The School Nurse

The School Nurse

Charlie
Charlie

June 13th, 2005, 4:46 pm #1

Been thinking about this, and decided to open it up to you all for ideas.

A friend is expecting her second child this October, and fully expects to breastfeed as she did with her first. As a Junior High School teacher, she jokingly suggested making life simple by setting up porta-creche in her classroom and nursing on demand. After all, it would be real-life sex ed, eh? A bit like tending the science class frog or such.

In chatting this up a bit, her principal also breastfed her children, as have a few other teachers, it seems.

So, some sales points:

Back in class sooner - 3 weeks v six (max option under contract), savings on substitute teacher pay

Fabulous example of good behavior - consequences of early sex (sugarbag baby exercise come to life) v family/social support

Minimal interruption to class - her subject can be read/discussed while nursing

What else? Any counter-squwak arguments?
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tam
tam

June 13th, 2005, 7:21 pm #2

I can see many problems with this.

1st off being.... I'm not sure a doctor would ok returning to work after just 3 weeks. I know mine didn't.

2nd being .... newborns cry a lot, pee a lot and eat alot. There would be little teaching going on that classroom. My son ate every 1 1/2 hr and had to be changed (sometimes the entire outfit) each time. It took him about an hour to eat also. This was when he a newborn. And if he was awake? He was crying his heart out.

3rd being.... breastfeeding is still(however wrongly) not common so the "thrill" of seeing a breast for the kids would be a distraction.

4th being..... the period of time immediately after the birth of a baby is a time of bonding and recovery for both baby and mother. Let's not set a precedent that would ultimately result in little to no maternity leave. I took off work for 6 weeks after delivery. I needed longer.
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Wayne
Wayne

June 13th, 2005, 7:32 pm #3

Been thinking about this, and decided to open it up to you all for ideas.

A friend is expecting her second child this October, and fully expects to breastfeed as she did with her first. As a Junior High School teacher, she jokingly suggested making life simple by setting up porta-creche in her classroom and nursing on demand. After all, it would be real-life sex ed, eh? A bit like tending the science class frog or such.

In chatting this up a bit, her principal also breastfed her children, as have a few other teachers, it seems.

So, some sales points:

Back in class sooner - 3 weeks v six (max option under contract), savings on substitute teacher pay

Fabulous example of good behavior - consequences of early sex (sugarbag baby exercise come to life) v family/social support

Minimal interruption to class - her subject can be read/discussed while nursing

What else? Any counter-squwak arguments?
I think that it is a wonderful opportunity for her to talk to the class about the many advantages to the mother and child of breastfeeding. Not a long lecture, just a few words each time about different aspects. If it's done right, it should increase the number of girls in the class who later breastfeed their children. Given that encouraging breastfeeding is public policy in many states, and clearly a health benefit, I think that this can legitimately count as educating the students, even if it isn't in the curriculum.

It is also a chance for the same girls to see that having a baby significantly alters your life; in some ways for the better and in some ways for the worse. The more they know about the realities of being a mother the less likely they are to make poor choices about when and why to become a mother. Again, part of the education that children need to get and usually don't get.

The boys in the class will benefit from having to learn how to view breasts in a non-sexual manner. They've got a dual-purpose organ of their own; it shouldn't be too difficult to get them to understand the concept. I'm sure everyone on BFF understands the importance of this bit of education.

I had a house guest with a baby that age, and I found that I wound up bonded to the baby. This might happen to some of the boys in the class too. A useful bit of learning about one aspect of fatherhood.


My prediction is that, if she does it, her class will do better than expected, and that it will be because she and the class will have a closer relationship than any other class in the school has to their teacher.
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JB
JB

June 13th, 2005, 8:14 pm #4

Been thinking about this, and decided to open it up to you all for ideas.

A friend is expecting her second child this October, and fully expects to breastfeed as she did with her first. As a Junior High School teacher, she jokingly suggested making life simple by setting up porta-creche in her classroom and nursing on demand. After all, it would be real-life sex ed, eh? A bit like tending the science class frog or such.

In chatting this up a bit, her principal also breastfed her children, as have a few other teachers, it seems.

So, some sales points:

Back in class sooner - 3 weeks v six (max option under contract), savings on substitute teacher pay

Fabulous example of good behavior - consequences of early sex (sugarbag baby exercise come to life) v family/social support

Minimal interruption to class - her subject can be read/discussed while nursing

What else? Any counter-squwak arguments?
Does the school administration allow teachers to take their children to school with them and bottle feed them?

If you do this, be prepared for problems, like losing your job. I don't think many employers would allow you to take your children to work with you. What if the baby cries in class? When at work, you are there to do your job.

I am putting on my flame-retardant suit right now.
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Anudist
Anudist

June 13th, 2005, 10:01 pm #5

Been thinking about this, and decided to open it up to you all for ideas.

A friend is expecting her second child this October, and fully expects to breastfeed as she did with her first. As a Junior High School teacher, she jokingly suggested making life simple by setting up porta-creche in her classroom and nursing on demand. After all, it would be real-life sex ed, eh? A bit like tending the science class frog or such.

In chatting this up a bit, her principal also breastfed her children, as have a few other teachers, it seems.

So, some sales points:

Back in class sooner - 3 weeks v six (max option under contract), savings on substitute teacher pay

Fabulous example of good behavior - consequences of early sex (sugarbag baby exercise come to life) v family/social support

Minimal interruption to class - her subject can be read/discussed while nursing

What else? Any counter-squwak arguments?
since the child is in class already, maybe will learn more at an earlier age.

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John Bayko
John Bayko

June 14th, 2005, 2:04 am #6

Been thinking about this, and decided to open it up to you all for ideas.

A friend is expecting her second child this October, and fully expects to breastfeed as she did with her first. As a Junior High School teacher, she jokingly suggested making life simple by setting up porta-creche in her classroom and nursing on demand. After all, it would be real-life sex ed, eh? A bit like tending the science class frog or such.

In chatting this up a bit, her principal also breastfed her children, as have a few other teachers, it seems.

So, some sales points:

Back in class sooner - 3 weeks v six (max option under contract), savings on substitute teacher pay

Fabulous example of good behavior - consequences of early sex (sugarbag baby exercise come to life) v family/social support

Minimal interruption to class - her subject can be read/discussed while nursing

What else? Any counter-squwak arguments?
Actually, my first reaction was, "mothers only get six weeks off in the U.S?".

My general advice is as for any situation, "prepare". Expect there will be problems (figity baby, tragically funny diaper changing accidents, etc.), and make plans to allow class to continue as the mother deals with them. There may be no real savings for a substitute teacher in the end.

But still, six weeks?
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 14th, 2005, 2:13 am #7

Been thinking about this, and decided to open it up to you all for ideas.

A friend is expecting her second child this October, and fully expects to breastfeed as she did with her first. As a Junior High School teacher, she jokingly suggested making life simple by setting up porta-creche in her classroom and nursing on demand. After all, it would be real-life sex ed, eh? A bit like tending the science class frog or such.

In chatting this up a bit, her principal also breastfed her children, as have a few other teachers, it seems.

So, some sales points:

Back in class sooner - 3 weeks v six (max option under contract), savings on substitute teacher pay

Fabulous example of good behavior - consequences of early sex (sugarbag baby exercise come to life) v family/social support

Minimal interruption to class - her subject can be read/discussed while nursing

What else? Any counter-squwak arguments?
Do you guys really believe in a era when a 1-second glimpse f J.J.' nipple caused national pandemonium that parents are going to accept having their young innocents exposed to breastfeeding in the classroom? Dream on!
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tam
tam

June 14th, 2005, 3:19 am #8

Actually, my first reaction was, "mothers only get six weeks off in the U.S?".

My general advice is as for any situation, "prepare". Expect there will be problems (figity baby, tragically funny diaper changing accidents, etc.), and make plans to allow class to continue as the mother deals with them. There may be no real savings for a substitute teacher in the end.

But still, six weeks?
And unless you have vacation time or sick leave accumilated, it's UNPAID maternity leave. I was only working part time so had NO sick leave and only 1 week of vacation time.
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Wayne
Wayne

June 14th, 2005, 5:25 pm #9

Do you guys really believe in a era when a 1-second glimpse f J.J.' nipple caused national pandemonium that parents are going to accept having their young innocents exposed to breastfeeding in the classroom? Dream on!
As I read Charlie's post, this would be one teacher among a number and as long as the school isn't in a part of the country where the RRR dominate the school board election process, there shouldn't be a problem. The school just has to inform the parents about what will be happening in that classroom and ask them if they:

A. Definitely want their child in her class.
B. Prefer to have their child in her class.
C. Don't care if their child is in her class or not.
D. Prefer that their child is not in her class.
E. Definitely don't want their child in her class.

My guess is that there would be enough in the A group to fill her class.

As far as the JJ thing went, what I noticed was outrage from the rabble rousers of the RRR and the administration, condemnation of them from the left, and a "When is America ever going to grow up?" attitude from the rest of the world.

Maybe the pandemonium was regional; I don't think Washington state has much in common with Florida (I think that is where you have said that you live).
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 14th, 2005, 7:13 pm #10

The pandemonium was pretty much national, Wayne, and certainly at high levels in our government in Washington which resulted in stiff fines from the FCC to the stations that inadvertently showed it, as well as new rules requiring ALL stations to install expensive digital delay equipment so such a terrible affront to humankind can never happen again. From now on when you watch "live" entertainment shows they won't be live at all thanks to JJ' nipple. I'd considered this a pretty drastic reaction for 1 second of a nipple. So imagine what many parents would think of exposed breasts in a classroom.
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