is no theme...

My insanity creeped to the top there... sorry...

So now I've gotten as far as the actual embroidery and I still hate it. I might even hate it more. I have templates that I have to use for the stitches. I am now on the seam treatment portion of the lesson. I have to put all the stitches together on lines or seams and prove knowledge. It is a list of 13 stitches. When I am done that I have to photocopy or trace my block and show her what I would do on my actual block and the colours I would use.

And trust me - she won't like the colours that I pick and I'm sure she is right. I've never done anything like this before and I swear I will NEVER do anything like this again. I think my mentor is used to being gushed over a little more than I ever would, too. I have been carefully neutral whenever she asks me if I like what I'm doing or enjoying it. A couple days ago I was very honest and told her exactly how I feel and she wrote back saying she hates it when she has artistic block, too. That is not it! It is not artistic block. It is that I HATE IT.

So - reasons not to quit: I've put a lot of money into this stupid project and I need to finish before I can do anything else. There is nowhere locally to learn this and they really are everywhere on the internet. These women really ARE knowledgeable and I could learn a lot from them if I had a better attitude.
Sometimes the lesson learned is, I hate this and I don't want to do it anymore. OK, you spent money for it. You're miserable. It's over.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

June 15th, 2012, 11:30 pm #8

Bull Shit!

Anything I do that I don't have to do is for fun. Also I almost never follow instructions. But I have a good time, like and use what I make. I'm not making valuable heirlooms here, just stuff that I can use and give to people I love. I've made plenty of quilts that wouldn't measure up to lots of people standards. But they have been used and washed and used up.

Having a solid foundation sounds all good and well but to me it sounds like they have control issues. They just want to be in charge and think that their way is the only way. I'm sorry but I know for a fact that people do stuff in a different way and still get to the same finish line.

So if it were me I don't care how much money I spent I would quit and do it on my own(wing it) or find a good book. Did I say it should be fun.

Kind of rambling here but this is the kind of behavior that ticks me off. Most of these types of crafts were used with what people had on hand. Another reason I don't quilt the "proper way", I'm not spending a big amount to have a quilt I don't want to let the dogs sit on. And plenty of times when I've "winged it" I like the finished item so much better than the inspirational one.

Hugs to you Kim, in my opinion its not you who has the wrong attitude.
There are "correct" ways to do things, and that is what they are trying to teach. That doesn't mean we have to do everything correctly. I once made a flower girl dress that the mother of the bride didn't recognize, LOL. But she also told me she liked it better the way I made it, and I really think she did.

I think this was not a good choice of a class for you. You seem to need a little instruction and then to be turned loose with it--not getting criticism from the Quilting Nazi. You'd probably do it "correctly" and enjoy every minute of it if an experienced quilter (with a sense of humor) sat down and quilted with you. Don't feel bad about dropping the class--it just isn't for you.


Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 25th, 2006, 12:07 am

June 16th, 2012, 1:36 am #9

I have done a lot of sewing and things, too, but there are things that I don't do and would never do- like tissue paper transfer. I know it is a viable method, but I'm never going to do it.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 25th, 2006, 10:01 pm

June 16th, 2012, 2:13 am #10

or How Kim Went Crazy Trying to Learn Something New...

First of all - let me say that all the women involved are doing this for free and extremely kind and gracious. I am the crazy on in this story AND I KNOW IT!

My whole goal was to learn really nice surface embroidery so that I could do embroidered pictures or the kind of pictures that have different kinds of fabric in them, but they look like something.

I have a lot of embroidery experience and I would say my skill is past beginner for most basic stitches. I gave it up for a long time, though, so I haven't got a lot of stuff and kind of don't want a lot, either. I've got a couple hoops in different sizes and I buy floss as needed for a project then use it up in small 'use it up' projects like little Swedish huck weaving bags.

I do have a lot of thread and strings in white and a pale taupe that I am beginning to dye for a bit of selection.

I am trapped in the 70's (I guess) and the only cotton I have in the house is white or unbleached muslin. I never sew with cotton. I haven't since my kids were little and I was making their own clothes.

The only quilting I ever did was with my grandma. Grandma S. (sigh) She was.... uhhh... :-/ What does a person say about Grandma Olive... She was very happy with herself and her life. She liked quilting and sewing clothes for international orphans. The clothes were made of Fortrel (sp?) so they are probably still around somewhere... not worn out... just like all the clothes she made for me when I was a kid. Anyway- she was tone deaf, but liked to sing and had no sense of colour, but liked to quilt!

I spent a lot of summers being her slave monkey tying off quilts for her. She couldn't quite be convinced that the Great Depression was over and she could teach the VERY cheapest among us a thing or two about saving a penny. AND I MEAN A PENNY. She had a drawer full of short elastic and she would just rifle through it to find a piece when making orphan clothes for example. She never used a seam ripper. She used an old razor blade that was too dull for other things and when it wouldn't cut anymore she would resharpen it.... :-P

Anyway- that was a diverting side trip.

As you all know I've been feeling... menopausal? Sad? Something? And I think when you feel like that it is good to learn something new. SO I've been on this list for a year and I've done a couple things with them and THOUGHT that I would be able to learn some things that would help me in my future crazy quilting needlework goals.

The way the classes are run is HIGHLY organized. You get one lesson at a time and you can't go on until your mentor is satisfied that it is correct. Crazy quilting is a little bit subjective, but they are teaching you the rigid rules before you branch off and do your own thing. I see their point.

I have had one mentor with them. She was from the same province as I am, similar age, same job and when I say I can't get something she believes me. We just really clicked and I was happy that I got her again. I had a couple things made, she said they were correct then I got a call from the organizer (yes... she calls!) and she said my mentor had an emergency and she was going to have to send me to someone else... who just happens to be her best friend... My new mentor is a wonderful person (I'm sure) but I kind of got dumped on her. Then I was told everything I had done was WRONG and had to start over.

So I started over and I just felt very pecked to death! I STILL don't know how the hell to chose a focus fabric or a theme! A THEME! It is a $^%&$# thread roll up. There is no theme...

My insanity creeped to the top there... sorry...

So now I've gotten as far as the actual embroidery and I still hate it. I might even hate it more. I have templates that I have to use for the stitches. I am now on the seam treatment portion of the lesson. I have to put all the stitches together on lines or seams and prove knowledge. It is a list of 13 stitches. When I am done that I have to photocopy or trace my block and show her what I would do on my actual block and the colours I would use.

And trust me - she won't like the colours that I pick and I'm sure she is right. I've never done anything like this before and I swear I will NEVER do anything like this again. I think my mentor is used to being gushed over a little more than I ever would, too. I have been carefully neutral whenever she asks me if I like what I'm doing or enjoying it. A couple days ago I was very honest and told her exactly how I feel and she wrote back saying she hates it when she has artistic block, too. That is not it! It is not artistic block. It is that I HATE IT.

So - reasons not to quit: I've put a lot of money into this stupid project and I need to finish before I can do anything else. There is nowhere locally to learn this and they really are everywhere on the internet. These women really ARE knowledgeable and I could learn a lot from them if I had a better attitude.
I have to say I agree with everyone here about dropping it if you aren't finding fun and satisfaction in the class. HOWEVER, I also "get" the desire and drive to finish the damn thing, too, just to prove to the quilt nazis that you CAN. And to prove to yourself that you're not a quitter. Everyone here has given you "permission" to quit. I want to give you permission to press on. Anything worth doing is worth doing well, right? My daughter learned a LOT by having to sew for a 4H judge. The perfection they are looking for is not possible to achieve, but in the striving for it comes a much better finished product than would ever be had from less striving, for sewing for a lower standard. My daughter is out of 4H and will never again sew with such a high standard and is thrilled to know this, but she is a far better seamstress after just a few years in 4H because of that unattainable standard.

My point is, I get it. I guess you have to decide how badly you want to show those quippy quilt queens that you're not a quilt quitter! My advice (not that you asked, but this IS me, after all) is to weigh it all out and make your choice to continue or to quit based on final outcome. When all is said and done, will you feel better 6 months or a year from now using or displaying your beautiful, near-perfect quilt? Or 6 months from now, will you be less crazy from making your crazy quilt if you quit the crazy class with the crazy teachers? I'm guessing it will look almost identical, and as long as you don't invite the quilt nazis to your home, no one would ever know that you dropped the class and finished it on your own.

BUT...YOU will know. And that may mean enough to you that it's worth dealing with the quilting queens. Only you can answer that.

Whatever you decide, we want pictures!

Blessings,

Bethann
Matthew 6:33
http://gettingtheresimply.blogspot.com/

"Live in such a way that you would not be ashamed to sell your parrot to the town gossip." --Will Rogers
Quote
Like
Share