High School -- 1957 and Now

High School -- 1957 and Now

Bob
Bob

August 10th, 2011, 12:33 pm #1

Not sure if this was posted before, but I thought it was pretty accurate:


Scenario 1:
Jack goes quail hunting before school and then pulls into the school parking lot with his shotgun in his truck's gun rack.
1957 - Vice Principal comes over, looks at Jack's shotgun, goes to his car and gets his shotgun to show Jack.
2011 - School goes into lock down, FBI called, Jack hauled off to jail and never sees his truck or gun again. Counselors called in for traumatized students and teachers.

Scenario 2:
Johnny and Mark get into a fist fight after school.
1957 - Crowd gathers. Mark wins. Johnny and Mark shake hands and end up buddies.
2011 - Police called and SWAT team arrives -- they arrest both Johnny and Mark. They are both charged with assault and both expelled even though Johnny started it.

Scenario 3:
Jeffrey will not be still in class, he disrupts other students.
1957 - Jeffrey sent to the Principal's office and given a good paddling by the Principal. He then returns to class, sits still and does not disrupt class again.
2011 - Jeffrey is given huge doses of Ritalin. He becomes a zombie. He is then tested for ADD. The family gets extra money (SSI) from the government because Jeffrey has a disability.

Scenario 4:
Billy breaks a window in his neighbor's car and his Dad gives him a whipping with his belt.
1957 - Billy is more careful next time, grows up normal, goes to college and becomes a successful businessman.
2011 - Billy's dad is arrested for child abuse. Billy is removed to foster care and joins a gang. The state psychologist is told by Billy's sister that she remembers being abused herself and their dad goes to prison. Billy's mom has an affair with the psychologist.

Scenario 5:
Mark gets a headache and takes some aspirin to school..
1957 - Mark shares his aspirin with the Principal out on the smoking dock.
2011 - The police are called and Mark is expelled from school for drug violations. His car is then searched for drugs and weapons.

Scenario 6:
Pedro fails high school English.
1957 - Pedro goes to summer school, passes English and goes to college.
2011 - Pedro's cause is taken up by state. Newspaper articles appear nationally explaining that teaching English as a requirement for graduation is racist. ACLU files class action lawsuit against the state school system and Pedro's English teacher. English is then banned from core curriculum. Pedro is given his diploma anyway but ends up mowing lawns for a living because he cannot speak English.

Scenario 7:
Johnny takes apart leftover firecrackers from the Fourth of July, puts them in a model airplane paint bottle and blows up a red ant bed.
1957 - Ants die.
2011 - ATF, Homeland Security and the FBI are all called. Johnny is charged with domestic terrorism. The FBI investigates his parents -- and all siblings are removed from their home and all computers are confiscated. Johnny's dad is placed on a terror watch list and is never allowed to fly again.

Scenario 8:
Johnny falls while running during recess and scrapes his knee. He is found crying by his teacher, Mary. Mary hugs him to comfort him.
1957 - In a short time, Johnny feels better and goes on playing.
2011 - Mary is accused of being a sexual predator and loses her job. She faces 3 years in State Prison. Johnny undergoes 5 years of therapy.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 10th, 2011, 1:39 pm #2

Yes this, or something very similar was posted before. But it warrants repeating.
. . . . .
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Joined: May 9th, 2005, 12:05 pm

August 10th, 2011, 3:25 pm #3

Not sure if this was posted before, but I thought it was pretty accurate:


Scenario 1:
Jack goes quail hunting before school and then pulls into the school parking lot with his shotgun in his truck's gun rack.
1957 - Vice Principal comes over, looks at Jack's shotgun, goes to his car and gets his shotgun to show Jack.
2011 - School goes into lock down, FBI called, Jack hauled off to jail and never sees his truck or gun again. Counselors called in for traumatized students and teachers.

Scenario 2:
Johnny and Mark get into a fist fight after school.
1957 - Crowd gathers. Mark wins. Johnny and Mark shake hands and end up buddies.
2011 - Police called and SWAT team arrives -- they arrest both Johnny and Mark. They are both charged with assault and both expelled even though Johnny started it.

Scenario 3:
Jeffrey will not be still in class, he disrupts other students.
1957 - Jeffrey sent to the Principal's office and given a good paddling by the Principal. He then returns to class, sits still and does not disrupt class again.
2011 - Jeffrey is given huge doses of Ritalin. He becomes a zombie. He is then tested for ADD. The family gets extra money (SSI) from the government because Jeffrey has a disability.

Scenario 4:
Billy breaks a window in his neighbor's car and his Dad gives him a whipping with his belt.
1957 - Billy is more careful next time, grows up normal, goes to college and becomes a successful businessman.
2011 - Billy's dad is arrested for child abuse. Billy is removed to foster care and joins a gang. The state psychologist is told by Billy's sister that she remembers being abused herself and their dad goes to prison. Billy's mom has an affair with the psychologist.

Scenario 5:
Mark gets a headache and takes some aspirin to school..
1957 - Mark shares his aspirin with the Principal out on the smoking dock.
2011 - The police are called and Mark is expelled from school for drug violations. His car is then searched for drugs and weapons.

Scenario 6:
Pedro fails high school English.
1957 - Pedro goes to summer school, passes English and goes to college.
2011 - Pedro's cause is taken up by state. Newspaper articles appear nationally explaining that teaching English as a requirement for graduation is racist. ACLU files class action lawsuit against the state school system and Pedro's English teacher. English is then banned from core curriculum. Pedro is given his diploma anyway but ends up mowing lawns for a living because he cannot speak English.

Scenario 7:
Johnny takes apart leftover firecrackers from the Fourth of July, puts them in a model airplane paint bottle and blows up a red ant bed.
1957 - Ants die.
2011 - ATF, Homeland Security and the FBI are all called. Johnny is charged with domestic terrorism. The FBI investigates his parents -- and all siblings are removed from their home and all computers are confiscated. Johnny's dad is placed on a terror watch list and is never allowed to fly again.

Scenario 8:
Johnny falls while running during recess and scrapes his knee. He is found crying by his teacher, Mary. Mary hugs him to comfort him.
1957 - In a short time, Johnny feels better and goes on playing.
2011 - Mary is accused of being a sexual predator and loses her job. She faces 3 years in State Prison. Johnny undergoes 5 years of therapy.
And they must have changed a lot between 1957 (what's special about 1957?) and when I graduated from high school in 1964.

I never once saw anyone bring a gun to school and for that matter, not so many kids had trucks or cars. Never saw any fist fights at school. But small towns were much nicer in 1964, apparently compared with 1957.

I never once saw or heard of any high school student being physically punished. Maybe we were more tolerant of figety people where I went to school. We had gym to run off extra steam or maybe it was walking to school that did it.

I did know of a father who frequently would whip his son with a belt if he wasn't there immediately when called. Everyone called him "high strung." But the son did grow up to be just like his father, if that is normal. I don't think we had psychiatrists in my hometown.

I never saw anyone bring aspirin to school or a backpack or a telephone or a gun or anything like that.

We had no Latin Americans in my hometown. All the foreigners were either Italian or A-rabs. None of us were especially good with English, that being West Virginia. But all the foreigners came decades earlier. The foreign born weren't quite as good with English as the rest of us, however.

We did have firecrackers, some of us, at the 4th of July, although I never did. But there were never any left over, just like ice cream. There's never any left over.

I never once saw a teacher hug a child (or anyone else).

Your past may be different from my past.
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Bob
Bob

August 10th, 2011, 4:51 pm #4

"I never once saw anyone bring a gun to school . . . "

I think I was in second grade when we had a "show-and-tell" at school, when students were encouraged to bring in interesting or meaningful (to student) objects and tell the class about them. My idea was to bring a Japanese rifle from WWII that my father brought back as a souvenir. The rifle was not loaded and the firing pin was removed (which was how my father stored it). The school gave consent, as the item was historical and my mother would bring it in just for the event and take it back with her right afterward. I never knew of any student bringing a firearm on school grounds otherwise (but I wonder if a school today would allow that WWII souvenir firearm to be brought in).

"Never saw any fist fights at school."

We had the occasional fist fight at my schools, which never resulted in anything worse than a bloddy nose or torn clothing.

"I never once saw or heard of any high school student being physically punished."

When I was in grade school, I was a practical joker and mischievous (imagine that). Sometimes the teachers got fed up and either sent me to the principal's office or had me stand out in the hallway for the principal to deal with when he made his hall sweeps. This principal was abusive. He grabbed me behind the neck once and pushed my face into the concrete block wall. He would swat me on the butt as he passed. I would go home crying and said I never wanted to go back to school. When my father heard what happened, he went to the school and told the principal that if he ever touched me again that my father would lay hands on him. There was one other principal who shoved me against a wall and jabbed his finger into my chest, but I was older then and didn't tell anyone.

My father used corporal punishment (he felt that was a parent's perogative and not something school staff should do), but he didn't have to do it often. I grew up afraid of my father and wanting to please him. I was not a big spanker toward my sons. I know they never feared me as I feared my father or as my father feared his. But, we turned out alright.

"I never saw anyone bring aspirin to school or a backpack . . ."

C'mon now Blue, get real. You NEVER saw a student carry aspirin? or a backpack/brief case? Rolling eyes here.

"I never once saw a teacher hug a child (or anyone else)."

Really. How sad.

"Your past may be different from my past."

Obviously so, but I also wonder about the accuracy of some of your recollections. If you have done much newspaper reading, you would undoubtedly have read about conditions in some schools today, where students carry firearms and the schools have metal detectors that all students have to pass through on the way into school buildings . . where students carry all sorts of drugs, legal and illegal (my younger brother told me that at our suburban high school "acid" was sold on school grounds during lunch and break periods -- I didn't see that when I went there, so even a few years can change things). Things like this do occur . . I just think you deny knowledge of them for the sake of argument.


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Joined: May 9th, 2005, 12:05 pm

August 10th, 2011, 5:13 pm #5

Yes, really. You can't deny the experiences I had just because they weren't the same ones you had.

Just think about it. I graduated from high school in 1964. People did not bring backpacks to school. Not for any big reason, just that no one did. Just like they didn't wear bell bottom trousers. That was later. But I suppose you're right. All kids had guns and drugs and bring them to school and somehow smuggle them around the metal detector. Only this little point: the high school my two went to did not have metal detectors. I suppose you imagine I just didn't see them.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 10th, 2011, 5:21 pm #6

"I never once saw anyone bring a gun to school . . . "

I think I was in second grade when we had a "show-and-tell" at school, when students were encouraged to bring in interesting or meaningful (to student) objects and tell the class about them. My idea was to bring a Japanese rifle from WWII that my father brought back as a souvenir. The rifle was not loaded and the firing pin was removed (which was how my father stored it). The school gave consent, as the item was historical and my mother would bring it in just for the event and take it back with her right afterward. I never knew of any student bringing a firearm on school grounds otherwise (but I wonder if a school today would allow that WWII souvenir firearm to be brought in).

"Never saw any fist fights at school."

We had the occasional fist fight at my schools, which never resulted in anything worse than a bloddy nose or torn clothing.

"I never once saw or heard of any high school student being physically punished."

When I was in grade school, I was a practical joker and mischievous (imagine that). Sometimes the teachers got fed up and either sent me to the principal's office or had me stand out in the hallway for the principal to deal with when he made his hall sweeps. This principal was abusive. He grabbed me behind the neck once and pushed my face into the concrete block wall. He would swat me on the butt as he passed. I would go home crying and said I never wanted to go back to school. When my father heard what happened, he went to the school and told the principal that if he ever touched me again that my father would lay hands on him. There was one other principal who shoved me against a wall and jabbed his finger into my chest, but I was older then and didn't tell anyone.

My father used corporal punishment (he felt that was a parent's perogative and not something school staff should do), but he didn't have to do it often. I grew up afraid of my father and wanting to please him. I was not a big spanker toward my sons. I know they never feared me as I feared my father or as my father feared his. But, we turned out alright.

"I never saw anyone bring aspirin to school or a backpack . . ."

C'mon now Blue, get real. You NEVER saw a student carry aspirin? or a backpack/brief case? Rolling eyes here.

"I never once saw a teacher hug a child (or anyone else)."

Really. How sad.

"Your past may be different from my past."

Obviously so, but I also wonder about the accuracy of some of your recollections. If you have done much newspaper reading, you would undoubtedly have read about conditions in some schools today, where students carry firearms and the schools have metal detectors that all students have to pass through on the way into school buildings . . where students carry all sorts of drugs, legal and illegal (my younger brother told me that at our suburban high school "acid" was sold on school grounds during lunch and break periods -- I didn't see that when I went there, so even a few years can change things). Things like this do occur . . I just think you deny knowledge of them for the sake of argument.

I never even heard the subject of guns mentioned at school. The idea someone would have a gun at school was so absurd no one even thought about it.

Several years ago I mention how on a trip to see my mom in NC I paid a visit to my old high school and was totally shocked at how it had changed. When I was a student there (1961-64) there was virtually no thought of security. We guys would often come back after school to play basketball on the courts. Nearly all the buildings were unlocked and you could go in and get water or use the potty. It was a friendly trusting atmosphere.

I was totally shocked at what I saw now- the place look like a prison with tall locked fences, CCTV-cameras and warning signs everywhere. I didn't even try to go inside because I'd probably have to have needed a FBI check to even get through the door.

Sad, very sad.




. . . . .
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Joined: May 9th, 2005, 12:05 pm

August 10th, 2011, 7:16 pm #7

First off, that anonymous post above was from me. My apologies.

It is true that I never heard of anyone bringing a gun to school either and I will admit that things had changed since I finished in 1964, at least in my hometown. The high school I went to (I actually moved and I went one semester at a high school in another county) had no fence. I don't know when the doors were locked or unlocked but the part with the classrooms was locked until time for classes to begin. That was true where my two children went to high school, too. But no metal detectors. However, the school I went to, which is now actually the new middle school, does have a fence around it but I don't know about the metal detectors. That much I can see on Bing but I can't tell about cameras or signs but they're probably there. I never went to the new (current) high school, so I don't know anything about it.

At the other high school I attended for all of one semester, on the other hand, the population in that county has dropped so much the school is closed, as are most of the others. There are only two high schools in that whole county, which is just as sad.

Don't get me wrong. I understand there may have been some underage drinking at the time I was in high school. Drugs may have become a problem later on. I know nothing about where the drugs come from but in that state, the state used to be the only one selling alcohol, except for beer. Don't know what the wine situation was.

Another thing I was aware of that no one has mentioned was that some kids had a lot more money than others. Some did have cars but the parking lot was small and only a few kids drove to school. In fact, one high school senior was killed in a car crash in 1963. The old high school, which was the junior high I went to and is now a grade school, had no parking lot at all. It was right in the middle of town. Things change all right. When have they not?
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Bob
Bob

August 11th, 2011, 4:16 pm #8

And even at a given time things can be different from one region to another. I guess I was just becoming frustrated with you frequent denials of what I saw as realities. I grew up in a suburban community near a medium-sized city, so I'm sure things "way back then" were different from what you experienced. Also, you were able 9 years ahead of me, so things could be different from the eaqrlu-to-mid 60's as compared to the early 70's (just as my school was different for my brother just a few years later than it had been for me). And, the circumstances today are, I'm sure, very different from one region or part of town to another. My old school never has had metal detectors, but staff are much more concerned with safety and accounting for anyone who enters the building than they were when I was a student. I think modern day realities require extra scrutiny and precautions today than was the case during the 60's and 70's.

I never drove to school, or seldom drove away from it, as I had to get permission from my parents to use one of their cars, and they both worked and took their cars to work. I knew the fortunate few who had cars -- some got nice cars when they got their license -- but they were the exception rather than the rule. I recall being 16 and riding my bike, and guys would drive up next to me and yell, "Nice wheels! Haha", and they and their friends/girlfriends would laugh. By the time my sons were that age, they and their drove all the time.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 12th, 2011, 6:39 am #9

Yes, Blue seems to think how things were where he grew up were how they were everywhere. I know this isn't true. It varied from region to region and from time to time even in same area.

For example there was a considerable difference in school dress even from school to school in my home town. My town was rather divided east to west. There were a lot of textiles mills on the east side while the west side tented to be more white-collar and affluence. Kids on the east side wore jeans and sneakers to school while I had to wear leather shoes (typical penny-loafers), dress slacks and button shirts and girls wore dresses or skirts. I don't even know if this was a written rule- its just what everyone did.

All this changed radically soon after I graduated in '64, and by '67 the youth rebellion was going full swing and I saw kids going to school wearing clothes that would have gotten me sent home just a few years before. I recall reading in the newspaper a controversy if schools could require girls to wear bras! (Wow!- did I ever graduate too early!!-

So this shows how different things can be even in the same city and how much it can change in a few years. There is just no way everyone of a given generation had the same experiences.


. . . . .
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Bob
Bob

August 12th, 2011, 1:05 pm #10

I find that MOST of the things listed on theose nostalgia e-mails are things that I recall from my youth. So, even as some things differed, there was a lot of commonality as well. I think it is true that each generation has memories in common -- favorite TV shows, movies, songs, family situations, fads, etc. Mine from the mid-60's to early 80's might be somewhat different from another person's late 40's to early 70's, and yet even in that there was a lot in common (like going on dates to drive-in-movies . . something that was a common way to have fun for a 30 year stretch or so, but which kids today may never do).
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