Me and My Shadow

Me and My Shadow

Joined: September 20th, 2003, 4:27 pm

August 31st, 2005, 4:31 pm #1

It is pretty quiet here and BFF these days. I only wish it were as quiet in my mind. I have been watching the news of the hurricane and all that horror, and have been watching the price of gas go through the roof. I have missed a week of bike rides because our youngest daughter was home all last week sick, she is better now, thanks, and have been feeling just a little gloomy about the whole world.

This morning I forced my feet out the door with Peter's and my bikes and we went for a ride. As I am heading out I am wondering if I should be working so hard for something that seems so frivolous when all that is going on in the world is such a mess. But I still managed to go.

The sun was just coming up over the trees as we took off and there was actually a chill in the wind when we first started down the hill, that soon disappeared, but I happily noted that it was there. I rode for just a tiny bit over an hour this morning. All the motorists that past us during that time waved. I couldn't help thinking they probably figured they better make friends since they would maybe be on bikes next week too with gas the way it is.

On the last stretch before the end of our ride the sun was shining so brightly that there was a full shadow of me and my bike to my left on the road. I could see quite obviously that the lady in the shadow wasn't wearing a bra!

My spirits were lifted for having ridden that bike this morning. I know that all is still pretty screwed up in the world right now. But for an hour of this sunny morning I was transported to the wind and the sun. I was nowhere and everywhere else. It was awesome.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 1st, 2005, 12:31 am #2

I think seeing what's happening in the New Orleans has made us all who live elsewhere stop and appreciate what we have. As bad as some of our Florida hurricanes have been it's been nothing like that. I just can't imagine dealing with a whole city under water and all the problems that brings. Even the emergency systems have failed. It's like civilization there has been thrown back into the stone age. We more fortunately soles should stop complaining about the annoyance of paying more for gas and be grateful we have a car to put it in and a house to drive home to and our love ones there waiting for us.
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Boreas
Boreas

September 1st, 2005, 2:58 am #3

It is pretty quiet here and BFF these days. I only wish it were as quiet in my mind. I have been watching the news of the hurricane and all that horror, and have been watching the price of gas go through the roof. I have missed a week of bike rides because our youngest daughter was home all last week sick, she is better now, thanks, and have been feeling just a little gloomy about the whole world.

This morning I forced my feet out the door with Peter's and my bikes and we went for a ride. As I am heading out I am wondering if I should be working so hard for something that seems so frivolous when all that is going on in the world is such a mess. But I still managed to go.

The sun was just coming up over the trees as we took off and there was actually a chill in the wind when we first started down the hill, that soon disappeared, but I happily noted that it was there. I rode for just a tiny bit over an hour this morning. All the motorists that past us during that time waved. I couldn't help thinking they probably figured they better make friends since they would maybe be on bikes next week too with gas the way it is.

On the last stretch before the end of our ride the sun was shining so brightly that there was a full shadow of me and my bike to my left on the road. I could see quite obviously that the lady in the shadow wasn't wearing a bra!

My spirits were lifted for having ridden that bike this morning. I know that all is still pretty screwed up in the world right now. But for an hour of this sunny morning I was transported to the wind and the sun. I was nowhere and everywhere else. It was awesome.
Thank you for sharing your thoughts Michaela. We have been complaining about the cool weather up here this summer. I think weather is preferable to the floods that are happening in New Oreans. I can't even imagine what that would be like. It did remind me of the Tsunami pictures I saw this winter.

I hadn't watched too much TV coverage of the hurricane/flood until tonight. We were in Calgary on the weekend, and tend not to watch too much TV when away from home. I was shocked at the pictures I saw on the news today. It will sure take a long time to clean up, and I doubt some areas will ever be back to normal there.

I have been more conscious of the need to feel grateful lately. We did a lot of walking in Calgary and I ended up with blisters. As much as I don't like that, it also reminds me to be grateful to be able to walk freely and even to walk.

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Eiffel
Eiffel

September 1st, 2005, 3:27 am #4

It is pretty quiet here and BFF these days. I only wish it were as quiet in my mind. I have been watching the news of the hurricane and all that horror, and have been watching the price of gas go through the roof. I have missed a week of bike rides because our youngest daughter was home all last week sick, she is better now, thanks, and have been feeling just a little gloomy about the whole world.

This morning I forced my feet out the door with Peter's and my bikes and we went for a ride. As I am heading out I am wondering if I should be working so hard for something that seems so frivolous when all that is going on in the world is such a mess. But I still managed to go.

The sun was just coming up over the trees as we took off and there was actually a chill in the wind when we first started down the hill, that soon disappeared, but I happily noted that it was there. I rode for just a tiny bit over an hour this morning. All the motorists that past us during that time waved. I couldn't help thinking they probably figured they better make friends since they would maybe be on bikes next week too with gas the way it is.

On the last stretch before the end of our ride the sun was shining so brightly that there was a full shadow of me and my bike to my left on the road. I could see quite obviously that the lady in the shadow wasn't wearing a bra!

My spirits were lifted for having ridden that bike this morning. I know that all is still pretty screwed up in the world right now. But for an hour of this sunny morning I was transported to the wind and the sun. I was nowhere and everywhere else. It was awesome.
Yes, I noticed the nip (no pun intended) in the air this morning and called our local time/temperature and it was only 64 degrees. Fall is just around the corner!

The Gulf Coast tragedy is probably far worse than we can even imagine. We have family friends who live in New Orleans and also have a lodge on the Pearl River about 1 1/2 hours northeast of New Orleans, and we think their Kenner house (N.O.) is probably gone. Their daughter (our age) lives in Austin and she is who told us about the probability of the house. Her parents are ok and probably know nothing of the devastation in N.O. because they have no connection to the outside world right now. I don't know how she knows they are o.k., but I'm sure there is some confirmation.

On a lighter note, we just returned from Hawaii (no beach time unfortunately) and only saw a few brafree women during the whole trip. There were a lot of the tank tops with built-in support, but not much less. At dinner one night my mother commented that she was surprised that I was wearing my "underwear" out in public! It was a double camisole with built in layer, and as we left the restaurant, I told her that I had on more clothes than anyone else in the restaurant other than her!

It is about a year since I've been bra-free and I'm loving it! I do wear a stretchy "bralet" camisole to work, but it's a far cry from the tortuous underwire bras I'd been wearing. Thanks for the support--again, no pun intended (!) from the BFF!!!!!
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Joined: September 20th, 2003, 4:27 pm

September 1st, 2005, 12:25 pm #5

It is pretty quiet here and BFF these days. I only wish it were as quiet in my mind. I have been watching the news of the hurricane and all that horror, and have been watching the price of gas go through the roof. I have missed a week of bike rides because our youngest daughter was home all last week sick, she is better now, thanks, and have been feeling just a little gloomy about the whole world.

This morning I forced my feet out the door with Peter's and my bikes and we went for a ride. As I am heading out I am wondering if I should be working so hard for something that seems so frivolous when all that is going on in the world is such a mess. But I still managed to go.

The sun was just coming up over the trees as we took off and there was actually a chill in the wind when we first started down the hill, that soon disappeared, but I happily noted that it was there. I rode for just a tiny bit over an hour this morning. All the motorists that past us during that time waved. I couldn't help thinking they probably figured they better make friends since they would maybe be on bikes next week too with gas the way it is.

On the last stretch before the end of our ride the sun was shining so brightly that there was a full shadow of me and my bike to my left on the road. I could see quite obviously that the lady in the shadow wasn't wearing a bra!

My spirits were lifted for having ridden that bike this morning. I know that all is still pretty screwed up in the world right now. But for an hour of this sunny morning I was transported to the wind and the sun. I was nowhere and everywhere else. It was awesome.
Hi y'all! Glad to hear from you, too, Eiffel! Thank you Boreas, too, for your story. I do want to hear from all of you about the small stuff. It is balm for all of our souls. I even like to hear about the blisters and bralettes! Even hearing how much it cost to fill your gas tank is interesting, in a sick sort of way!

Hunting for the check book this morning kept us from our ride. It was in my car afterall! Criminy! I will get back on the bike tomorrow morning. Some of you might think that my talk of bike rides and such is trivial. I agree, but it is where we all live, whether it is a bike or a walk or just taking the time to watch the news and find out about those poor souls in Louisiana right now. It is just where I am.

I am glad y'all are where you are, and safe.
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Joined: September 20th, 2003, 4:27 pm

September 1st, 2005, 12:30 pm #6

I think seeing what's happening in the New Orleans has made us all who live elsewhere stop and appreciate what we have. As bad as some of our Florida hurricanes have been it's been nothing like that. I just can't imagine dealing with a whole city under water and all the problems that brings. Even the emergency systems have failed. It's like civilization there has been thrown back into the stone age. We more fortunately soles should stop complaining about the annoyance of paying more for gas and be grateful we have a car to put it in and a house to drive home to and our love ones there waiting for us.
I go crazy when I hear, and I have heard it twice this morning alone, the news reporters say that it will be three months before the people can come back to their homes. What homes?! They have no homes! Is some sort of home fairy going to come in and rebuild them? These reporters did go to college, right?
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Boreas
Boreas

September 1st, 2005, 3:03 pm #7

Hi y'all! Glad to hear from you, too, Eiffel! Thank you Boreas, too, for your story. I do want to hear from all of you about the small stuff. It is balm for all of our souls. I even like to hear about the blisters and bralettes! Even hearing how much it cost to fill your gas tank is interesting, in a sick sort of way!

Hunting for the check book this morning kept us from our ride. It was in my car afterall! Criminy! I will get back on the bike tomorrow morning. Some of you might think that my talk of bike rides and such is trivial. I agree, but it is where we all live, whether it is a bike or a walk or just taking the time to watch the news and find out about those poor souls in Louisiana right now. It is just where I am.

I am glad y'all are where you are, and safe.
I don't know how our gas prices compare to yours since we measure ours differently. At the beginning of the summer they were about $.95 per litre. Now they are $1.10 per litre. They have gone up about $.10 per litre overnight. Apparently they are about $1.40 in psrts of Canada.

I am glad we bought a small Subaru five years ago! No Hummer for this girl!

Did Texas get any of the hurricane? How about other people in here?

Michaela, make sure you take some breaks from the news! It will be good for your soul.



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Joined: September 20th, 2003, 4:27 pm

September 1st, 2005, 3:44 pm #8

I only take the news in small doses. I mostly tune in at morning to find out if there might be any big weather events I should know about since we are prone to thunder storms which can lead to tornados. But I usually take whatever the weather guys say with a grain of salt, too, since they sometimes don't get it right.

I think Canada's gas prices have always been higher than ours, though I may be wrong about that. I don't know about today, but yesterday we went up to $3.00 for a gallon of regular unleaded. I'm am very glad to be in my little PT Cruiser. Even with that, I am staying home as much as possible. No Sunday drives for me. The problem I face is Texas is so huge we have to drive forever to get to town.

On the day of the hurricane I noticed we had a dark sky and a lot of wind. I am west of Austin quite a ways and as far as I know none of the Texas coast was hit at all with Katrina. At least not so any damage was reported.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 1st, 2005, 6:15 pm #9

I go crazy when I hear, and I have heard it twice this morning alone, the news reporters say that it will be three months before the people can come back to their homes. What homes?! They have no homes! Is some sort of home fairy going to come in and rebuild them? These reporters did go to college, right?
I suspect many will never return. When Hur. Andrew socked Homestead back in '92 many people just moved to other places and never returned. I think it would be especially crazy to rebuilt in a city like New Oleans that is below sea-level and you must depend on dikes to keep you dry. It's possible to built a house that's pretty well Hurricane proof. Building codes here now specify 136-mph wind loading which can be achieved with shutters and well anchored roofs. But theres nothing you can do if you live in a valley that floods every time the dike gets a hole. I sure wouldn't built there.
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John Bayko
John Bayko

September 2nd, 2005, 1:18 am #10

I only take the news in small doses. I mostly tune in at morning to find out if there might be any big weather events I should know about since we are prone to thunder storms which can lead to tornados. But I usually take whatever the weather guys say with a grain of salt, too, since they sometimes don't get it right.

I think Canada's gas prices have always been higher than ours, though I may be wrong about that. I don't know about today, but yesterday we went up to $3.00 for a gallon of regular unleaded. I'm am very glad to be in my little PT Cruiser. Even with that, I am staying home as much as possible. No Sunday drives for me. The problem I face is Texas is so huge we have to drive forever to get to town.

On the day of the hurricane I noticed we had a dark sky and a lot of wind. I am west of Austin quite a ways and as far as I know none of the Texas coast was hit at all with Katrina. At least not so any damage was reported.
"Canada's gas prices have always been higher than ours"

Gas in Canada has more tax on it, but even though Canada is a petroleum producer, the prices are based on the international market. BTW, $3.00 USD per gallon is in the neighbourhood of $0.90 to $1.00 CAD per litre.

Might as well enjoy it. All measurable indicators are that world petroleum production has nearly peaked, as was predicted in the 1970s. The actual production of much of it may be delayed for a few years, producing temporary shortages but delaying the peak, due to the war against Iraq stopping most of its production, and the damage to oil platforms and refineries from hurricane Katrina, but by 2010, petroleum production will almost certainly decline, while demand will continue to increase. That means prices are close to the lowest they will ever be again (minus a few fluctuations in the next five years - stock up when they happen!).

The main cause of the high prices is not really diminished production from Iraq or anywhere else, but the growing economies of countries entering industrialization - mainly China, but also India, and to a lesser extent, Brazil and many other South American and Asian countries. China's growth has also driven up prices for other commodities like steel and other metals.

BTW, for your reference, the Bush/Republican position (available on the "Project for a New American Century" web site) is to rely on private investment to develop alternative energy sources as the costs slowly come down, while at the same time trying to ensure a stable energy supply to prevent shocks to the economy. Although it's inevitable that petrolium prices will rise, it's hoped this will occur relatively slowly, and make alternative energy competitive enough to be developed. There is strong pressure on the Bush administration to start releasing some of the U.S strategic energy reserves, a giant resevoir of petroleum stored in Texas, to prevent a recession due to the recent energy price spikes - they probably won't unless prices fail to stabilize for the better part of a year.

The energy plan also includes investing in alternative energy research. Although the government funds only a tiny amount compared to what it could, the government targets its funding to projects unlikely to get industry funding - the right-wing philosophy is to stay out of research that private industry would do anyway. At least that's the theory - there is a significant amount of pork-barreling in the U.S that invests a lot of money into regional electoral support rather than genuine research. I'm sure much of it goes where it should though.
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