medical reasons for wearing

medical reasons for wearing

Joined: March 20th, 2004, 6:34 pm

May 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm #1

I may have written about this some time ago, but we have had problems in our household with my youngest daughter wearing her bras excessively, actually doubling-up her bras and wearing them even to sleep. Given that she is in her early teens, still developing, and relatively new to bra-wearing, I let it go for some time without pressing, thinking that perhaps her reasoning for wearing hers 24/7 were either social (peer pressure), or perhaps a novelty (feeling feminine in her bra), or maybe just the social awkwardness and self esteem issues that often come in your early teens.

I eventually had a long sit down top with her about 2 weeks ago, and found out that her issue was actually a cosmetic issue, meaning the way her breasts loooked. To me, her breasts looked to be in the midst of that awkward phase of turning from nipples into breasts, but I got a second opinion from my GP and it turns out she has what is commonly called Tubular Breasts, or Puffy Nipples. Basically, this is where the areala or pink portion of the breast is enlarged and prominent, causing a somewhat 2-tier effect between areola and breast. Puffy areolae are often related to an anatomic situation called tubular breast where the areolae "herniate" or protrude from the breast tissue as if a tight ring were present around the base of the nipple itself.


This was obvious when she demonstrated wearing her t-shirt braless, and causes her (UNDERSTANDIBLY) great embarrassment. Hence her devotion to bra-wearing 24/7.

I think she looks just fine braless, and have let her know how I feel. However, she is embarassed, and wishes to make a change.

Well, we are consulting a specialist, to see about corrective surgery, as both my husband and I would like to do what we can to help restore her self-esteem body-image wise, and most importantly, we would like to give her the option of living a bra-free lifestyle if she wishes.

Bottom line, as a non-wearer myself, I'm all for women ridding of their bras, and actually have become quite active in encouraging people in my life and social circle to do so......., but I guess I was also awakened by this experience with my youngest daughter, and realize that some people wear a bra for different reasons, such as a medical/cosmetic reason such as this, and well, I guess it's their right to wear one. I suppose some people are just embarrassed by the shape, size etc of their anatomy, and at a tender age, may have been made fun of because of that.

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Slomo
Slomo

May 18th, 2005, 1:05 pm #2

But, did the doctor say that the shape of her breasts was just a temporary phase in the process of development, as Nat suggested, or is it showing signs of being permanent? If there's talk of surgery, it would seem to be a permanent condition. Otherwise I'd have thought that reassuring her that she's normal and not ugly, and anyway the puffy nipples are temporary, would be the best thing.
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michaela
michaela

May 18th, 2005, 3:33 pm #3

I may have written about this some time ago, but we have had problems in our household with my youngest daughter wearing her bras excessively, actually doubling-up her bras and wearing them even to sleep. Given that she is in her early teens, still developing, and relatively new to bra-wearing, I let it go for some time without pressing, thinking that perhaps her reasoning for wearing hers 24/7 were either social (peer pressure), or perhaps a novelty (feeling feminine in her bra), or maybe just the social awkwardness and self esteem issues that often come in your early teens.

I eventually had a long sit down top with her about 2 weeks ago, and found out that her issue was actually a cosmetic issue, meaning the way her breasts loooked. To me, her breasts looked to be in the midst of that awkward phase of turning from nipples into breasts, but I got a second opinion from my GP and it turns out she has what is commonly called Tubular Breasts, or Puffy Nipples. Basically, this is where the areala or pink portion of the breast is enlarged and prominent, causing a somewhat 2-tier effect between areola and breast. Puffy areolae are often related to an anatomic situation called tubular breast where the areolae "herniate" or protrude from the breast tissue as if a tight ring were present around the base of the nipple itself.


This was obvious when she demonstrated wearing her t-shirt braless, and causes her (UNDERSTANDIBLY) great embarrassment. Hence her devotion to bra-wearing 24/7.

I think she looks just fine braless, and have let her know how I feel. However, she is embarassed, and wishes to make a change.

Well, we are consulting a specialist, to see about corrective surgery, as both my husband and I would like to do what we can to help restore her self-esteem body-image wise, and most importantly, we would like to give her the option of living a bra-free lifestyle if she wishes.

Bottom line, as a non-wearer myself, I'm all for women ridding of their bras, and actually have become quite active in encouraging people in my life and social circle to do so......., but I guess I was also awakened by this experience with my youngest daughter, and realize that some people wear a bra for different reasons, such as a medical/cosmetic reason such as this, and well, I guess it's their right to wear one. I suppose some people are just embarrassed by the shape, size etc of their anatomy, and at a tender age, may have been made fun of because of that.
I am glad you had a chance to talk with your daughter about the bra worries you have.
I am wondering about something though and don't want you to think I am criticizing in any way, but it popped into my little mind as a concern your daughter might have. If I remember you were talking a little bit here on BFF before y'all made the big move to Texas about possibly having a breast enlargment surgery yourself. I know you have talked about your brafree style while not at work and that you have pierced and prominant nips. So what I am wondering is if your youngest maybe feels like she can't except her own natural breasts as good enough with you as an example.

I know, that sounded tough, sorry, I don't mean it to, But if you did get the surgery and she sees you every day, doesn't this reinforce to her that natural is a hard concept for her to grasp, because she doesn't really have an example, and that surgery is the answer?
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Joined: March 20th, 2004, 6:34 pm

May 18th, 2005, 6:15 pm #4

"I am glad you had a chance to talk with your daughter about the bra worries you have.
I am wondering about something though and don't want you to think I am criticizing in any way, but it popped into my little mind as a concern your daughter might have. If I remember you were talking a little bit here on BFF before y'all made the big move about possibly having a breast enlargment surgery yourself. I know you have talked about your brafree style while not at work and that you have pierced and prominant nips. So what I am wondering is if your youngest maybe feels like she can't except her own natural breasts as good enough with you as an example".

Thanks Michaela, yeah we actually had a big heart-to-heart on this one, followed by tears and then several other talks which have only made us closer together. I have yet to have the enhancement, that wont be until 8 weeks from now so that's not an issue here.

Yes my nipples are prominent, but also a non-issue because they've always been very prominent, even to the point where they couldn't be hidden with a bra or clothing. I'm so used to it, as is my family, it's a non-issue and non factor.


"I know, that sounded tough, sorry, I don't mean it to, But if you did get the surgery and she sees you every day, doesn't this reinforce to her that natural is a hard concept for her to grasp, because she doesn't really have an example, and that surgery is the answer? "

No offence taken Michaela. We all have different viewpoints. I'm of the mindset that self-improvement means dieting, exercise, AND modern surgery. To me, surgery is self-improvement, whether it be dental surgery (braces, teeth bleaching etc) or cosmetic surgery, it's all for the same cause - self improvement.

My objective to my daughters is to teach body acceptance, which I do. I have been urging them to consider foregoing their bras for years now, with some success, and some not (middle daughter decided to forego them altogether, older occasionally, younger wears them always). In the end, it's their choice. In my 'lil one's case, her breasts began forming at a very young age (from age 9 believe it or not), and are obviously different than most visually. Basically, for a graphic, her areolas project out nearly as much as her breasts themselves, which gives a kind of boob-on-boob look and are obvious thru her tops when braless. So, I understand the self-conciousness she feels, and support her decision to hide them. The option came down to either hiding them with a bra, or hiding them with surgery. Given that both bra-wearing and surgery have an element of health risks, I'd rather she take a calculated risk in a controlled environment rather than roll the bones with 24/7 bra-wearing. So, I'm happy she chose surgery.
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Joined: March 20th, 2004, 6:34 pm

May 18th, 2005, 6:54 pm #5

"Anonomous" would have been me. Sorry, forgot to type in my name.

Thanks really Michaela for posing those thoughts and questions, discussion is always welcomed and I value your opinion, as I value all's opinions out there. Take that as a personal invite to yall to chime in!

kath
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Joined: March 20th, 2004, 6:34 pm

May 18th, 2005, 7:01 pm #6

But, did the doctor say that the shape of her breasts was just a temporary phase in the process of development, as Nat suggested, or is it showing signs of being permanent? If there's talk of surgery, it would seem to be a permanent condition. Otherwise I'd have thought that reassuring her that she's normal and not ugly, and anyway the puffy nipples are temporary, would be the best thing.
We had another opinion on that, and it was determined to be a permanent situation. She could live with it yes, and said she would, but that she will continue to wear a padded bra if that's the case. Over the past 3 or so years I have urged her to forego her bra at least occasionally (weekends, time off at home etc) with no avail. The good thing is, she has agreed that as a tradeoff of having corrective surgery, she will give brafreedom a good try.
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BigAl
BigAl

May 18th, 2005, 8:47 pm #7

I may have written about this some time ago, but we have had problems in our household with my youngest daughter wearing her bras excessively, actually doubling-up her bras and wearing them even to sleep. Given that she is in her early teens, still developing, and relatively new to bra-wearing, I let it go for some time without pressing, thinking that perhaps her reasoning for wearing hers 24/7 were either social (peer pressure), or perhaps a novelty (feeling feminine in her bra), or maybe just the social awkwardness and self esteem issues that often come in your early teens.

I eventually had a long sit down top with her about 2 weeks ago, and found out that her issue was actually a cosmetic issue, meaning the way her breasts loooked. To me, her breasts looked to be in the midst of that awkward phase of turning from nipples into breasts, but I got a second opinion from my GP and it turns out she has what is commonly called Tubular Breasts, or Puffy Nipples. Basically, this is where the areala or pink portion of the breast is enlarged and prominent, causing a somewhat 2-tier effect between areola and breast. Puffy areolae are often related to an anatomic situation called tubular breast where the areolae "herniate" or protrude from the breast tissue as if a tight ring were present around the base of the nipple itself.


This was obvious when she demonstrated wearing her t-shirt braless, and causes her (UNDERSTANDIBLY) great embarrassment. Hence her devotion to bra-wearing 24/7.

I think she looks just fine braless, and have let her know how I feel. However, she is embarassed, and wishes to make a change.

Well, we are consulting a specialist, to see about corrective surgery, as both my husband and I would like to do what we can to help restore her self-esteem body-image wise, and most importantly, we would like to give her the option of living a bra-free lifestyle if she wishes.

Bottom line, as a non-wearer myself, I'm all for women ridding of their bras, and actually have become quite active in encouraging people in my life and social circle to do so......., but I guess I was also awakened by this experience with my youngest daughter, and realize that some people wear a bra for different reasons, such as a medical/cosmetic reason such as this, and well, I guess it's their right to wear one. I suppose some people are just embarrassed by the shape, size etc of their anatomy, and at a tender age, may have been made fun of because of that.
Well, to be honest Kath, I'm extremely uneasy about your daughter having corrective surgery. From what you describe, I believe your daughter's breasts/areolae are probably completely normal for a girl of her age. It is not unusual at all for the areolae to stick out more than the breasts; indeed, I would go so far as to say that it's even 'the norm'. (That's why there are so many porno sites 'out there' containing the phrase 'puffy nipples' as it's just a euphemism to indicate that visitors to these sites will see pictures of very young girls).

I would think it is unlikely for your daughter to have genuine tubular breasts.

There is a website showing photos of different sorts of completely normal breasts which - yes- includes 'tubular'. If I can find it I'll post the URL here.
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BigAl
BigAl

May 18th, 2005, 8:50 pm #8

Ha, found it straight away (Search Engines are a wonderful thing).

http://www.007b.com/breast_gallery.php

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michaela
michaela

May 18th, 2005, 10:06 pm #9

"I am glad you had a chance to talk with your daughter about the bra worries you have.
I am wondering about something though and don't want you to think I am criticizing in any way, but it popped into my little mind as a concern your daughter might have. If I remember you were talking a little bit here on BFF before y'all made the big move about possibly having a breast enlargment surgery yourself. I know you have talked about your brafree style while not at work and that you have pierced and prominant nips. So what I am wondering is if your youngest maybe feels like she can't except her own natural breasts as good enough with you as an example".

Thanks Michaela, yeah we actually had a big heart-to-heart on this one, followed by tears and then several other talks which have only made us closer together. I have yet to have the enhancement, that wont be until 8 weeks from now so that's not an issue here.

Yes my nipples are prominent, but also a non-issue because they've always been very prominent, even to the point where they couldn't be hidden with a bra or clothing. I'm so used to it, as is my family, it's a non-issue and non factor.


"I know, that sounded tough, sorry, I don't mean it to, But if you did get the surgery and she sees you every day, doesn't this reinforce to her that natural is a hard concept for her to grasp, because she doesn't really have an example, and that surgery is the answer? "

No offence taken Michaela. We all have different viewpoints. I'm of the mindset that self-improvement means dieting, exercise, AND modern surgery. To me, surgery is self-improvement, whether it be dental surgery (braces, teeth bleaching etc) or cosmetic surgery, it's all for the same cause - self improvement.

My objective to my daughters is to teach body acceptance, which I do. I have been urging them to consider foregoing their bras for years now, with some success, and some not (middle daughter decided to forego them altogether, older occasionally, younger wears them always). In the end, it's their choice. In my 'lil one's case, her breasts began forming at a very young age (from age 9 believe it or not), and are obviously different than most visually. Basically, for a graphic, her areolas project out nearly as much as her breasts themselves, which gives a kind of boob-on-boob look and are obvious thru her tops when braless. So, I understand the self-conciousness she feels, and support her decision to hide them. The option came down to either hiding them with a bra, or hiding them with surgery. Given that both bra-wearing and surgery have an element of health risks, I'd rather she take a calculated risk in a controlled environment rather than roll the bones with 24/7 bra-wearing. So, I'm happy she chose surgery.
Kath,
Thanks for taking my question in the spirit it was intended. After the day I had yesterday I didn’t want you or anyone else to think I was coming down on you. And since I wasn’t sure if you had had your surgery or not I was afraid I might have been bringing up a non-issue.

I have no problem with anyone getting a surgical fix for a problem that bothers them to no end. I always want to explore all angles to a question to see if all possible perspectives have been seen. I know how hard life is for our girls these days, and if she is suffering then by all means, you should do what you can to help.

So glad you brought the subject to the table for us to share our thoughts. I would be interested to know what it is they will do in the procedure to correct this.
michaela
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Adelle
Adelle

May 19th, 2005, 1:51 am #10

I may have written about this some time ago, but we have had problems in our household with my youngest daughter wearing her bras excessively, actually doubling-up her bras and wearing them even to sleep. Given that she is in her early teens, still developing, and relatively new to bra-wearing, I let it go for some time without pressing, thinking that perhaps her reasoning for wearing hers 24/7 were either social (peer pressure), or perhaps a novelty (feeling feminine in her bra), or maybe just the social awkwardness and self esteem issues that often come in your early teens.

I eventually had a long sit down top with her about 2 weeks ago, and found out that her issue was actually a cosmetic issue, meaning the way her breasts loooked. To me, her breasts looked to be in the midst of that awkward phase of turning from nipples into breasts, but I got a second opinion from my GP and it turns out she has what is commonly called Tubular Breasts, or Puffy Nipples. Basically, this is where the areala or pink portion of the breast is enlarged and prominent, causing a somewhat 2-tier effect between areola and breast. Puffy areolae are often related to an anatomic situation called tubular breast where the areolae "herniate" or protrude from the breast tissue as if a tight ring were present around the base of the nipple itself.


This was obvious when she demonstrated wearing her t-shirt braless, and causes her (UNDERSTANDIBLY) great embarrassment. Hence her devotion to bra-wearing 24/7.

I think she looks just fine braless, and have let her know how I feel. However, she is embarassed, and wishes to make a change.

Well, we are consulting a specialist, to see about corrective surgery, as both my husband and I would like to do what we can to help restore her self-esteem body-image wise, and most importantly, we would like to give her the option of living a bra-free lifestyle if she wishes.

Bottom line, as a non-wearer myself, I'm all for women ridding of their bras, and actually have become quite active in encouraging people in my life and social circle to do so......., but I guess I was also awakened by this experience with my youngest daughter, and realize that some people wear a bra for different reasons, such as a medical/cosmetic reason such as this, and well, I guess it's their right to wear one. I suppose some people are just embarrassed by the shape, size etc of their anatomy, and at a tender age, may have been made fun of because of that.
My nipples were very much like that when I was 12 and still somewhat so when I was 14 (as can be seen in pictures from that time) but this has decreased over time and the are farely ordinary now (if a little on the small side). When I asked about this I was told it was quite expected and I would probably have large, beautiful breasts by the time I was 20 (genetic you know). Don't know if that helps. I have a lot of info on my site and if you wish I will give you the URL. E-mail me.
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