Ken Schram at KOMO tries again to get women to hide their breasts

Ken Schram at KOMO tries again to get women to hide their breasts

Wayne
Wayne

June 28th, 2005, 8:38 pm #1

Ken Schram at KOMO in Seattle still isn't willing to admit that he's wrong. If you can find a way to tell him that he's wrong that's simple enough that he can understand it, he could probably use some more e-mail. It won't be easy, though. Being told in person by 150 women that he was wrong wasn't enough.

Don't take what I say to mean that he's always wrong; actually, I agree with him about twice as often as I disagree with him. That's a lot better than any recent presidents. Ken's trouble is that when he's good, he's really good, but when he's bad, he's awful.

http://www.komotv.com/stories/37676.htm

Ken Schram Commentary: An Ear-Full, Not An Eye-Full

June 28, 2005

By Ken Schram

SEATTLE - If I have to explain what I meant, I said it wrong to begin with.

That's bad form. (Read the earlier commentary here)

So there I was with some 150 women telling me how discouraging it was to hear that I'd compared breast-feeding in public to peeing in a jar at the mall.

My central point was that women should be more modest when nursing in that mall, or at a restaurant, or anywhere out in public; that popping out a breast without regard for the people around them is rude.

Women defend such actions by proclaiming: "It's natural."

Hence, my reference to that other "natural" act.

Didn't work.

The more militant women I met at Seattle Center on Monday said they don't give a flip about modesty.

They don't care where the bra comes off, who's around, what they see, or who it makes uncomfortable.

Other women said that men have to evolve and give up seeing breasts as being sometimes something sexual.

Riiight.

Nothing delusional about that.

Wanting to be sure I'm clear here, I'll use concise sentences.

Women should be encouraged to breast-feed.

Breast-feeding is good -- for the baby, and the mom.

But women should be discouraged from being exhibitionists.

A little modesty in public goes a long way.

And if you have to pee, don't say so in front of nursing moms.

Seems to get them really riled up.

Want to share your thoughts with Ken Schram? You can e-mail him at kenschram@komo4news.com
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 28th, 2005, 8:53 pm #2

It may be that this guy is just being a ass to get attention.
It wouldn't be the first time someone has taken an unpopular position to stir up publicity.
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Wayne
Wayne

June 28th, 2005, 9:13 pm #3

Ken Schram at KOMO in Seattle still isn't willing to admit that he's wrong. If you can find a way to tell him that he's wrong that's simple enough that he can understand it, he could probably use some more e-mail. It won't be easy, though. Being told in person by 150 women that he was wrong wasn't enough.

Don't take what I say to mean that he's always wrong; actually, I agree with him about twice as often as I disagree with him. That's a lot better than any recent presidents. Ken's trouble is that when he's good, he's really good, but when he's bad, he's awful.

http://www.komotv.com/stories/37676.htm

Ken Schram Commentary: An Ear-Full, Not An Eye-Full

June 28, 2005

By Ken Schram

SEATTLE - If I have to explain what I meant, I said it wrong to begin with.

That's bad form. (Read the earlier commentary here)

So there I was with some 150 women telling me how discouraging it was to hear that I'd compared breast-feeding in public to peeing in a jar at the mall.

My central point was that women should be more modest when nursing in that mall, or at a restaurant, or anywhere out in public; that popping out a breast without regard for the people around them is rude.

Women defend such actions by proclaiming: "It's natural."

Hence, my reference to that other "natural" act.

Didn't work.

The more militant women I met at Seattle Center on Monday said they don't give a flip about modesty.

They don't care where the bra comes off, who's around, what they see, or who it makes uncomfortable.

Other women said that men have to evolve and give up seeing breasts as being sometimes something sexual.

Riiight.

Nothing delusional about that.

Wanting to be sure I'm clear here, I'll use concise sentences.

Women should be encouraged to breast-feed.

Breast-feeding is good -- for the baby, and the mom.

But women should be discouraged from being exhibitionists.

A little modesty in public goes a long way.

And if you have to pee, don't say so in front of nursing moms.

Seems to get them really riled up.

Want to share your thoughts with Ken Schram? You can e-mail him at kenschram@komo4news.com
The Seattle Post-Intelligencer is getting faster at responding to Ken's bad attitude about nursing mothers. Use the link to get pictures with the text.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/jamieson/ ... ert28.html

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

TV pundit Schramm slipped on mother's milk

By ROBERT L. JAMIESON Jr.
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER COLUMNIST

Hell hath no fury like breast-feeding moms scorned.

My column calling for people to lighten up when it comes to women who breast-feed in public generated nearly 1,000 e-mails and phone messages.

That is more feedback than comes from blasting the disastrous war in Iraq or the $11 billion Monorail Moneytrain.

People called this month's piece "boob-tastic," which makes me blush.

Responses have poured in from as far away as Saudi Arabia and Australia.

Several folks talked about the importance of a pro-breast-feeding message coming from the perspective of a dude.

One woman, Susan Heffern-Shelton, offered a proposal that perked up this bachelor's ears: Will you marry me?

Nearly all of the responses agreed that KOMO/4 commentator Ken Schram and his network counterpart, Barbara Walters, are nincompoops for disparaging mothers who feed their children the natural way in public.

Schram suggested it was akin to public urination; Walters said it made her queasy.

The comments gave fuel to events such as yesterday's breast-feeding rally at the Seattle Center. The afternoon gathering drew more than 150 moms and their babies for a show of support to make a point:

It is hip to NIP -- Nurse in Public.

"We want to show that moms can breast-feed in public without feeling embarrassed or ashamed," rally organizer Sarah Smith was telling me. "And ... uh-oh -- there's Ken Schram."

Yes, there was the loquacious Bearded One, in his patented black turtleneck. Schram walked up gingerly to the throng, like Daniel entering a den of chops-licking lionesses.

"I'm not going to apologize," Schram said.

Eyes rolled.

"My stand," Schram trudged on, "is a little modesty goes a long way."

That's fine, reasonable, even.

But when one conflates public breast-feeding with public urination -- as Schram had the audacity to do for thousands and thousands of viewers -- one makes a beautiful and natural act seem unnatural and shameful.

Any regrets about the pee slip, Ken?

"I'm, I'm given pause," he told me, sounding genuine. "I'm going to have to rethink that. Mull it over."

While Schram does that he might want to take into account his spouse's thoughts. His wife of 35 years who breast-fed their three kids disagreed with his take. He says she called him "an expletive deleted."

"Did you realize I was breast-feeding my daughter as I spoke with you?" mom Nipuna Dasi asked Schram at the rally as she held baby Amelie.

Schram shook his head. He hadn't noticed.

I did -- barely.

Dasi, just three feet in front of Schram, was careful and adroit about her kid's business.

Which is the point I've been trying to make from the beginning.

Most women do nurse respectfully in public and cover up as much as humanly possible.

They should not be subjected to ignorant words that arise because some people have overly sexualized breasts and get uncomfortable.

"Who gets to draw the line?" one woman asked. "Is a quarter inch of breast showing too much? A half-inch?"

Lisa Daugaard, who works in the public defender's office, said the recent rail against breast- feeding made her self-conscious about nursing her 9-month-old daughter during a flight to Washington, D.C.

It shouldn't be this way.

Thankfully, not all people possess a narrow state of mind.

What took me by surprise were the many progressive-minded men who chimed in.

"I'm 72 years old," said Arthur Ta-Tanka-Ska of Seattle, who grew up on the Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. "My mom breast-fed all nine of us kids. ... (We) seemed to turn out fine. Breast-feeding did not make any of us go off the deep end. ... Ken could use a little mother's milk."

"Restaurants should provide a private room," writes Walter Wallis, "for (jerks) who are offended by breast-feeding. Of course, those who are really traumatized should perhaps order in. No TV, though, because they might rerun the Janet Jackson (Super Bowl) flash."

My take is that criticism against public nursing should take a backseat to the ultimate goal: Crying kids need to be fed.

Study after study shows breast milk is healthier than bottled milk and makes infants less susceptible to childhood cancers and other health woes.

The backlash against public breast-feeding is particularly troubling given the burdens women already face in society.

They feel the pressure to be in the work force. They feel the pressure to be good mothers.

Now, on top of all that, they are getting flak for performing what women do the world over without somuch knee-jerk and cantankerous fuss.

Breast-feeding is natural, folks.

It's good for infants.

It's been around since Adam and Eve.

It's about time Americans get a grip.

P-I columnist Robert L. Jamieson Jr. can be reachedat 206-448-8125 or robertjamieson@seattlepi.com
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JB
JB

June 28th, 2005, 10:54 pm #4

Ken Schram at KOMO in Seattle still isn't willing to admit that he's wrong. If you can find a way to tell him that he's wrong that's simple enough that he can understand it, he could probably use some more e-mail. It won't be easy, though. Being told in person by 150 women that he was wrong wasn't enough.

Don't take what I say to mean that he's always wrong; actually, I agree with him about twice as often as I disagree with him. That's a lot better than any recent presidents. Ken's trouble is that when he's good, he's really good, but when he's bad, he's awful.

http://www.komotv.com/stories/37676.htm

Ken Schram Commentary: An Ear-Full, Not An Eye-Full

June 28, 2005

By Ken Schram

SEATTLE - If I have to explain what I meant, I said it wrong to begin with.

That's bad form. (Read the earlier commentary here)

So there I was with some 150 women telling me how discouraging it was to hear that I'd compared breast-feeding in public to peeing in a jar at the mall.

My central point was that women should be more modest when nursing in that mall, or at a restaurant, or anywhere out in public; that popping out a breast without regard for the people around them is rude.

Women defend such actions by proclaiming: "It's natural."

Hence, my reference to that other "natural" act.

Didn't work.

The more militant women I met at Seattle Center on Monday said they don't give a flip about modesty.

They don't care where the bra comes off, who's around, what they see, or who it makes uncomfortable.

Other women said that men have to evolve and give up seeing breasts as being sometimes something sexual.

Riiight.

Nothing delusional about that.

Wanting to be sure I'm clear here, I'll use concise sentences.

Women should be encouraged to breast-feed.

Breast-feeding is good -- for the baby, and the mom.

But women should be discouraged from being exhibitionists.

A little modesty in public goes a long way.

And if you have to pee, don't say so in front of nursing moms.

Seems to get them really riled up.

Want to share your thoughts with Ken Schram? You can e-mail him at kenschram@komo4news.com
Is Ken Schram a "shock jock"?
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Share

JB
JB

June 28th, 2005, 11:00 pm #5

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer is getting faster at responding to Ken's bad attitude about nursing mothers. Use the link to get pictures with the text.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/jamieson/ ... ert28.html

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

TV pundit Schramm slipped on mother's milk

By ROBERT L. JAMIESON Jr.
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER COLUMNIST

Hell hath no fury like breast-feeding moms scorned.

My column calling for people to lighten up when it comes to women who breast-feed in public generated nearly 1,000 e-mails and phone messages.

That is more feedback than comes from blasting the disastrous war in Iraq or the $11 billion Monorail Moneytrain.

People called this month's piece "boob-tastic," which makes me blush.

Responses have poured in from as far away as Saudi Arabia and Australia.

Several folks talked about the importance of a pro-breast-feeding message coming from the perspective of a dude.

One woman, Susan Heffern-Shelton, offered a proposal that perked up this bachelor's ears: Will you marry me?

Nearly all of the responses agreed that KOMO/4 commentator Ken Schram and his network counterpart, Barbara Walters, are nincompoops for disparaging mothers who feed their children the natural way in public.

Schram suggested it was akin to public urination; Walters said it made her queasy.

The comments gave fuel to events such as yesterday's breast-feeding rally at the Seattle Center. The afternoon gathering drew more than 150 moms and their babies for a show of support to make a point:

It is hip to NIP -- Nurse in Public.

"We want to show that moms can breast-feed in public without feeling embarrassed or ashamed," rally organizer Sarah Smith was telling me. "And ... uh-oh -- there's Ken Schram."

Yes, there was the loquacious Bearded One, in his patented black turtleneck. Schram walked up gingerly to the throng, like Daniel entering a den of chops-licking lionesses.

"I'm not going to apologize," Schram said.

Eyes rolled.

"My stand," Schram trudged on, "is a little modesty goes a long way."

That's fine, reasonable, even.

But when one conflates public breast-feeding with public urination -- as Schram had the audacity to do for thousands and thousands of viewers -- one makes a beautiful and natural act seem unnatural and shameful.

Any regrets about the pee slip, Ken?

"I'm, I'm given pause," he told me, sounding genuine. "I'm going to have to rethink that. Mull it over."

While Schram does that he might want to take into account his spouse's thoughts. His wife of 35 years who breast-fed their three kids disagreed with his take. He says she called him "an expletive deleted."

"Did you realize I was breast-feeding my daughter as I spoke with you?" mom Nipuna Dasi asked Schram at the rally as she held baby Amelie.

Schram shook his head. He hadn't noticed.

I did -- barely.

Dasi, just three feet in front of Schram, was careful and adroit about her kid's business.

Which is the point I've been trying to make from the beginning.

Most women do nurse respectfully in public and cover up as much as humanly possible.

They should not be subjected to ignorant words that arise because some people have overly sexualized breasts and get uncomfortable.

"Who gets to draw the line?" one woman asked. "Is a quarter inch of breast showing too much? A half-inch?"

Lisa Daugaard, who works in the public defender's office, said the recent rail against breast- feeding made her self-conscious about nursing her 9-month-old daughter during a flight to Washington, D.C.

It shouldn't be this way.

Thankfully, not all people possess a narrow state of mind.

What took me by surprise were the many progressive-minded men who chimed in.

"I'm 72 years old," said Arthur Ta-Tanka-Ska of Seattle, who grew up on the Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. "My mom breast-fed all nine of us kids. ... (We) seemed to turn out fine. Breast-feeding did not make any of us go off the deep end. ... Ken could use a little mother's milk."

"Restaurants should provide a private room," writes Walter Wallis, "for (jerks) who are offended by breast-feeding. Of course, those who are really traumatized should perhaps order in. No TV, though, because they might rerun the Janet Jackson (Super Bowl) flash."

My take is that criticism against public nursing should take a backseat to the ultimate goal: Crying kids need to be fed.

Study after study shows breast milk is healthier than bottled milk and makes infants less susceptible to childhood cancers and other health woes.

The backlash against public breast-feeding is particularly troubling given the burdens women already face in society.

They feel the pressure to be in the work force. They feel the pressure to be good mothers.

Now, on top of all that, they are getting flak for performing what women do the world over without somuch knee-jerk and cantankerous fuss.

Breast-feeding is natural, folks.

It's good for infants.

It's been around since Adam and Eve.

It's about time Americans get a grip.

P-I columnist Robert L. Jamieson Jr. can be reachedat 206-448-8125 or robertjamieson@seattlepi.com
I wonder if those same men have a stack of Playboy magazines at home on the coffee table so that if the breast is seen in that other context, it's okay.
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michaela
michaela

June 29th, 2005, 3:42 am #6

Is Ken Schram a "shock jock"?
His use of language and sarcasm don't seem like main stream journalism. He reminds me of someone we all know here, and I thought about writing another email, but it would probably just be a waste of time, as he seems to be of that same mentalilty that men are primates and women should do as they are told.
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bn
bn

June 29th, 2005, 11:52 am #7

It may be that this guy is just being a ass to get attention.
It wouldn't be the first time someone has taken an unpopular position to stir up publicity.
The guy can't be that against seeing uncovered breasts can he?

He is an entertainer with an "opinion". I wouldn't give him the $.02 he thinks his opinion is worth.
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